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Dakota Fanning

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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 21, 2005
Aworking actress since age 6, she's appeared alongside Sean Penn, Robert De Niro, Denzel Washington, Tom Cruise and, most recently, Kurt Russell. In fact, she's appearing in four movies this year alone and is the subject of serious Oscar talk for her role in War of the Worlds. She travels the world, gets glammed-up for high-profile movie premieres, is the subject of flattering profiles in newspapers and magazines. Not a bad life for an 11-year-old. Yet Dakota Fanning insists it's not a big deal.
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July 7, 2009
DVD Push ** (2 stars) Starring Chris Evans, Dakota Fanning. Directed by Paul McGuigan. Released by Summit Entertainment. $26.95 (Blu-ray $34.95). Set "two days from now," in a Hong Kong where you can't walk 10 yards without encountering someone with mutant powers (including a posse of Asians whose power consists of making bug eyes and bursting glass fish-tanks with their high-decibel shrieks), Push watches as a bunch of second-generation mutants have-at each other, with the future of all Mutantdom as the prize!
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By Ron Dickers and Ron Dickers,Hartford Courant | December 15, 2006
In Charlotte's Web, opening today, Dakota Fanning's farm girl grabs an ax from her father as he is about to slaughter a runt piglet. "I will not let you kill him," her Fern declares. Dakota's first take of the scene wowed director Gary Winick, who told his charge it was better than Meryl Streep. But this was a children's movie. He asked her to do it again. "The next take, she was a 10," Winick recalls. "She totally simplified it and got it to be innocent and instinctual." That is Dakota, the technician and the natural.
NEWS
By Glenn Whipp and Glenn Whipp,Los Angeles Times | February 6, 2009
The painfully inscrutable paranormal thriller Push introduces us to a host of characters with various gifts - some can see the future, some can heal, some can plant ideas, some can make change for a dollar. By the time the credits roll, your most fervent wish is to run into a "wiper" (one who can erase memories) after stumbling into the lobby. That, or a telepath who could convince you that you just watched Slumdog Millionaire instead. We are told in a windy, opening-credits prologue that psychic experiments started by Nazis are now being continued by the U.S. government to create some kind of super army.
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By ROGER MOORE and ROGER MOORE,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 14, 2006
How much of a story can you tell in 12 to 15 minutes? How much can we learn about people, their history, the traps that their lives have become, in a tale that briefly told? A lot, it turns out. Writer-director Rodrigo Garcia, who specializes in short-sketch ensemble films assembled around a theme - Things You Can Tell Just By Looking at Her was his - has rounded up an A-list of actresses (and some pretty good actors, too) for nine short, loosely interconnected stories of loneliness and the relationships that the women cannot seem to escape.
NEWS
January 30, 2009
Coraline : (Focus Features) The makers of A Nightmare Before Christmas tell an animated story of a young girl who walks through a secret door in her new home and discovers an alternate version of her life. With the voices of Dakota Fanning and Teri Hatcher. He's Just Not That Into You: (New Line Cinema) The lives of desperate Baltimore singles intersect in a loose adaptation of the popular self-help book. With Jennifer Aniston and Drew Barrymore. The Pink Panther Deux : (Columbia Pictures)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 15, 2006
There's a golden minute that epitomizes everything that's gone wonderfully right with the new live-action movie version of E.B. White's 1952 novel, Charlotte's Web. "Go to sleep my little one," the girl Fern croons to her beloved runt pig, Wilbur, with words as plain and full of feeling as if she'd just thought them up and had to sing them out. "The sun has said goodbye for now. The moon shines on your beautiful face. ... " And then, in mid-stanza, as quickly as Fern pipes it up, the lullaby fades, the emotion of its melody and verse perfected by the tingling purity of Dakota Fanning's performance as Fern and the homey nocturnal light that blankets the girl and Wilbur.
NEWS
By Glenn Whipp and Glenn Whipp,Los Angeles Times | February 6, 2009
The painfully inscrutable paranormal thriller Push introduces us to a host of characters with various gifts - some can see the future, some can heal, some can plant ideas, some can make change for a dollar. By the time the credits roll, your most fervent wish is to run into a "wiper" (one who can erase memories) after stumbling into the lobby. That, or a telepath who could convince you that you just watched Slumdog Millionaire instead. We are told in a windy, opening-credits prologue that psychic experiments started by Nazis are now being continued by the U.S. government to create some kind of super army.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | January 28, 2005
I won't say which Stephen King novel and movie Hide and Seek rips off - that would give too much away. And really, the scares are already rare enough in this ho-hum, little-girl-and-her-ghost thriller. No sense ruining any of them with a silly old movie review. Robert De Niro plays a New York psychologist whose daughter (Dakota Fanning) turns into a Wednesday Addams clone when they find mommy's body in a tub of blood. He then decides they should move to the country. There, Emily meets Charlie, an imaginary friend who likes to play her favorite game, hide and seek.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 15, 2003
Uptown Girls desperately - a little too desperately - tries to wring laughs from the plight of two emotionally stilted young women. Twentysomething Molly Gunn (Brittany Murphy) is a strange breed of debutante: Her father was a legendary rock singer who died while on tour, and the trust fund he left behind has been enough to allow his daughter to live comfortably as the toast of New York's high-society party scene. Irrepressibly irresponsible, Molly specializes in making a mess of her life, then waiting for someone else to come and clean things up. A crooked accountant and a suddenly depleted trust fund, however, conspire to force Molly into the real world.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | February 3, 2009
Starring Dakota Fanning, Queen Latifah, Jennifer Hudson. Written and directed by Gina Prince-Blythewood. Released by 20th Century Fox. $29.99 (Blu-ray $39.95) *** 1/2 Sue Monk Kidd's novel The Secret Life of Bees, the story of a runaway young white girl in the '60s-era South who finds a loving surrogate family in the guise of three black sisters raising honey, has become a much-loved staple of high-school reading lists. Writer-director Gina Prince-Blythewood's film adaptation should disappoint none of the book's fans.
NEWS
January 30, 2009
Coraline : (Focus Features) The makers of A Nightmare Before Christmas tell an animated story of a young girl who walks through a secret door in her new home and discovers an alternate version of her life. With the voices of Dakota Fanning and Teri Hatcher. He's Just Not That Into You: (New Line Cinema) The lives of desperate Baltimore singles intersect in a loose adaptation of the popular self-help book. With Jennifer Aniston and Drew Barrymore. The Pink Panther Deux : (Columbia Pictures)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach and Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun movie Critics | February 2, 2007
Capsules by film critics Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach unless noted. Full reviews are at baltimoresun.com/movies. Alpha Dog -- centers on a passel of drugged-out teen reprobates for whom every word is a four-letter one beginning with F, every action is a reaction to some perceived slight and every waking moment is an opportunity to be squandered. Writer-director Nick Cassavetes clearly sees his film as a cautionary tale. But the deck is too stacked. (C.K.) R 117 minutes B- Arthur and the Invisibles -- tries way too hard.
FEATURES
By Ron Dickers and Ron Dickers,Hartford Courant | December 15, 2006
In Charlotte's Web, opening today, Dakota Fanning's farm girl grabs an ax from her father as he is about to slaughter a runt piglet. "I will not let you kill him," her Fern declares. Dakota's first take of the scene wowed director Gary Winick, who told his charge it was better than Meryl Streep. But this was a children's movie. He asked her to do it again. "The next take, she was a 10," Winick recalls. "She totally simplified it and got it to be innocent and instinctual." That is Dakota, the technician and the natural.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 15, 2006
There's a golden minute that epitomizes everything that's gone wonderfully right with the new live-action movie version of E.B. White's 1952 novel, Charlotte's Web. "Go to sleep my little one," the girl Fern croons to her beloved runt pig, Wilbur, with words as plain and full of feeling as if she'd just thought them up and had to sing them out. "The sun has said goodbye for now. The moon shines on your beautiful face. ... " And then, in mid-stanza, as quickly as Fern pipes it up, the lullaby fades, the emotion of its melody and verse perfected by the tingling purity of Dakota Fanning's performance as Fern and the homey nocturnal light that blankets the girl and Wilbur.
FEATURES
By ROGER MOORE and ROGER MOORE,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 14, 2006
How much of a story can you tell in 12 to 15 minutes? How much can we learn about people, their history, the traps that their lives have become, in a tale that briefly told? A lot, it turns out. Writer-director Rodrigo Garcia, who specializes in short-sketch ensemble films assembled around a theme - Things You Can Tell Just By Looking at Her was his - has rounded up an A-list of actresses (and some pretty good actors, too) for nine short, loosely interconnected stories of loneliness and the relationships that the women cannot seem to escape.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | February 3, 2009
Starring Dakota Fanning, Queen Latifah, Jennifer Hudson. Written and directed by Gina Prince-Blythewood. Released by 20th Century Fox. $29.99 (Blu-ray $39.95) *** 1/2 Sue Monk Kidd's novel The Secret Life of Bees, the story of a runaway young white girl in the '60s-era South who finds a loving surrogate family in the guise of three black sisters raising honey, has become a much-loved staple of high-school reading lists. Writer-director Gina Prince-Blythewood's film adaptation should disappoint none of the book's fans.
FEATURES
July 7, 2009
DVD Push ** (2 stars) Starring Chris Evans, Dakota Fanning. Directed by Paul McGuigan. Released by Summit Entertainment. $26.95 (Blu-ray $34.95). Set "two days from now," in a Hong Kong where you can't walk 10 yards without encountering someone with mutant powers (including a posse of Asians whose power consists of making bug eyes and bursting glass fish-tanks with their high-decibel shrieks), Push watches as a bunch of second-generation mutants have-at each other, with the future of all Mutantdom as the prize!
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