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NEWS
August 24, 2003
On August 21, 2003, JOHN E. DALLAM; beloved husband of the late Marjorie Dallam (nee Lehmann); dear uncle of Richard Dallam Munnikhuysen and Mary Louise Dallam Warren. Also survived by several great-nephews. A Funeral Service will be held Monday 12 noon, at St. John's Episcopal Church-Huntingdon, 3009 Greenmount Avenue. Interment private. Arrangements by the family owned Mitchell-Wiedefeld Funeral Home, Inc.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 25, 2010
Josephine Webster Dallam, a community volunteer who was named a Harford County Living Treasure, died in her sleep Feb. 14 at Broom's Bloom Farm, where she had lived all her life. She was 95. Born on that farm, she was a 1931 Bel Air High School graduate. Family members said she could recall the end of World War I in 1918 and Armistice bunting draped around the Bel Air courthouse's iron fence. Her home on the farm was called North Point, after the Battle of North Point in which her great-grandfather, John Adams Webster, played a role in defeating the British during the War of 1812.
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NEWS
March 18, 2005
On March 15, 2005, FREDERICK DUVALL DALLAM of Trappe, MD, beloved husband of Eleanor Dallam (nee Baker); devoted father of David Chandler Dallam of Washington, D.C., Elizabeth "Betsy" Dallam Paul and her husband Mitchell of Damascus, and John Duvall Dallam of Jersey City, NJ; he is also survived by a sister, Sally Dallam Mc Alpin of Princeton, NJ and a grandson, David Alexander Paul; he was predeceased by a sister, Elizabeth Dallam Robertson. A Memorial Service will be held at a later date.
NEWS
January 28, 2007
On Jan. 24, 1781, Quartermaster Richard Dallam of Abingdon wrote to Gov. Thomas Sim Lee concerning the passage of troops through Harford County during the War for Independence. "A detachment of 32 wagons with Captain Brown's artillery passed a few days ago and experienced much the want of provisions, and the inhabitants have also suffered thereby." Hungry troops forced local citizens to supply them in exchange for worthless certificates of reimbursement. Although Harford County was not invaded during the conflict, the constant military traffic was a source of anxiety.
NEWS
June 21, 1994
Ariel Hope Dallam, a home teacher in the Harford County school system for nearly 40 years, died Saturday of heart failure at her home, Mount Adams Farm near Bel Air. She was 63.She had also taught English at the Harford Day School in the early 1960s and again in the early 1970s.Mrs. Dallam, who was senior warden of St. George's Parish Old Spesutia Episcopal Church in Perryman, was a lay chaplain at Montebello State Hospital.Born in Monroe, Ohio, the former Ariel Hope Harlan was raised there and in Baltimore, where she attended the Bryn Mawr School.
NEWS
January 14, 2006
ALICE CECILDALLAM, age 87 of 1625 Conowingo Rd., Rising Sun, MD died on Thursday, January 12, 2006. Mrs. Dallam, daughter of Wiley M. and Annie Early Cecil, was born in Colora, MD on October 13, 1918. She was a 1936 graduate of Rising Sun High School and was a life long resident of Cecil County. Following the death of her husband Charles Lee Dallam in 1966, Mrs. Dallam served as Committing Magistrate for Cecil County from 1966 to 1971, and owned and operated The Conowingo Dairy bar at Conowingo until August 1985.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2005
Frederick Duvall Dallam, a business consultant who spent nearly a decade in Belgium with his family and retired on the Eastern Shore to delve into local history and boating, died Tuesday of liver cancer at his home in Trappe. He was 72. Born in Baltimore, Mr. Dallam grew up living in Washington and Sandy Spring, where he graduated from Sherwood High School. He went on to earn a bachelor's degree in English, and speech and drama at the University of Maryland, College Park After graduation from college in 1955, he served in the Navy for four years as an aircraft-carrier pilot, scouting submarines.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
Marjorie Lehmann Dallam, a noted concert singer and teacher who taught voice in Baltimore for more than 40 years, died Thursday from complications of a stroke at her Mount Vernon home in the Washington Apartments. She was 79.Mrs. Dallam, whose voice was described by a friend as a "full-bodied soprano," had appeared as a soloist with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Reginald Stewart, and the summer pops series of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra conducted by Robert P. Iula.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2003
One Friday morning, Kate Dallam leaves her dairy farm in Harford County for the hour-long drive to Israel Kinsinger's cheese plant in Pennsylvania to collect cheese he has made from the milk her cows produced. But she is not sure the Lancaster County farmer knows she is coming. Kinsinger, who is Amish, has a phone in the woods behind his house, but he may not have checked his messages. "Communication can be a challenge," says Dallam, who with her husband owns Broom's Bloom Dairy in Creswell.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 2004
For months, Mark Haley of Jarrettsville had been driving past the "coming soon" sign on Route 543 in Bel Air, waiting for the new ice cream shop to open. Finally, on Thursday, he was able to step inside the newly opened Broom's Bloom Creamery and order a waffle cone filled with rich pecan brittle ice cream. Haley, who declared the ice cream "as good as Ben and Jerry's" joined other customers, including Gloria Montague of Bel Air and Elmer Smith of Fallston, who were enjoying scoops during the shop's second day of business.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun Reporter | December 20, 2006
Kate Dallam, co-owner of the Broom's Bloom dairy farm and ice cream shop, was getting lunch with her daughter yesterday in Bel Air when a fellow patron asked her if she'd heard the news. "She told me, `Broom's Bloom is on fire, and the cows are still inside,'" Dallam recalled yesterday.
NEWS
January 14, 2006
ALICE CECILDALLAM, age 87 of 1625 Conowingo Rd., Rising Sun, MD died on Thursday, January 12, 2006. Mrs. Dallam, daughter of Wiley M. and Annie Early Cecil, was born in Colora, MD on October 13, 1918. She was a 1936 graduate of Rising Sun High School and was a life long resident of Cecil County. Following the death of her husband Charles Lee Dallam in 1966, Mrs. Dallam served as Committing Magistrate for Cecil County from 1966 to 1971, and owned and operated The Conowingo Dairy bar at Conowingo until August 1985.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2005
Frederick Duvall Dallam, a business consultant who spent nearly a decade in Belgium with his family and retired on the Eastern Shore to delve into local history and boating, died Tuesday of liver cancer at his home in Trappe. He was 72. Born in Baltimore, Mr. Dallam grew up living in Washington and Sandy Spring, where he graduated from Sherwood High School. He went on to earn a bachelor's degree in English, and speech and drama at the University of Maryland, College Park After graduation from college in 1955, he served in the Navy for four years as an aircraft-carrier pilot, scouting submarines.
NEWS
March 18, 2005
On March 15, 2005, FREDERICK DUVALL DALLAM of Trappe, MD, beloved husband of Eleanor Dallam (nee Baker); devoted father of David Chandler Dallam of Washington, D.C., Elizabeth "Betsy" Dallam Paul and her husband Mitchell of Damascus, and John Duvall Dallam of Jersey City, NJ; he is also survived by a sister, Sally Dallam Mc Alpin of Princeton, NJ and a grandson, David Alexander Paul; he was predeceased by a sister, Elizabeth Dallam Robertson. A Memorial Service will be held at a later date.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 2004
For months, Mark Haley of Jarrettsville had been driving past the "coming soon" sign on Route 543 in Bel Air, waiting for the new ice cream shop to open. Finally, on Thursday, he was able to step inside the newly opened Broom's Bloom Creamery and order a waffle cone filled with rich pecan brittle ice cream. Haley, who declared the ice cream "as good as Ben and Jerry's" joined other customers, including Gloria Montague of Bel Air and Elmer Smith of Fallston, who were enjoying scoops during the shop's second day of business.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 2004
For months, Mark Haley of Jarrettsville had been driving past the "coming soon" sign on Route 543 in Bel Air, waiting for the new ice cream shop to open. Finally, on Thursday, he was able to step inside the newly opened Broom's Bloom Creamery and order a waffle cone filled with rich pecan brittle ice cream. Haley, who declared the ice cream "as good as Ben and Jerry's" joined other customers, including Gloria Montague of Bel Air and Elmer Smith of Fallston, who were enjoying scoops during the shop's second day of business.
NEWS
January 28, 2007
On Jan. 24, 1781, Quartermaster Richard Dallam of Abingdon wrote to Gov. Thomas Sim Lee concerning the passage of troops through Harford County during the War for Independence. "A detachment of 32 wagons with Captain Brown's artillery passed a few days ago and experienced much the want of provisions, and the inhabitants have also suffered thereby." Hungry troops forced local citizens to supply them in exchange for worthless certificates of reimbursement. Although Harford County was not invaded during the conflict, the constant military traffic was a source of anxiety.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun Reporter | December 20, 2006
Kate Dallam, co-owner of the Broom's Bloom dairy farm and ice cream shop, was getting lunch with her daughter yesterday in Bel Air when a fellow patron asked her if she'd heard the news. "She told me, `Broom's Bloom is on fire, and the cows are still inside,'" Dallam recalled yesterday.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2004
As their numbers dwindle, Harford County dairy farmers are turning to related lines of business, including the production and sale of ice cream, to enhance their chances of survival. According to C. John Sullivan, agricultural coordinator with the county's Office of Economic Development, four of the 30 remaining dairy farms in the county have moved into the production of ice cream or are in the process of moving into the business. In most cases, the farmers are assisted in their new venture by a one-of-a-kind county agricultural grant program that takes some of the financial risk out of their expansions.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2004
As their numbers dwindle, Harford County dairy farmers are turning to related lines of business, including the production and sale of ice cream, to enhance their chances of survival. According to C. John Sullivan, agricultural coordinator with the county's Office of Economic Development, four of the 30 remaining dairy farms in the county have moved into the production of ice cream or are in the process of moving into the business. In most cases, the farmers are assisted in their new venture by a one-of-a-kind county agricultural grant program that takes some of the financial risk out of their expansions.
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