Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDame Of Maryland
IN THE NEWS

Dame Of Maryland

NEWS
October 6, 1999
Justin U. Thomas, 27, tire technician, studentJustin U. Thomas, a Coppin State College student and tire company employee, died of a gunshot wound Sept. 29 at Maryland Shock Trauma Center. He was 27 and lived in West Baltimore.Mr. Thomas was a victim of a random shooting. The incident occurred Sept. 29 in the 1000 block of W. Baltimore St., and is being investigated by police.He was a tire technician for Klausmeyer Tire Inc., where he specialized in changing tires on aircraft and heavy equipment.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 28, 1995
CONGRATULATIONS to the College of Notre Dame of Maryland on its 100th anniversary. It enters its second century a peppy and confident representative of a dwindling species, the 84 remaining women's colleges in the country. It does so expansive in its role, sure of its self.The small residential Catholic college for women was a vanishing breed when Notre Dame and its constituents looked its future in the face a quarter-century ago. But thanks to the resolve of its leaders, the loyalty of donors and clear purpose of students, Notre Dame has retained and expanded its mission.
NEWS
October 29, 2005
Sister Mary Dolores Linsenmeyer, a retired educator and a member of the School Sisters of Notre Dame, died of a cerebral thrombosis Monday at Villa Assumpta, her order's motherhouse in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County. She was 94. Born Theresa Katherine Linsenmeyer in Curtis Bay, she attended city public schools. Two months after graduating from the Institute of Notre Dame in 1929, she entered the School Sisters of Notre Dame, and professed her vows in 1932. Sister Dolores taught at parochial schools in Washington and Ridgewood, N.Y., before being sent in 1935 to Puerto Rico, where she taught until 1945.
NEWS
July 27, 2003
Consultant picked to study school construction funds The Harford County Board of Estimates approved a contract last week for a consultant to study potential revenue sources for school construction. The $8,500 award was given to Tischler & Associates Inc. of Bethesda. The vote followed discussions among County Executive James M. Harkins, County Council members and members of the Harford County delegation to the General Assembly about financing school construction. The consultant will issue a study, "Capital Facilities Revenue Reconnaissance," analyzing alternatives for increasing funding for school construction in the capital budget.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | January 31, 2007
The art of landscape is by definition poetic and symbolical. We respond to pictures of field and forest, mountain and sea because the varied moods of nature somehow seem to echo our innermost thoughts and feelings. Landscape as metaphor is a recurring motif in Terra Incognito/Terra Cognito, an exhibition of recent works by painter Ruth Pettus and photographer Michela Caudill at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. Pettus' atmospheric ink drawings and Caudill's spare, black-and-white photographs are mounted on opposing walls, where they activate a subtle visual dialog between the two media.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Aaron Chester and Brad Schleicher | November 15, 2007
International music Music of Spain and South America makes its way to the College of Notre Dame of Maryland on Saturday. The concert will feature guitarist Ronald Pearl and soprano Carolyn Black-Sotir. The concert is at 7 p.m. Saturday in Marikle Chapel of the Annunciation, College of Notre Dame of Maryland, 4701 N. Charles St. Call 410-532-5386 or go to ndm.edu.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1995
Susannah D. B. C. Federico, an artist, a poet and a scion of the Cockey family that settled Cockeysville, died Tuesday of complications of leukemia at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. She was 66.The former Susannah Delilah Brown Cockey was married in 1956 to Anthony S. Federico Sr., an attorney, and lived in Homeland.She was a longtime volunteer at Union Memorial Hospital, St. Joseph Medical Center and Hospice, and the old Veterans Hospital on Loch Raven Boulevard, where she taught art to the patients.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2005
Sister Marie Xavier Looymans, who instructed prospective elementary school teachers for more than three decades at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, died of pneumonia Monday -- her 91st birthday -- at St. Joseph Medical Center. Born Frances Ann Looymans in Baltimore, she grew up on 22nd Street and attended St. Ann's parochial school, where she was taught by the School Sisters of Notre Dame, the order she later entered. After her 1932 graduation from the Institute of Notre Dame, she earned a teaching certificate from what is now Towson University.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | February 25, 1991
A. Samuel Penn, the head of a special Governor's Insurance Commission to investigate insurance issues, will become the number-two person at the state's insurance division, according to William A. Fogle Jr., Secretary of the Department of Licensing and Regulation."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | February 3, 2002
The next program from the Concert Artists of Baltimore, planned long before the September tragedy unleashed a fresh wave of patriotism, seems doubly appropriate now. This "American Sampler," conducted by Edward Polochick, offers quite a cross-section of the country's rich reservoir of music. Among the attractions will be Aaron Copland's Clarinet Concerto, with its exquisitely smooth, lyrical fusion of jazz and classical idioms; David Drosinos will be the soloist. And there will be a rare opportunity to hear Darker America, a 1924 symphonic poem by the great African-American composer William Grant Still, whose output has been absurdly neglected.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.