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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | September 6, 2007
Albin J. Grden, a violinist, clarinetist and saxophonist who taught in Baltimore public schools for more than four decades and was a longtime member of the Baltimore City Municipal Park Band, died Aug. 30 of kidney failure at Oak Crest Village. He was 81. Mr. Grden was born in Baltimore into a musical family. His father, a Polish immigrant, played the violin, and his mother played and taught piano. "I guess Al started playing violin when he was 8 years old, and he'd practice, practice and practice," said a brother, Eugene C. Grden of White Hall.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 1, 2011
George S. Everly Sr., former secretary-treasurer of the old Baltimore Transit Co. who also directed and played in a dance band, died Oct. 25 of renal failure at Genesis HealthCare in Severna Park. Mr. Everly, who had lived in Catonsville for more than 60 years, was 94. The son of a Baltimore Transit Co. mechanic and a homemaker, Mr. Everly was born in Baltimore and raised on his family's farm in Ilchester, and later in Ellicott City. After graduating in 1934 from Ellicott City High School, he studied accounting at the Baltimore College of Commerce, from which he graduated.
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NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | October 18, 1994
F. Burton Hammann Jr., retired owner of the Hammann Music Co. and co-founder of a society dance band, died Oct. 11 of complications after surgery at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 87.Known as Burt, he retired in 1965 as vice president of the #F family-owned firm that was established in 1921 by his father, Frederick B. Hammann, a banjo player and musical instrument dealer.The store at 206 N. Liberty St. in Baltimore sold instruments, records and sheet music.He and his brothers, C. Gordon Hammann and R. Warren Hammann, took over the business after their father's death in 1948.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Playing a prime 9 p.m. slot at Miami's Ultra Music Festival earlier this year, Cut Copy made for an odd stage presence. The electronic and dance music bacchanal attended every March by thousands of ravers and wannabe ravers is dominated by brand-name DJs — Tiesto, Carl Cox. And yet, there was Cut Copy, in matching white suits — one of the few live bands on the three-day bill. It was a fitting move for a band that's always striven to blend rock and dance music, and has mostly succeeded.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | October 22, 2000
Swags of blue and white slathered the ceiling of Hill Field House. Scores of tables covered the floor below -- crisp white -- a bunch of gold and blue balloons bobbed above each table. In a room that usually plays host to basketball games, the only group playing tonight would be a dance band -- as Morgan State University celebrated "MSU Gala XVI." Among the 1,400 MSU alumni and supporters feasting and feting: Beverly Booth Brown, event chair; Barbara Hill, Dr. Clayton Stansbury; Carolyn Cole, Anne Shervington Davis, James Waddy Jr. and Catherine Stansbury, event committee members; Dr. Earl S. Richardson, MSU president; Marty Resnick, MSU regent; Cheryl Hitchcock, MSU National Alumni Association president; Wilbert L. Walker, Clara Adams, former Philadelphia mayor the Rev. Dr. W. Wilson Goode Sr., Nathaniel McFadden and James Gilliam Jr., event honorees; Mark Washington, former MSU and Dallas Cowboys football player; John Griswold, Children's Service, Inc. board chair; Terry Addison, Atlas Insurance Agency president; Pennie Taylor, MBNA America Bank vice chairwoman; Victor Julien, Anheuser-Busch national events director; Elrod Hendricks, Baltimore Orioles pitching coach; Dr. Conrad William, MSU physics professor; and Bernard L. Jennings, MSU vice president of university advancement.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 1, 2011
George S. Everly Sr., former secretary-treasurer of the old Baltimore Transit Co. who also directed and played in a dance band, died Oct. 25 of renal failure at Genesis HealthCare in Severna Park. Mr. Everly, who had lived in Catonsville for more than 60 years, was 94. The son of a Baltimore Transit Co. mechanic and a homemaker, Mr. Everly was born in Baltimore and raised on his family's farm in Ilchester, and later in Ellicott City. After graduating in 1934 from Ellicott City High School, he studied accounting at the Baltimore College of Commerce, from which he graduated.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | December 15, 2005
Robert Charles Cavanaugh, a retired moving company executive, decorated World War II veteran and former longtime Roland Park resident, died of complications from emphysema Monday at the VA Hospice Care Center in Palo Alto, Calif. He was 88. Mr. Cavanaugh was born and raised in Scranton, Pa., the son of a banker. He moved to Philadelphia after his father died in the 1930s. While earning a bachelor's degree at the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business, Mr. Cavanaugh was a member of the university's Mask and Wig Club for which he composed show music.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2003
Bob Limber didn't attend any proms in high school because, he said, he couldn't dance. But yesterday, you never would have guessed that, as Limber, 83, and his wife, Marge, 77, took to the dance floor at Loyola College's 13th annual Senior Citizens' Prom. Held at McGuire Hall on campus, the prom was sponsored by the college's Student Community Service Council and featured big-band hits from a 19-piece orchestra, Mr. Dance Band. About 75 Loyola students and nearly 110 older guests attended the prom, which evoked memories of decades past for some.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | August 20, 1993
Larry O'Brien doesn't worry that the audience for big band music is dying out. As the leader of the Glenn Miller Orchestra, the 60-year-old trombonist sees too many young people swaying to the likes of "String of Pearls" and "In the Mood" to think that."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brooke Nevils and Brooke Nevils,sun reporter | November 2, 2006
Charlotte Giza, lead singer of Baltimore band Klezazz, is ready to branch out. "We're primarily a klezmer band," she says. "We play Yiddish and Hebrew songs from Eastern Europe, the kind of music that formed in small communities and came out of what was happening in their lives and really rings in your heart. We really want to get out in the community and reach people that might not know what klezmer music was." Klezazz recently performed at the Baltimore Museum of Art's First Thursday, but despite the event's success, Giza still felt something was missing.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | September 6, 2007
Albin J. Grden, a violinist, clarinetist and saxophonist who taught in Baltimore public schools for more than four decades and was a longtime member of the Baltimore City Municipal Park Band, died Aug. 30 of kidney failure at Oak Crest Village. He was 81. Mr. Grden was born in Baltimore into a musical family. His father, a Polish immigrant, played the violin, and his mother played and taught piano. "I guess Al started playing violin when he was 8 years old, and he'd practice, practice and practice," said a brother, Eugene C. Grden of White Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brooke Nevils and Brooke Nevils,sun reporter | November 2, 2006
Charlotte Giza, lead singer of Baltimore band Klezazz, is ready to branch out. "We're primarily a klezmer band," she says. "We play Yiddish and Hebrew songs from Eastern Europe, the kind of music that formed in small communities and came out of what was happening in their lives and really rings in your heart. We really want to get out in the community and reach people that might not know what klezmer music was." Klezazz recently performed at the Baltimore Museum of Art's First Thursday, but despite the event's success, Giza still felt something was missing.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | December 15, 2005
Robert Charles Cavanaugh, a retired moving company executive, decorated World War II veteran and former longtime Roland Park resident, died of complications from emphysema Monday at the VA Hospice Care Center in Palo Alto, Calif. He was 88. Mr. Cavanaugh was born and raised in Scranton, Pa., the son of a banker. He moved to Philadelphia after his father died in the 1930s. While earning a bachelor's degree at the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business, Mr. Cavanaugh was a member of the university's Mask and Wig Club for which he composed show music.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2003
Bob Limber didn't attend any proms in high school because, he said, he couldn't dance. But yesterday, you never would have guessed that, as Limber, 83, and his wife, Marge, 77, took to the dance floor at Loyola College's 13th annual Senior Citizens' Prom. Held at McGuire Hall on campus, the prom was sponsored by the college's Student Community Service Council and featured big-band hits from a 19-piece orchestra, Mr. Dance Band. About 75 Loyola students and nearly 110 older guests attended the prom, which evoked memories of decades past for some.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Morris and Lori Sears and Mike Morris and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2002
Why simply ring in the new year when you can dance it in as well? Get your kicks this New Year's Eve partying at some of the area's hippest venues. For the young, restless and dance-crazed, we've compiled a list of 25 edgy, funky and downright cool places to celebrate the new year. Unfortunately, not every place with a New Year's Eve party could be listed. But we think we've picked the most jammin' of the lot. Eclectic's the word here. There's something for every musical taste and dancing preference.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | October 22, 2000
Swags of blue and white slathered the ceiling of Hill Field House. Scores of tables covered the floor below -- crisp white -- a bunch of gold and blue balloons bobbed above each table. In a room that usually plays host to basketball games, the only group playing tonight would be a dance band -- as Morgan State University celebrated "MSU Gala XVI." Among the 1,400 MSU alumni and supporters feasting and feting: Beverly Booth Brown, event chair; Barbara Hill, Dr. Clayton Stansbury; Carolyn Cole, Anne Shervington Davis, James Waddy Jr. and Catherine Stansbury, event committee members; Dr. Earl S. Richardson, MSU president; Marty Resnick, MSU regent; Cheryl Hitchcock, MSU National Alumni Association president; Wilbert L. Walker, Clara Adams, former Philadelphia mayor the Rev. Dr. W. Wilson Goode Sr., Nathaniel McFadden and James Gilliam Jr., event honorees; Mark Washington, former MSU and Dallas Cowboys football player; John Griswold, Children's Service, Inc. board chair; Terry Addison, Atlas Insurance Agency president; Pennie Taylor, MBNA America Bank vice chairwoman; Victor Julien, Anheuser-Busch national events director; Elrod Hendricks, Baltimore Orioles pitching coach; Dr. Conrad William, MSU physics professor; and Bernard L. Jennings, MSU vice president of university advancement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | July 30, 1993
Ask New Order singer Bernard Sumner what he most looks forward to when touring, and he doesn't mince words: "Finishing the tour," he says with a laugh.It isn't that he dislikes playing, or that the songs from the group's current album, "Republic," are especially arduous to perform. As he explains over the phone from the band's home base in Manchester, England, he actually relishes the chance to get up in front of an audience."When you're onstage it's great," he says. "I do like that, don't get me wrong.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | October 18, 1994
F. Burton Hammann Jr., retired owner of the Hammann Music Co. and co-founder of a society dance band, died Oct. 11 of complications after surgery at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 87.Known as Burt, he retired in 1965 as vice president of the #F family-owned firm that was established in 1921 by his father, Frederick B. Hammann, a banjo player and musical instrument dealer.The store at 206 N. Liberty St. in Baltimore sold instruments, records and sheet music.He and his brothers, C. Gordon Hammann and R. Warren Hammann, took over the business after their father's death in 1948.
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