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Damon Runyon

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NEWS
June 1, 1997
Born Alfred Damon Runyan, his mother died by the time he was seven years old. His father supported the family in Colorado by writing for the Pueblo Evening Post, but exercised little control over his young son. Runyon spent his early adolescence in gangs and running messages in the red light district.At 15, he started writing alongside his father, and when an editor misspelled the younger's name, he kept the change. Later in his career another editor, at the New York American, found the three-name byline pretentious and removed Alfred.
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NEWS
June 1, 1997
Born Alfred Damon Runyan, his mother died by the time he was seven years old. His father supported the family in Colorado by writing for the Pueblo Evening Post, but exercised little control over his young son. Runyon spent his early adolescence in gangs and running messages in the red light district.At 15, he started writing alongside his father, and when an editor misspelled the younger's name, he kept the change. Later in his career another editor, at the New York American, found the three-name byline pretentious and removed Alfred.
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FEATURES
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1994
Even back then, when he was still creating with words the enchanted Broadway that would become internationally celebrated through Frank Loesser's beloved musical, "Guys and Dolls," Damon Runyon was himself perplexed, and maybe a little off-put, by all the fuss about "Runyonesque characters" and the question, posed by interlopers, of what made one. He wrote about this sometime, as best I can tell, in the early 1940s."
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | May 2, 1997
THE NATION'S FIRST great urban newspaper columnist was born in Chicago, the city that now mourns the death of one of the last nationally acclaimed exemplars of the breed, Mike Royko.At the beginning of this century, the columns of Finley Peter Dunne first gave voice to the sardonic, pointed opinions of the burgeoning ranks of city-dwellers, embodied by Dunne's wily, Irish-born barkeep, Mr. Dooley. For the past 34 years, Mr. Royko had been a sort of latter-day Dooley, incisively dissecting and pungently assessing the politics and people of Chicago -- and the rest of the country, too.His death is a loss not only to his native city but to the entire nation.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 21, 1995
At least the top Republicans can't do too much mischief in Washington as long as they stay up in New Hampshire.Willie Runyon is not Damon Runyon.
NEWS
By John Schulian and John Schulian,Los Angeles Times | October 13, 1991
DAMON RUNYON. Jimmy Breslin. Ticknor & Fields. 410 pages. $24.95. When you look at the gray tapioca that American newspapers have become, it's hard to believe they ever spawned Damon Runyon, who covered his first hanging at 11 and grew up to create Broadway by populating it with Nicely-Nicely and Harry the Horse, Madame La Gimp, Nathan Detroit and Little Miss Marker.But Runyon (1884-1946) lived in an age when a reporter could drink with a ballplayer named Bugs one day and go to the track with Pancho Villa the next.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 18, 1993
As 85,495 racing fans at Pimlico, several of them still more or less solvent, watched the 118th running of the Preakness Saturday, we headed for Washington to surround ourselves with horse players the likes of whom no longer exist and maybe never did.At the John F. Kennedy Center, they were showing the immortal stage production "Guys and Dolls," drawn from Damon Runyon's stable of characters with names such as Sky Masterson, Nathan Detroit, Miss Adelaide the...
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | November 4, 1991
DAMON RUNYON: A LIFE. By Jimmy Breslin. Ticknor & Fields. 410 pages. $24.95. EARLY IN 1983, Jimmy Breslin sat in Costello's, an old New York City pub, drank a pot of espresso, smoked a cigar and denied he had ever read any of Damon Runyon's columns when he was a kid."No, and he was terrible, too, by the way," Breslin said. "He got away with murder."Since then, Breslin has read a lot of Runyon's columns and short stories. He also has changed his mind. He now considers Runyon "a major writer," a columnist who performed the nearly impossible task of putting "a smile into a newspaper," and a man whose "characters became known as Runyonesque, a word that is one of the dozen most descriptive words today."
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | May 2, 1997
THE NATION'S FIRST great urban newspaper columnist was born in Chicago, the city that now mourns the death of one of the last nationally acclaimed exemplars of the breed, Mike Royko.At the beginning of this century, the columns of Finley Peter Dunne first gave voice to the sardonic, pointed opinions of the burgeoning ranks of city-dwellers, embodied by Dunne's wily, Irish-born barkeep, Mr. Dooley. For the past 34 years, Mr. Royko had been a sort of latter-day Dooley, incisively dissecting and pungently assessing the politics and people of Chicago -- and the rest of the country, too.His death is a loss not only to his native city but to the entire nation.
FEATURES
By John Schulian | April 11, 1993
I used to see her dancing in the front window of one of those joints on The Block -- a vision with a chest out to here and cheekbones that were a sculptor's dream. Sometimes she called herself Candy, sometimes Crystal. It has always been like that in places where for the price of a champagne split a girl will slip into a rear booth with a visiting fireman or a local on the sneak. The smart ones, the ones who survive, never let the suckers know who they really are, and they never let themselves forget.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 21, 1995
At least the top Republicans can't do too much mischief in Washington as long as they stay up in New Hampshire.Willie Runyon is not Damon Runyon.
FEATURES
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1994
Even back then, when he was still creating with words the enchanted Broadway that would become internationally celebrated through Frank Loesser's beloved musical, "Guys and Dolls," Damon Runyon was himself perplexed, and maybe a little off-put, by all the fuss about "Runyonesque characters" and the question, posed by interlopers, of what made one. He wrote about this sometime, as best I can tell, in the early 1940s."
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 18, 1993
As 85,495 racing fans at Pimlico, several of them still more or less solvent, watched the 118th running of the Preakness Saturday, we headed for Washington to surround ourselves with horse players the likes of whom no longer exist and maybe never did.At the John F. Kennedy Center, they were showing the immortal stage production "Guys and Dolls," drawn from Damon Runyon's stable of characters with names such as Sky Masterson, Nathan Detroit, Miss Adelaide the...
FEATURES
By John Schulian | April 11, 1993
I used to see her dancing in the front window of one of those joints on The Block -- a vision with a chest out to here and cheekbones that were a sculptor's dream. Sometimes she called herself Candy, sometimes Crystal. It has always been like that in places where for the price of a champagne split a girl will slip into a rear booth with a visiting fireman or a local on the sneak. The smart ones, the ones who survive, never let the suckers know who they really are, and they never let themselves forget.
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | November 4, 1991
DAMON RUNYON: A LIFE. By Jimmy Breslin. Ticknor & Fields. 410 pages. $24.95. EARLY IN 1983, Jimmy Breslin sat in Costello's, an old New York City pub, drank a pot of espresso, smoked a cigar and denied he had ever read any of Damon Runyon's columns when he was a kid."No, and he was terrible, too, by the way," Breslin said. "He got away with murder."Since then, Breslin has read a lot of Runyon's columns and short stories. He also has changed his mind. He now considers Runyon "a major writer," a columnist who performed the nearly impossible task of putting "a smile into a newspaper," and a man whose "characters became known as Runyonesque, a word that is one of the dozen most descriptive words today."
NEWS
By John Schulian and John Schulian,Los Angeles Times | October 13, 1991
DAMON RUNYON. Jimmy Breslin. Ticknor & Fields. 410 pages. $24.95. When you look at the gray tapioca that American newspapers have become, it's hard to believe they ever spawned Damon Runyon, who covered his first hanging at 11 and grew up to create Broadway by populating it with Nicely-Nicely and Harry the Horse, Madame La Gimp, Nathan Detroit and Little Miss Marker.But Runyon (1884-1946) lived in an age when a reporter could drink with a ballplayer named Bugs one day and go to the track with Pancho Villa the next.
NEWS
April 3, 2005
St. Paul's Players will present The Music Man at 8 p.m. April 15, 16 and 22 and at 3 p.m. April 17 and 24 in the fellowship hall of St. Paul's Lutheran Church, 201 Mount Royal Ave. and Route 22 in Aberdeen. Tickets are $12 for adults and seniors, and $6 for children through high school. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation. For more information, call Mike Bareham at 410-272-3111, or Gail Bareham at 410-515-7767. Reservations: 410-734-7429.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 19, 1999
Maurice Hines stars as Nathan Detroit in director Charles Randolph-Wright's racially mixed revival of the classic 1950 musical "Guys and Dolls," currently in previews at Washington's Arena Stage.The Abe Burrows-Jo Swerling-Frank Loesser musical, based on the stories of Damon Runyon, focuses on the unlikely connection between a group of underworld gamblers and the do-gooders at the Save-a-Soul Mission.Hines plays Nathan Detroit, proprietor of "the oldest established permanent floating crap game in New York."
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