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Dan Quayle

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NEWS
August 30, 1991
Vice President Dan Quayle will give a speech in Baltimore Sept. 19 on "American Foreign Policy." He will speak before the Baltimore Council on Foreign Affairs at the Hyatt Regency Inner Harbor Hotel.The luncheon program will run from noon to 1:30 p.m. Reservations are required. Ticket information may be obtained by called the council at 727-2150.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | March 28, 2013
Almost exactly 20 years ago, Barbara Dafoe Whitehead wrote a controversial essay for The Atlantic titled "Dan Quayle Was Right. " In case you forgot (or never knew), let me fill you in on what Mr. Quayle was right about. There once was a popular sitcom called "Murphy Brown. " The title character, played by Candice Bergen, was a news anchor. The show had its moments, but it was also insufferably pleased with itself and its liberalism. At least until the arrival of the Aaron Sorkin oeuvre ("The West Wing," "The Newsroom")
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NEWS
By Joseph R. L. Sterne | August 13, 2000
THE American people owe a great debt to Dan Quayle. For never again is it likely that a presidential nominee will dare to pick a Dan Quayle as his running mate. This point is well taken in the selection of Dick Cheney and Joseph Lieberman this year as the Republican and Democratic vice presidential candidates, respectively. Both are mature adults with years of public service and proven good judgment. Especially in the case of Mr. Cheney, one of his major assets is that he is not Dan Quayle.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 3, 2004
WASHINGTON - The spectacle of Vice President Dick Cheney sharing equal billing with President Bush in their duet before the 9/11 commission, even if it had to be sung under wraps, was a remarkable elevation of the office of presidential stand-in. Had the first American president been hauled before an investigating committee of his day to testify about his actions, George Washington almost certainly would not have agreed to bring John Adams along, nor would the investigators likely have wanted to ask his vice president anything.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | April 16, 1999
DES MOINES, Iowa. -- In the small downtown headquarters of former Vice President Dan Quayle, his campaign manager for the 2000 Iowa precinct caucuses, Keith Fortmann, explains how his candidate will use Iowa to shed his debilitating image as a lightweight."
NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 25, 1999
At last the senators get to vote, not on how Bill goes down in history, but how they do.If you are innocent, hire Cheryl Mills and David Kendall for your lawyers. If guilty, Dale Bumpers.The Talking Head community, mystified by its inability to hound Bill from office, is meeting in executive session to determine what went wrong.Cheer up. Dan Quayle is running.Pub Date: 1/25/99
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | August 19, 1992
HOUSTON -- Let me sum up the mood of the Republican convention:If Woody Allen shows his face here, they're going to kick the living daylights out of him.No far-out, twisted, unnatural, Hollywood behavior will be tolerated here.And under far-out, twisted, unnatural, Hollywood behavior, I include living together before marriage or French kissing before the fifth date.What's normal behavior to the Republicans? Pat Boone is normal behavior.Pat Boone takes the stage in front of a gigantic American flag.
NEWS
By WILLIAM MCGURN | July 21, 1992
Washington -- Gee, you would have thought the vice president had come out against motherhood itself and not Murphy Brown the way he was treated at the Democratic Convention. Mario Cuomo didn't even wait until the opening gavel to say he would try not to use big words Dan Quayle didn't understand in his speech.Mayor David Dinkins got in his own shot about spelling. So did Gov. Zell Miller of Georgia. And at the corner of Seventh Avenue and 34th Street, hawkers peddled ''Mr. Potato Head'' T-shirts with the vice president's likeness on front.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | August 7, 1992
Jerome Styrt, a Baltimore physician, is trying to remember the last time he voted Republican."Mathias," he said. "Or McKeldin. Whichever came last."Let's see: The last time you could vote for U.S. Sen. Charles Mathias was a dozen years ago and the last time you could vote for Baltimore Mayor Theodore McKeldin was something like 30 years ago.How about president? I asked. You ever vote for a Republican president?"No, never," Styrt said.Why not?"Don't get me started," he said. "I am a man of very gentle feelings: all violent."
NEWS
May 9, 1991
"Mr. President" a reporter asked at yesterday's press conference, "what do you say to the pundits who suggested that as a result of your health scare over the weekend, you might reconsider keeping Dan Quayle on the ticket next year?" George Bush replied, "Do you want it by hand or do you want it by word? No, no! I'm no Nelson Rockefeller."Before President Bush's weekend hospitalization, we had tTC prepared an editorial with the above headline that concluded, "We remain as convinced today as we were in 1988 that George Bush owes it to the nation and to history to get himself a new running mate.
NEWS
By Joseph R. L. Sterne | August 13, 2000
THE American people owe a great debt to Dan Quayle. For never again is it likely that a presidential nominee will dare to pick a Dan Quayle as his running mate. This point is well taken in the selection of Dick Cheney and Joseph Lieberman this year as the Republican and Democratic vice presidential candidates, respectively. Both are mature adults with years of public service and proven good judgment. Especially in the case of Mr. Cheney, one of his major assets is that he is not Dan Quayle.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | July 28, 2000
WASHINGTON -- In a way, Dick Cheney can probably thank not only George W. Bush for his selection to be George W. Bush's running mate. He can also thank Dan Quayle. The fiasco that resulted in 1988 when the Texas governor's father chose Mr. Quayle to run on the GOP ticket with him was one that Mr. Bush's strategists wanted no part of. George W. said it simply from the start in declaring that the individual he would choose had to be someone "who could be president." It was a description that Mr. Quayle in 1988 seemed not to fill from the memorable moment the senior George Bush picked him -- and got himself nearly hugged to death on a New Orleans dock by his ecstatic choice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,Special to the Sun | November 28, 1999
In a new book ("Edward M. Kennedy: A Biography," William Morrow, 692 pages, $27.50), Adam Clymer says Kennedy is the most outstanding senator of the century. He slightly qualifies that assessment with this: "Robert F. Wagner is probably Kennedy's most credible rival [as a legislator]." And he says that while Hubert Humphrey and Robert A. Taft were national political leaders in Kennedy's class, they weren't senators for as long. Clymer also thinks Arthur Vandenberg, Everett Dirksen and J. William Fulbright are significant also-rans for "moments" of greatness.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 25, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Bashing the Federal Reserve for keeping interest rates too high has been a populist Democratic staple for decades, a political mantra as well worn as raising the minimum wage or saving Social Security.But the most liberal wing of the Democratic Party now has some unlikely company in its rhetorical wars against federal monetary policy: conservative Republicans on the presidential campaign trail.The rhetoric of three presidential hopefuls -- Steve Forbes, Gary Bauer and Dan Quayle -- has amused some Democrats and raised concerned eyebrows in the pro-Republican business community that has been wildly supportive of Alan Greenspan, the Federal Reserve chairman.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | May 9, 1999
REPUBLICANS in Maryland have a rare opportunity to break out of the box that has prevented them from winning statewide offices. But such a dramatic step would threaten the status quo, something that alarms many dedicated party officials.Without bold action, the state GOP seems consigned to permanent minority-party status. Democrats have a big edge in voter registration, a lock on top state posts and a deep bench of polished local officeholders eager to continue Democratic dominance.In the face of such overwhelming odds, it is not surprising that the GOP's strongest gubernatorial candidate in 30 years, Ellen Sauerbrey, got run over by a fast-moving Democratic freight train driven by Gov. Parris Glendening last November.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | April 16, 1999
DES MOINES, Iowa. -- In the small downtown headquarters of former Vice President Dan Quayle, his campaign manager for the 2000 Iowa precinct caucuses, Keith Fortmann, explains how his candidate will use Iowa to shed his debilitating image as a lightweight."
NEWS
By Bradford Jacobs | September 25, 1991
HAMLET" is probably the toughest of all stage roles, but vice president of the United States comes a close second and, the other day, J. Danforth Quayle blew it badly. The poor fellow doesn't know how to play vice president at all.We all know the script. The veep comes on as an amiable duffer, a combine of Hubert Humphrey and Jerry Ford. He's smirky, irresponsible, a political punching bag. He says something nice about the city. He tells a fairly funny story, preferably on himself. Loyally, he grinds out a little speech slung together for him by the second-string White House speech writer.
NEWS
By Roger Simon | August 3, 1992
Simon Says:Nobody who doesn't own a horse should own a cowboy hat.*If it were much more fun to earn money rather than spend it, most of our problems would be solved.*You can tell a lot about a person by where he sets the buttons on his car radio.*Why do so many of the young women Olympic gymnasts look so unhappy? Could it be that they are?*Washington Whispers: George Bush left the door open for Dan Quayle to step off the Republican ticket, but Quayle declined to walk through it. (Marilyn would have killed him.)
NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 25, 1999
At last the senators get to vote, not on how Bill goes down in history, but how they do.If you are innocent, hire Cheryl Mills and David Kendall for your lawyers. If guilty, Dale Bumpers.The Talking Head community, mystified by its inability to hound Bill from office, is meeting in executive session to determine what went wrong.Cheer up. Dan Quayle is running.Pub Date: 1/25/99
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | May 31, 1996
BOSTON -- Forgive me for being a contrarian, but Dan Quayle was not right.It's been four years, one presidential election and two book tours since that famous "Murphy Brown" speech. Today, anyone who wants to be allowed onto the family values bandwagon has to repeat the same contrite password: "Dan Quayle was right."But due to a penchant for history, and access to electronic archives, I must opt out.Dan Quayle was wrong when he said that "Murphy Brown -- a character who supposedly epitomizes today's intelligent, highly paid, professional woman -- mocked the importance of fathers by bearing a child alone and calling it just another lifestyle choice."
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