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Dame Of Maryland

FEATURES
July 7, 1991
Andrew Harrison Kitt of Towson, the son of Malcolm R. Kitt and Wendy Mopsik, graduated magna cum laude from Georgetown University in Washington.*Charles McLaughlin of Baltimore was recently awarded a two-year scholarship to study visual communications at the Art Institute of Philadelphia.*Felecia Egbe of Paul Laurence Dunbar Middle School won the Maryland Nutrition Education Award.*Christine McGuire of Rosedale received a summer researc fellowship at the National Institute of Drug Addiction.
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NEWS
September 28, 1995
CONGRATULATIONS to the College of Notre Dame of Maryland on its 100th anniversary. It enters its second century a peppy and confident representative of a dwindling species, the 84 remaining women's colleges in the country. It does so expansive in its role, sure of its self.The small residential Catholic college for women was a vanishing breed when Notre Dame and its constituents looked its future in the face a quarter-century ago. But thanks to the resolve of its leaders, the loyalty of donors and clear purpose of students, Notre Dame has retained and expanded its mission.
NEWS
October 29, 2005
Sister Mary Dolores Linsenmeyer, a retired educator and a member of the School Sisters of Notre Dame, died of a cerebral thrombosis Monday at Villa Assumpta, her order's motherhouse in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County. She was 94. Born Theresa Katherine Linsenmeyer in Curtis Bay, she attended city public schools. Two months after graduating from the Institute of Notre Dame in 1929, she entered the School Sisters of Notre Dame, and professed her vows in 1932. Sister Dolores taught at parochial schools in Washington and Ridgewood, N.Y., before being sent in 1935 to Puerto Rico, where she taught until 1945.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2001
Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley delivered a stern warning yesterday at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland's commencement: Beware the "box people." These are the people, he said, who form a "thin little crust of society" that stifles enthusiasm and creativity. They lurk in city agencies and newspaper editorial boards, prepared to give "four automatic answers" when confronted with innovative ideas. O'Malley told the college's 553 graduates that they're likely to hear these responses as they enter the workplace or continue their careers: "That won't work in Baltimore.
NEWS
July 27, 2003
Consultant picked to study school construction funds The Harford County Board of Estimates approved a contract last week for a consultant to study potential revenue sources for school construction. The $8,500 award was given to Tischler & Associates Inc. of Bethesda. The vote followed discussions among County Executive James M. Harkins, County Council members and members of the Harford County delegation to the General Assembly about financing school construction. The consultant will issue a study, "Capital Facilities Revenue Reconnaissance," analyzing alternatives for increasing funding for school construction in the capital budget.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2004
Pauline A. Marsh, a former nurse who worked at the Federal Reserve Bank in Baltimore for nearly 25 years, died in her sleep of heart failure Monday at Union Memorial Hospital. She was 73 and lived in Yale Heights. Born Pauline A. Roberts in the city's Pimlico section, she graduated from Western High School in 1950. She received her nursing certificate from the Church Home and Hospital nursing school two years later. She became a night supervisor at the hospital after graduation. She then became an occupational-health nurse with the Baltimore branch of the Federal Reserve Bank in the early 1970s, where she attended to small, on-the-job injuries and also served as an informal in-house psychologist, said her daughter, Emily Marsh of Mayfield.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | December 20, 1999
A historic and controversial piece of Baltimore's artistic heritage is getting a new home next year on the campus of the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, thanks to a local group dedicated to preserving the works of one of the city's most prolific mural painters.The mural, titled "Baltimore in 1837, When the Sun was Founded," is a 12-by-52-foot painting by Baltimore artist R. McGill Mackall, who completed the work in 1953 for the front lobby of The Sun's North Calvert Street building, which had opened three years earlier.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Aaron Chester and Brad Schleicher | November 15, 2007
International music Music of Spain and South America makes its way to the College of Notre Dame of Maryland on Saturday. The concert will feature guitarist Ronald Pearl and soprano Carolyn Black-Sotir. The concert is at 7 p.m. Saturday in Marikle Chapel of the Annunciation, College of Notre Dame of Maryland, 4701 N. Charles St. Call 410-532-5386 or go to ndm.edu.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1995
Susannah D. B. C. Federico, an artist, a poet and a scion of the Cockey family that settled Cockeysville, died Tuesday of complications of leukemia at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. She was 66.The former Susannah Delilah Brown Cockey was married in 1956 to Anthony S. Federico Sr., an attorney, and lived in Homeland.She was a longtime volunteer at Union Memorial Hospital, St. Joseph Medical Center and Hospice, and the old Veterans Hospital on Loch Raven Boulevard, where she taught art to the patients.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2005
Sister Marie Xavier Looymans, who instructed prospective elementary school teachers for more than three decades at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, died of pneumonia Monday -- her 91st birthday -- at St. Joseph Medical Center. Born Frances Ann Looymans in Baltimore, she grew up on 22nd Street and attended St. Ann's parochial school, where she was taught by the School Sisters of Notre Dame, the order she later entered. After her 1932 graduation from the Institute of Notre Dame, she earned a teaching certificate from what is now Towson University.
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