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NEWS
March 26, 1991
Theodore WhitfieldCivil War authorityA memorial service for Dr. Theodore M. Whitfield, emeritus professor of history at Western Maryland College and an expert on the Civil War, will be held at noon tomorrow at the Westminster Baptist Church.Dr. Whitfield, who was 85 and lived in Westminster, died Thursday at the Carroll County General Hospital after a long illness.He retired in 1971 after teaching at Western Maryland since 1929.Dr. Whitfield edited the papers of several families in the South, conducted studies and wrote essays about antebellum slave revolts in Virginia and about slavery and its relation to Southern church history.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | July 13, 2007
In an industry that is the essence of routine, David and Kate Dallam are undergoing a radical lifestyle change. After 16 years of adhering to a rigid milking schedule on their Harford County dairy farm, the Dallams no longer must rise at dawn with the cows. They can go out to dinner or catch one of their children's ballgames without rushing home. David Dallam can spend more time in the fields, and Kate can tend their ice cream store. After all, the robot minds the herd. The Dallams, who run Brooms Bloom Dairy, a 240-acre farm in Creswell, recently installed a $180,000 computerized system that milks the cows, tracks yield data -- even keeps the cows calm.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
Manchester Valley's girls lacrosse team couldn't have believed bigger. The No. 8 Mavericks relied on their season motto, "Believe Big," to build a six-goal lead in the first half and hold off a late rally from No. 15 Fallston to win their first state championship, the Class 2A-1A title, 13-10, Tuesday night at UMBC. The last two seasons have been emotional for the Mavericks (18-1) after losing assistant coach Devin Spence in an automobile accident in February 2013 and after coach Shelly Brezicki lost her brother, volunteer fireman Gene Kirchner, three months later from injuries suffered in a fire.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | December 16, 1998
Marianne Thomas of Bend, Ore., writes that she remembers the Depression years and a spicy cake that was "our favorite." It was a nameless cake that had "chocolate (maybe cocoa) and nuts. The frosting was fluffy and contained coffee as well as chocolate. Can you find such a recipe?"Kathy Dallam of Bel Air sent the response chosen by tester Laura Reiley. Dallam wrote:"My mother-in-law, Louise Ackerman, always made this cake for my husband's birthday when he was growing up. Here's her recipe, unchanged.
NEWS
August 23, 1994
* Jackson P. Dallam, a retired autoworker, died Saturday of cancer at a nursing home in Aiken, S.C. He was 82 and had moved to Aiken in 1985 from Fallston. The Baltimore native attended the McDonogh School and City College. His first wife, the former Peggy Standiford, died in 1972. Services were set for 10 a.m. today at the Ruck Towson Funeral Home, 1050 York Road. He is survived by his second wife, the former Pauline Shaw; three daughters, Barbara Dill of Fallston, Jacquelyn Stewart of Forest Hill and Kathryn Shaw of Novi, Mich.
NEWS
October 11, 2002
Mary Heaps Costello, 85, educator, homemaker Mary Heaps Costello, a former educator and homemaker, died Monday at Union Memorial Hospital from complications of open-heart surgery. She was 85. Mrs. Costello, who resided in recent years in Madison, N.J., and earlier at the Dulaney Valley Apartments in Towson, was born Mary Heaps in Cardiff, Harford County. She received a bachelor's degree in English in 1938 from the University of Maryland in College Park, where she was also the first female editor of The Diamondback, the university's campus newspaper.
NEWS
By Lucie L. Snodgrass and Lucie L. Snodgrass,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 27, 2002
Bel Air's Saturday farmers' market, at 27 one of the oldest in the state, is a standout in many ways. Brimming with colorful fruits, vegetables, plants and other locally grown or made products from April to October, it consistently ranks as one of the state's Top 10 markets in attendance. It is also, according to Tony Evans, coordinator of farmers' markets at the Maryland Department of Agriculture, the only market in the state where compost is sold or where, for the first time this year, local beef is for sale.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | July 12, 1992
A headline in last Sunday's Harford County Sun incorrectly listed the auction price of Steven R. Hankins' estate. Prospective buyers would have had to pay their bid plus $894,919.The 282-acre historic Bel Air estate of bankrupt developer Steven R. Hankins went unsold at a public auction Friday.About three dozen potential bidders and observers gathered outside the estate's vacant 200-year-old house near Bel Air for the afternoon auction.The buyer would have had to pay a bid plus the $894,919 that Mr. Hankins and his wife, Susan, owe on the estate's mortgage within 10 days of the auction.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1996
Jackson is chosen president-elect of brokers associationH. Bernie Jackson Jr., president and chief executive officer of Bernett and Jackson Realty, was chosen president-elect of the National Association of Real Estate Brokers Inc. during the group's recent 49th annual convention in Houston.A Realtor since 1976, Jackson specializes in property management. He is a member of the Real Estate Brokers of Baltimore Inc., the National Society of Real Estate Appraisers, the Baltimore City Chamber of Commerce, the Property Owners Association of Greater Baltimore and the Real Estate Management Brokers Institute.
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | October 20, 1991
"It's a transformation. It's like Cinderella," says Mrs. John E. Dallam, publicity chairman for the Huntingdon Antiques Show and Sale.She refers to the parish house of St. John's Church, Huntingdon, in Waverly, which will undergo its metamorphosis this week, when a select group of antique dealers set up shop for the show.The antiques, including period furniture, Oriental rugs and silver, will be arranged in roomlike settings which show their beauty to best advantage.The show (which its participants like to claim is "Baltimore's best small antiques show")
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