Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDance Floor
IN THE NEWS

Dance Floor

NEWS
January 31, 1994
"A DANCE craze hit America during the late 1930s and early 1940s," according to Goucher dance professor Chrystelle Trump Bond, writing in the current issue of the Maryland Historical Magazine. And what were local folks dancing during World War II?"Most popular of all was the jitterbug. Despite segregation in the armed forces, defense plants, and the USO, young Americans regardless of gender, race, or class danced the African-based movements of the jitterbug."Incorporating steps from African-American dances like the Lindy hop, boogie woogie, shag, trucking, Charleston, Susie-Q, Shorty-George, and camel walk, jitterbuggers pulsated to syncopated rhythms, especially when dancing to music of the Benny Goodman Orchestra featuring the thrilling drums of Gene Krupa.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By JESSICA BRANDT | April 6, 2006
Grand Central A fixture on the local gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender (GLBT) nightclub scene, this surprisingly large entertainment complex has a high-tech industrial dance floor, video bar, pub and leather club serviced by six bars. Where --1001-1003 N. Charles St. Web site --centralstation pub.com Call --410-752-7133 Notable --The wet underwear competition, held every Sunday after 11 p.m. on the dance floor. If that's not your style, $5 manicures and $5 martinis are offered in the pub Wednesdays after 7 p.m. Or try Tia-Oke with Tia Chambers, an eight-week, crowd-decides karaoke competition (pub side, Monday and Tuesday nights 10:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.)
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1998
They danced to the musical stylings of the 19-piece Mr. Dance orchestra. Graceful couples twirled, dipped and sashayed to the sounds of their youth -- Glenn Miller, Frank Sinatra, Benny Goodman -- the men in classic tailored suits, the women in chiffon, silk and satin.And when it was time to choose the king and queen of the prom yesterday, there wasn't really any competition. Bill and Betty Byrne, who effortlessly glided around the Boumi Temple dance floor all afternoon, were the obvious choice for the honors at the Senior Citizens Prom, sponsored by Loyola College.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | June 16, 2005
Where: TK Sharky's, 2072 Sommerville Road, Annapolis When: 8 tonight and the first and third Thursdays of every month Why: Admit it, guys and gals: You've always wanted to be able to show off your salsa moves - you just never learned any. Now you don't have an excuse. Follow dance instructor Barbara Bernstein's lead 8 p.m.-9:15 p.m., and then flash your newly learned salsa chops on the dance floor all night. Information: 301-980-6043, www.danceintime.com. $7.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | May 16, 1999
Baltimore's Centro de la Comunidad celebrated its fifth anniversary with a Fiesta Latina, a shindig with salsa (both at dinner and on the dance floor) at Lista's restaurant in Fells Point.The evening began with a mariachi band and margaritas. No, that wasn't a conga line snaking onto the back balcony. It was just folks waiting for their chance at the burritos, black beans and rice.Among those enjoying this evening were Haydee Rodriguez, Centro's executive director; Dr. Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, chair of Centro's board of directors; Dr. Leonardo Ortega, board vice chair; Dr. Wilfredo Nieves, Hector Torres and Andrew Jezic, board members; Angelo Solara, vice chair of the Mayor's Committee on Hispanic Affairs; and Rahn Barnes, Provident Bank of Maryland.
NEWS
March 5, 1991
Arthur Murray said he made a business out of ballroom dancing, but his real business was making people feel better about themselves. His success at it made him a very rich man at his death at age 95 last weekend in Honolulu.If the smiles and charm of Arthur Murray dance instructors were not always genuine -- in 1946, disgruntled instructors went on strike wearing prison uniforms -- neither did the thousands of students who flocked to Murray's studios necessarily expect them to be. Murray understood that the mystique of gliding around a dance floor was the allure of a world apart, a place where smiles and charm for their own sake are as essential as rhythm.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | May 20, 1997
It figures. Just when we'd finally written him off as a musical irrelevance, banished forever to the nether regions of the gossip columns, Michael Jackson goes and upends our preconceptions by making a good album. Is the guy trying to make life difficult for music critics, or what?Appallingly enough, Jackson pulls it off without even bothering to deliver a full album of new material. "Blood on the Dance Floor: HIStory in the Mix" (Epic 68000, arriving in stores today) is basically a five-song EP, padded out to album length by eight remixes from his 1995 album "HIStory."
BUSINESS
By DeWitt Bliss and DeWitt Bliss,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 6, 1996
More than 40 years ago, Charles and Yolanda Foehrkolb had their wedding reception in the Breezy Point Beach dance hall.Now they live in it.The beach, owned by Mr. Foehrkolb's family, closed about 12 years ago, roughly the same time that he retired as a furnace feeder at Eastern Stainless Steel Co.But it had long been a home away from home. The couple and their children formerly lived on the park grounds during the season and in Highlandtown the rest of the year.Foehrkolb's father and an uncle bought the property in 1929 for duck hunting, but soon afterward they began clearing the grounds for the park and sandy beach that would accommodate as many as 3,000 people.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.