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By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
The Dalai Lama, the spiritual leader for Tibetan Buddhists, will speak in May at the University of Maryland as part of the Sadat Lecture for Peace, an annual series that has drawn world leaders such as Madeleine Albright, Nelson Mandela and Jimmy Carter. The event will be held at 10 a.m. May 7 at the Comcast Center on the College Park campus. Tickets are free but required. "It is very important that we expose our students to the broadest cultural and international diversity possible, and help them become global citizens," University of Maryland President Wallace Loh said in a statement.
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NEWS
May 10, 2013
Just so your readers know, His Holiness the Dalai Lama was having fun with his fellow dignitaries at the end of his lecture Tuesday at the University of Maryland ("At UM, a face-to-face with the Dalai Lama," May 8). He demonstrated various forms of taking leave of another person - shaking a hand, giving a hug, a kiss on a cheek or touching foreheads (a traditional Tibetan form). He also demonstrated rubbing noses with Gov. Martin O'Malley, a form the Tibetan spiritual leader attributed to the Maori.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
He pulled on a Terps visor, to the crowd's delight. He rubbed noses with Gov. Martin O'Malley. And the Dalai Lama was met Tuesday with rounds of applause from a crowd of 15,000 at the University of Maryland, College Park's Comcast Center. "Sit down," the 78-year-old Tibetan spiritual leader said in a firm but friendly voice when he approached the podium and the crowd rose to its feet. "No formality! We are [the] same. … The way we are born, the way we die: no formality. " Clad in red robes and his trademark spectacles, the Dalai Lama appeared at the university to give an address on peace, compassion and fellowship as part of the Anwar Sadat Lecture Series.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
He pulled on a Terps visor, to the crowd's delight. He rubbed noses with Gov. Martin O'Malley. And the Dalai Lama was met Tuesday with rounds of applause from a crowd of 15,000 at the University of Maryland, College Park's Comcast Center. "Sit down," the 78-year-old Tibetan spiritual leader said in a firm but friendly voice when he approached the podium and the crowd rose to its feet. "No formality! We are [the] same. … The way we are born, the way we die: no formality. " Clad in red robes and his trademark spectacles, the Dalai Lama appeared at the university to give an address on peace, compassion and fellowship as part of the Anwar Sadat Lecture Series.
NEWS
By Henry Chu and Henry Chu,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 1, 1999
XIGAZE, Tibet -- Both boys are too young to shave or even to count their age beyond the fingers of two hands. Both live in the Chinese capital surrounded by police who supervise their every move. But only one is His Holiness the 11th Panchen Lama, the second most revered figure in Tibetan Buddhism, who by tradition reigns in this gritty but sacred city in the highlands of south-central Tibet. The officially approved 11th Panchen Lama is 9-year-old Erdeni Chosgyi Gyalpo, a descendant of nomadic Tibetan herders who has spent the past four years in Beijing studying classic Buddhist texts and scriptures.
FEATURES
By Galen Rowell and Galen Rowell,Universal Press Syndicate | December 16, 1990
The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided to award the 1989 Nobel Peace Prize to the 14th Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso, the religious and political leader of the Tibetan people. . . . The Dalai Lama has developed his philosophy of peace from a great reverence for all things living and upon the concept of universal responsibility embracing all mankind as well as nature. In the opinion of the Committee the Dalai Lama has come forward with constructive and forward-looking proposals for the solution of international conflicts, human rights issues and global environmental problems.
NEWS
By Mike McGrew | October 3, 2011
This summer, the Dalai Lama, spiritual leader of Tibetan Buddhists, preached on the U.S. Capitol grounds to promote his 2011 world peace initiative and related quest to reconcile the world's great religions. I've always been fascinated by his very simple but often profound writings. The Dalai Lama views his worship space to be "his brain and his heart" and his philosophy to be "kindness. " From all I've read about him, he's a great example of one who "walks his talk. " Recently, I've been contemplating the kindnesses, brains and hearts of personal acquaintances representing three other great religions.
NEWS
October 15, 1990
It's hard to imagine two more different men or two more different approaches to peace than the Dalai Lama, the spiritual leader of Tibet who won last year's Nobel Peace Prize, and this year's winner, Mikhail Gorbachev. Yet peace is a tantalizingly elusive goal, one that will only be reached imperfectly -- and only when all kinds of people, from spiritual leaders to heads of state to ordinary men and women, use their imagination, vision and power in ways that lessen the tensions that breed hatred and violence.
NEWS
By Stephanie A. Flores-Koulish | October 20, 2009
I felt surprised when I found out that I would be seeing the Dalai Lama at an education summit in Washington, D.C. I also felt a sense of responsibility after leaving Constitution Hall that afternoon earlier this month. The responsibility, in my case, was about ensuring that the content of this conference enters the public dialogue. Marion Wright Edelman said it best that day by stating that democracy is not a spectator sport. And so my democratic responsibility, in Obama's America, is to trumpet that we must ensure that our public schools educate children for healthy minds and hearts.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | December 9, 2009
I was not ready to see Bruce Springsteen bemedalled at the Kennedy Center Honors last week, and I still am not ready. It was less than a year ago the Boss did that fantastic slide across the stage on his knees at the Super Bowl halftime show, thrusting his crotch at 90 million Americans on live TV, and here he was, listening to various nobodies tell him how great he is, with a medal around his neck, and his neck looked a little jowly. The Kennedy Honors is for the Extinguished: It's America's way of saying, "Sit down and take a load off, time's up, old-timer."
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
The Dalai Lama, the spiritual leader for Tibetan Buddhists, will speak in May at the University of Maryland as part of the Sadat Lecture for Peace, an annual series that has drawn world leaders such as Madeleine Albright, Nelson Mandela and Jimmy Carter. The event will be held at 10 a.m. May 7 at the Comcast Center on the College Park campus. Tickets are free but required. "It is very important that we expose our students to the broadest cultural and international diversity possible, and help them become global citizens," University of Maryland President Wallace Loh said in a statement.
NEWS
By Mike McGrew | October 3, 2011
This summer, the Dalai Lama, spiritual leader of Tibetan Buddhists, preached on the U.S. Capitol grounds to promote his 2011 world peace initiative and related quest to reconcile the world's great religions. I've always been fascinated by his very simple but often profound writings. The Dalai Lama views his worship space to be "his brain and his heart" and his philosophy to be "kindness. " From all I've read about him, he's a great example of one who "walks his talk. " Recently, I've been contemplating the kindnesses, brains and hearts of personal acquaintances representing three other great religions.
NEWS
February 4, 2010
- China again urged President Barack Obama on Wednesday not to hold a planned meeting with Dalai Lama, saying it would further hurt already strained bilateral relations. It was the second successive day that China has spoken out against the meeting, and comes after Beijing said ties had been harmed by a U.S. announcement last week that it would sell arms to Taiwan. The United States has already brushed aside previous warnings from China, and White House spokesman Bill Burton said Tuesday the meeting was still planned, although no date has been set. "The president told ... China's leaders during his trip last year that he would meet with the Dalai Lama, and he intends to do so. The Dalai Lama is an internationally respected religious and cultural leader, and the president will meet with him in that capacity," Burton said.
NEWS
February 2, 2010
BEIJING - China warned President Barack Obama today not to meet the Dalai Lama, saying any such meeting would harm bilateral relations. An Obama meeting with the Dalai Lama would "seriously undermine the political foundation of Sino-U.S. relations," said Zhu Weiqun, executive deputy head of the Communist Party's United Front Work Department. The warning to Obama comes after recent signals from U.S. officials that Obama might soon meet the exiled Tibetan leader - something Chinese officials are keen to avoid before President Hu Jintao travels to Washington, possibly in April.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | December 9, 2009
I was not ready to see Bruce Springsteen bemedalled at the Kennedy Center Honors last week, and I still am not ready. It was less than a year ago the Boss did that fantastic slide across the stage on his knees at the Super Bowl halftime show, thrusting his crotch at 90 million Americans on live TV, and here he was, listening to various nobodies tell him how great he is, with a medal around his neck, and his neck looked a little jowly. The Kennedy Honors is for the Extinguished: It's America's way of saying, "Sit down and take a load off, time's up, old-timer."
NEWS
By Stephanie A. Flores-Koulish | October 20, 2009
I felt surprised when I found out that I would be seeing the Dalai Lama at an education summit in Washington, D.C. I also felt a sense of responsibility after leaving Constitution Hall that afternoon earlier this month. The responsibility, in my case, was about ensuring that the content of this conference enters the public dialogue. Marion Wright Edelman said it best that day by stating that democracy is not a spectator sport. And so my democratic responsibility, in Obama's America, is to trumpet that we must ensure that our public schools educate children for healthy minds and hearts.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | March 22, 1994
JERUSALEM -- In a land burning with hatreds, a statesman came here this week claiming to have found a "spirit of reconciliation in the region."To a people at war since the birth of their state, he spoke of pacifism and nonviolence. He said he found humanity in those who committed modern history's worst atrocity, though many in his audience were victims of the crime.He talked of "mutual respect" in a place where everyday people demonize their enemy.Snubbed by government officials, but mobbed by the people: Who is this red-robed man?
NEWS
By Elliot Sperling | April 7, 2008
The Dalai Lama's rationale for keeping Tibet in China has always had a certain logic to it: China is a great country, and Tibet would benefit by being part of it. Alas, most of the benefit to being a part of China on display in recent weeks has not been very tempting. The fact is, despite displays of clear Tibetan nationalism and calls for independence coming from Tibet, the Dalai Lama has long since made up his mind about Tibet's future and will not be moved. And China has long since made up its mind about the Dalai Lama and - more seriously - has made very astute use of him. Since the early 1970s, the Dalai Lama has had no desire to see Tibet independent, though he did not publicly acknowledge this changed position until 1988, when he offered a proposal for partial autonomy.
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