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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2001
WASHINGTON - Legislation was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives yesterday that would make Maryland and at least 24 other states part of regional dairy compacts that would set the minimum price farmers are paid for their milk. During a ceremony held on the lawn of the Capitol, a steady stream of lawmakers came to the podium to say the legislation is needed to provide farmers a fair price for their milk and to guarantee consumers a supply of local fresh milk. Low milk prices at the farm have been blamed for the steady decline in dairy farms across the country.
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NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2008
There will be a corn crop next year and farmers will continue plowing their fields, milking their cows, feeding their chickens and selling their goods at market. But I won't be around to report on it. The newspaper is ending this weekly farm column. As I look back over a long career, I think about the respect I developed for farmers. They work hard and work smart or they don't survive. They are part of the largest industry in the state. They feed us at a fraction of the cost of food in other nations while constantly battling the uncontrollable threats of Mother Nature.
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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1998
State agriculture officials said yesterday that New York's failure to pass dairy compact legislation does not necessarily exclude Maryland from membership in the Northeast Interstate Dairy Compact.When the General Assembly approved a bill clearing the way for Maryland's entry into the regional milk pricing consortium in April, it was thought that the compact would be limited to contiguous states.The compact is designed to halt the sharp decline in Maryland's dairy industry. The state has lost 25 percent of its dairy farms since 1991 and 40 percent over the past 12 years.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2001
WASHINGTON - Legislation was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives yesterday that would make Maryland and at least 24 other states part of regional dairy compacts that would set the minimum price farmers are paid for their milk. During a ceremony held on the lawn of the Capitol, a steady stream of lawmakers came to the podium to say the legislation is needed to provide farmers a fair price for their milk and to guarantee consumers a supply of local fresh milk. Low milk prices at the farm have been blamed for the steady decline in dairy farms across the country.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1998
As the result of a committee vote in Annapolis, Maryland could become the odd man out when it comes to dairy compact legislation, and industry officials say farmers and consumers would pay the price.At least 21 Eastern Seaboard and Gulf Coast states, from Maine to Oklahoma, have either enacted dairy compact legislation or have bills pending. Delaware expects to introduce a milk compact bill in coming weeks."The way that things are going, Maryland stands to be an island by itself," said Thomas Irvin, Georgia's commissioner of agriculture.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1999
Maryland's entry into the Northeast Dairy Compact was assured yesterday -- assuming Congress goes along -- as Delaware Gov. Thomas R. Carper signed legislation for Delaware to join the compact.But in order for the compact to become a reality, Congress must approve legislation reauthorizing the milk price-support plan that is designed to ease the financial plight of dairy farmers.Under the proposed federal legislation, only contiguous states would be allowed to participate in a compact. Maryland was waiting for either Pennsylvania or Delaware to approve participation in the Northeast compact.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer JoAnna Daemmrich contributed to this article | March 31, 1998
A proposal to allow Maryland to join a regional milk pricing consortium cleared a key hurdle in the House of Delegates yesterday.House members rejected two attempts to set limits on the state's proposed entrance in the Northeast Interstate Dairy Compact, a consortium of six New England states that sets the farm price of Class 1 (drinking) milk.Del. James F. Ports, a Baltimore County Republican, proposed amending the bill to exempt low-income families who receive food stamps. And Del. Tony E. Fulton, a Baltimore Democrat, wanted to withdraw hospitals, nursing homes and other assisted living programs from participating.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1998
A Senate committee's vote to kill proposed legislation that would have allowed Maryland to be part of a dairy compact had state agriculture officials reeling yesterday and wondering what can be done to protect the struggling industry."
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1998
The price that Baltimore's poor will pay for milk was at the heart of a lively state Senate hearing yesterday on a bill that would allow Maryland to become a member of the Northeast Interstate Dairy Compact.Opponents of the legislation, which would allow the compact to set the farm price of Class 1 (drinking) milk in Maryland, argued that it would boost the price to those least able to afford it.Supporters pointed out that Baltimore residents already pay considerably more for milk than consumers in other parts of the ** state.
BUSINESS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1998
A key Maryland Senate committee approved a bill yesterday that would allow the state to join a regional milk-pricing group, setting the stage for a final decision on the issue as early as tomorrow.After a week of heavy lobbying from both sides, the Senate Economic and Environmental Affairs Committee voted 7-4 to allow Maryland to join the Northeast Interstate Dairy Compact, a consortium of six New England states that sets the farm price of Class 1 (drinking) milk.The action sends the legislation to the full Senate, where a floor fight is expected amid growing pressure from lobbyists for grocery retailers, who oppose the bill, and dairy farmers, who want it.Sen.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1999
The U.S. Senate failed yesterday to extend the life of New England's price-setting dairy compact, dealing a blow to Maryland's plans to join a system that sets milk prices paid to farmers.Supporters of the New England alliance fell seven votes short of the 60 necessary to overcome a filibuster that blocked a one year extension of the compact, which is set to expire in October."It's unfortunate that they didn't succeed on that," said Patrick McMillan, assistant to Maryland Agriculture Secretary Henry A. Virts.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1999
Maryland's entry into the Northeast Dairy Compact was assured yesterday -- assuming Congress goes along -- as Delaware Gov. Thomas R. Carper signed legislation for Delaware to join the compact.But in order for the compact to become a reality, Congress must approve legislation reauthorizing the milk price-support plan that is designed to ease the financial plight of dairy farmers.Under the proposed federal legislation, only contiguous states would be allowed to participate in a compact. Maryland was waiting for either Pennsylvania or Delaware to approve participation in the Northeast compact.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1998
A new federal government report confirms something that Harold Lenhart has known for years: There is very little correlation between the price dairy farmers get for their milk and what consumers pay for the product at the supermarket."
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1998
State agriculture officials said yesterday that New York's failure to pass dairy compact legislation does not necessarily exclude Maryland from membership in the Northeast Interstate Dairy Compact.When the General Assembly approved a bill clearing the way for Maryland's entry into the regional milk pricing consortium in April, it was thought that the compact would be limited to contiguous states.The compact is designed to halt the sharp decline in Maryland's dairy industry. The state has lost 25 percent of its dairy farms since 1991 and 40 percent over the past 12 years.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | April 19, 1998
Not since Mrs. O'Leary's cow was accused of kicking over the lantern that started the Great Chicago Fire has milk been the center of such a controversy.It stems from the General Assembly's recent passage of legislation that opens the door for Maryland to become part of a multistate dairy compact that will set the farm price of milk.The legislation is designed to halt the sharp decline in the number of Maryland dairy farms in recent years by stabilizing the fluctuating prices farmers get for milk.
NEWS
April 9, 1998
Dairy compact bill would help farmers keep pace in industryI am a dairy farmer, and I am angry at Giant Foods' attempt to kill dairy compact legislation in Maryland. I also believe that your paper's editorial staff has succumbed to the influence of Giant's advertising dollars. The average annual pay price I receive for fluid milk has not increased since 1981. The average retail price in Baltimore has increased by 81 cents a gallon since 1981.Do you think Giant officials and employees get the same income as in 1981?
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1999
The U.S. Senate failed yesterday to extend the life of New England's price-setting dairy compact, dealing a blow to Maryland's plans to join a system that sets milk prices paid to farmers.Supporters of the New England alliance fell seven votes short of the 60 necessary to overcome a filibuster that blocked a one year extension of the compact, which is set to expire in October."It's unfortunate that they didn't succeed on that," said Patrick McMillan, assistant to Maryland Agriculture Secretary Henry A. Virts.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2008
There will be a corn crop next year and farmers will continue plowing their fields, milking their cows, feeding their chickens and selling their goods at market. But I won't be around to report on it. The newspaper is ending this weekly farm column. As I look back over a long career, I think about the respect I developed for farmers. They work hard and work smart or they don't survive. They are part of the largest industry in the state. They feed us at a fraction of the cost of food in other nations while constantly battling the uncontrollable threats of Mother Nature.
BUSINESS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1998
A key Maryland Senate committee approved a bill yesterday that would allow the state to join a regional milk-pricing group, setting the stage for a final decision on the issue as early as tomorrow.After a week of heavy lobbying from both sides, the Senate Economic and Environmental Affairs Committee voted 7-4 to allow Maryland to join the Northeast Interstate Dairy Compact, a consortium of six New England states that sets the farm price of Class 1 (drinking) milk.The action sends the legislation to the full Senate, where a floor fight is expected amid growing pressure from lobbyists for grocery retailers, who oppose the bill, and dairy farmers, who want it.Sen.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer JoAnna Daemmrich contributed to this article | March 31, 1998
A proposal to allow Maryland to join a regional milk pricing consortium cleared a key hurdle in the House of Delegates yesterday.House members rejected two attempts to set limits on the state's proposed entrance in the Northeast Interstate Dairy Compact, a consortium of six New England states that sets the farm price of Class 1 (drinking) milk.Del. James F. Ports, a Baltimore County Republican, proposed amending the bill to exempt low-income families who receive food stamps. And Del. Tony E. Fulton, a Baltimore Democrat, wanted to withdraw hospitals, nursing homes and other assisted living programs from participating.
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