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By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | April 2, 1996
DALLAS -- Michael Irvin should stand trial on two drug possession charges from a March 4 bust at an Irving hotel, a grand jury decided yesterday.The Dallas Cowboys star had no comment as he left the Lew Sterrett Justice Center after posting $5,500 bond. His attorney, Kevin Clancy, said the 31-year-old All-Pro wide receiver would fight the charges."He'll plead not guilty," Clancy said.The most serious indictment against Irvin is for cocaine possession, a second-degree felony that carries a sentence of up to 20 years in prison and a $10,000 fine.
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NEWS
June 8, 2007
JIM CLARK, 84 Confronted rights marchers Former Dallas County (Ala.) Sheriff Jim Clark, whose violent confrontations with voting rights marchers in Selma in 1965 shocked the nation and gave momentum to the civil rights movement, died Monday at an Elba, Ala., nursing home after years of declining health due to a stroke and heart surgery, Hayes Funeral Home officials said. Mr. Clark was voted out of office in 1966 in large measure because of opposition from newly registered black voters, but throughout his life he maintained he had done the right thing.
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NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | December 15, 2000
DALLAS - Their nerves frayed after being forced to quit smoking cold turkey, inmates at Dallas County jails are taking out their frustrations on one another. Fights at the jails have tripled since Sheriff Jim Bowles banned jailhouse smoking in October, department officials said. At least two detention officers have quit their jobs after investigations revealed they were smuggling in cigarettes and other tobacco products, jail officials said. One of the officers sold tobacco and rolling paper to inmates, and another gave an inmate cigarettes in exchange for items from the commissary.
NEWS
January 23, 2007
The Supreme Court has rightly refused to block the trial of seven Los Angeles residents accused of contributing funds to an Iranian opposition movement that the State Department has branded a terrorist group. The high court let stand a ruling by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that prosecuting the defendants - who are innocent until proved guilty - posed no First Amendment problem. As Judge Andrew J. Kleinfeld pithily put it: "Sometimes money serves as a proxy for speech, and sometimes it buys goods and services that are not speech.
NEWS
January 23, 2007
The Supreme Court has rightly refused to block the trial of seven Los Angeles residents accused of contributing funds to an Iranian opposition movement that the State Department has branded a terrorist group. The high court let stand a ruling by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that prosecuting the defendants - who are innocent until proved guilty - posed no First Amendment problem. As Judge Andrew J. Kleinfeld pithily put it: "Sometimes money serves as a proxy for speech, and sometimes it buys goods and services that are not speech.
FEATURES
By Jeffrey Weiss and Jeffrey Weiss,Dallas Morning News | April 23, 1991
DALLAS -- This time, the president's seat was empty.But the vacant place in the stretch limousine seemed to fit the surreal atmosphere. The replica of John F. Kennedy's presidential car joined other vintage vehicles for the first of what will be dozens of re-enactments of the assassination over the next two weeks.Production of "JFK," a movie based on the assassination of President Kennedy, started last Monday. Workers unloaded the first equipment from trucks shortly before 7 a.m. The first rehearsal of the presidential motorcade started more than eight hours later -- along the same stretch of roadway where the president was killed Nov. 22, 1963.
NEWS
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1996
Lauri Haavistola was a pilot out of work when the call came. Would he be interested in flying Palestine Liberation Organization Chairman Yasser Arafat about the world?Haavistola, a Cecil County resident, signed on and, he says, worked for two years as a flight engineer and pilot aboard Arafat's personal aircraft.But in October, while a Lockheed Jetstar II flown for Arafat was in Dallas for maintenance work at K.C. Aviation near Love Field, the PLO stopped paying Haavistola's $6,000 monthly salary and expenses, he alleges in a lawsuit filed this week in Dallas County court.
NEWS
June 8, 2007
JIM CLARK, 84 Confronted rights marchers Former Dallas County (Ala.) Sheriff Jim Clark, whose violent confrontations with voting rights marchers in Selma in 1965 shocked the nation and gave momentum to the civil rights movement, died Monday at an Elba, Ala., nursing home after years of declining health due to a stroke and heart surgery, Hayes Funeral Home officials said. Mr. Clark was voted out of office in 1966 in large measure because of opposition from newly registered black voters, but throughout his life he maintained he had done the right thing.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Ivan Penn contributed to this article | November 26, 1996
After its first six months, a Howard County courts program in which jurors can donate daily stipends to aid foster care children has not yielded nearly as much money as expected -- so officials are preparing a publicity blitz.Before the program began, county officials conducted a survey that indicated that 50 percent of jurors would be willing to donate their fees of $10 to $20 a day. But so far, court officials say, only about 25 percent of those called for jury duty opt to participate.Since May, only about $3,000 has been collected.
TOPIC
By Selwyn Crawford | October 1, 2000
SELMA, Ala. - To outsiders, 47-year-old computer consultant James Perkins Jr. is noteworthy because he is about to become the first black mayor of Selma. Perkins' election will end the 36-year mayoral reign of Joe T. Smitherman, who many residents view as a living symbol of racial segregation. And many of Selma's black citizens view Perkins' election as much more than a change in leadership. In this infamous central Alabama community where law enforcement officers once beat blacks bloody before national TV cameras for seeking the right to vote, Perkins is being hailed as an emancipator of biblical proportions.
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | December 15, 2000
DALLAS - Their nerves frayed after being forced to quit smoking cold turkey, inmates at Dallas County jails are taking out their frustrations on one another. Fights at the jails have tripled since Sheriff Jim Bowles banned jailhouse smoking in October, department officials said. At least two detention officers have quit their jobs after investigations revealed they were smuggling in cigarettes and other tobacco products, jail officials said. One of the officers sold tobacco and rolling paper to inmates, and another gave an inmate cigarettes in exchange for items from the commissary.
TOPIC
By Selwyn Crawford | October 1, 2000
SELMA, Ala. - To outsiders, 47-year-old computer consultant James Perkins Jr. is noteworthy because he is about to become the first black mayor of Selma. Perkins' election will end the 36-year mayoral reign of Joe T. Smitherman, who many residents view as a living symbol of racial segregation. And many of Selma's black citizens view Perkins' election as much more than a change in leadership. In this infamous central Alabama community where law enforcement officers once beat blacks bloody before national TV cameras for seeking the right to vote, Perkins is being hailed as an emancipator of biblical proportions.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Ivan Penn contributed to this article | November 26, 1996
After its first six months, a Howard County courts program in which jurors can donate daily stipends to aid foster care children has not yielded nearly as much money as expected -- so officials are preparing a publicity blitz.Before the program began, county officials conducted a survey that indicated that 50 percent of jurors would be willing to donate their fees of $10 to $20 a day. But so far, court officials say, only about 25 percent of those called for jury duty opt to participate.Since May, only about $3,000 has been collected.
NEWS
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1996
Lauri Haavistola was a pilot out of work when the call came. Would he be interested in flying Palestine Liberation Organization Chairman Yasser Arafat about the world?Haavistola, a Cecil County resident, signed on and, he says, worked for two years as a flight engineer and pilot aboard Arafat's personal aircraft.But in October, while a Lockheed Jetstar II flown for Arafat was in Dallas for maintenance work at K.C. Aviation near Love Field, the PLO stopped paying Haavistola's $6,000 monthly salary and expenses, he alleges in a lawsuit filed this week in Dallas County court.
SPORTS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | April 2, 1996
DALLAS -- Michael Irvin should stand trial on two drug possession charges from a March 4 bust at an Irving hotel, a grand jury decided yesterday.The Dallas Cowboys star had no comment as he left the Lew Sterrett Justice Center after posting $5,500 bond. His attorney, Kevin Clancy, said the 31-year-old All-Pro wide receiver would fight the charges."He'll plead not guilty," Clancy said.The most serious indictment against Irvin is for cocaine possession, a second-degree felony that carries a sentence of up to 20 years in prison and a $10,000 fine.
FEATURES
By Jeffrey Weiss and Jeffrey Weiss,Dallas Morning News | April 23, 1991
DALLAS -- This time, the president's seat was empty.But the vacant place in the stretch limousine seemed to fit the surreal atmosphere. The replica of John F. Kennedy's presidential car joined other vintage vehicles for the first of what will be dozens of re-enactments of the assassination over the next two weeks.Production of "JFK," a movie based on the assassination of President Kennedy, started last Monday. Workers unloaded the first equipment from trucks shortly before 7 a.m. The first rehearsal of the presidential motorcade started more than eight hours later -- along the same stretch of roadway where the president was killed Nov. 22, 1963.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 19, 1993
SHADY SHORES, Texas -- Wrestler Kerry Von Erich Adkisson, member of a star-crossed wrestling family that had already lost four of its sons, died yesterday of a bullet wound that was apparently self-inflicted.Mr. Adkisson, 33, a well-known wrestler dubbed "the Texas Tornado," was found dead about 2:50 p.m. by his father, Jack Adkisson, who also wrestled professionally for several years under the name Fritz Von Erich and raised a family of wrestling stars.He apparently used a gun he had given his father two Christmases ago.Kerry Adkisson was only the second of six sons still alive since a string of tragedies began in 1959.
NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | January 10, 2011
In the wake of Saturday's attempted assassination of Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, there will be calls to cool the passions and rhetoric of political extremists on both sides of the American ideological spectrum. It's true that the nation's increasingly polarized discourse includes both liberals and conservatives with sharp tongues and even sharper elbows. But when it comes to veiled and not-so-veiled calls for violence, there is a glaring and undeniable asymmetry: It is almost always conservatives who incite, condone and even engage in violence as a "legitimate" means of political expression.
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