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By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2010
Just as the Sunday morning Baltimore Farmers' Market underneath the Jones Falls Expressway was winding down, Arthur G. Morgan was gearing up for action. At noon Morgan hustled around the market picking up blue plastic bins filled with donated produce. Exchanging pleasantries with the merchants, he collected mounds of carrots, baskets of cucumbers, mountains of greens, a bin of apples, some herbs and several boxes of ripe Eastern Shore tomatoes. He piled the goods into the back of his aged Silverado and drove a few blocks up the Fallsway to Our Daily Bread.
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NEWS
December 24, 2013
It isn't every day you get to see someone remembered in an obituary as a bartender and a saint, but for George Thompson the words apply. The Sun's obituary left out the "saint" part, but I can assure your readers that the description is entirely appropriate ("George F. Thompson," Dec. 20). For almost 30 years George served as a volunteer at Our Daily Bread. Taking the bus, usually two or three times a week, he brought a deep sense of doing for others as he chopped the salad, mixed the vegetables or did whatever else needed to be done.
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NEWS
September 20, 1990
When Catholic Charities of Baltimore opened a soup kitchen called Our Daily Bread on West Franklin Street in 1981, the plan envisioned feeding about 125 of the city's neediest people each day. Today that number has grown to an average of 650 people a day -- a jump that reflects the worsening plight of the urban poor and the yawning chasm between affluence and misery opened during the go-go decade of the 1980s.As one of the most effective, private charitable agencies in the city, Our Daily Bread has served literally hundreds of thousands of meals over the past 10 years.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
George Frank Thompson, who made and served lunch to Pope John Paul II on his visit to Baltimore and who had earlier mixed drinks for five presidents as a Capitol Hill barman, died Dec. 14 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 98 and lived in the Otterbein section of the Inner Harbor. Family members said that he was hurt in a fall on a transit bus two months ago and died of complications from that injury. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Edward and Emma Milburn Thompson.
NEWS
July 1, 1991
The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimor has made a $35,000 donation to Our Daily Bread, a soup kitchen for the homeless operated by Associated Catholic Charities.The grant includes contributions from the Children of Harvey and Lyn Meyerhoff Philanthropic Fund and the Myerberg Philanthropic Fund."The Baltimore Jewish community is extremely concerned about the plight of the homeless and hungry," said Associated board chairman Suzanne F. Cohen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ruth Hakulin | January 17, 1999
They came in tuxes, velvet, sequins and satin to help raise money for Our Daily Bread, the soup kitchen on Cathedral Street that provides daily hot meals and other services to Baltimore's needy. The kitchen's seventh annual black-tie benefit dinner, chaired by Frank Gabor, attracted a sold-out crowd of 150. Those attending the event enjoyed music, a meal prepared by Baltimore chefs Nancy Longo and Michael Gettier, and a silent auction. Faces in the crowd included Walter Pinkerd, Stephen Fruin and party committee members Mary Ellen Kaplan, Barbara Brandjes and Nancy Footner "Some of the [clients]
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 3, 1999
I DON'T understand the bellyaching about the way things turned out with Our Daily Bread. Sure, the downtown business crowd overstated things by attributing an array of problems -- aggressive panhandling, shoplifting, car break-ins, empty retail space on Charles Street -- to the hundreds of men who congregate at ODB each day. And sure, the symbolism was vulgar -- wealthy white men (Peter Angelos, Jimmy Rouse, retired T. Rowe Price CEO George Collins)...
NEWS
By LARRY WILLIAMS | January 8, 2006
For years, Our Daily Bread soup kitchen has performed its good works on Cathedral Street, just across from the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Mount Vernon. In 2004, the kitchen, operated by Catholic Charities, served nearly a quarter of a million meals to the homeless and others who could not afford to buy their own. But the presence of the kitchen and its customers drew protests from local business owners and patrons of the Pratt. City officials and others looked for an alternative site and offered help for the kitchen to relocate.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2011
Jane P. Baker, a homemaker and Our Daily Bread volunteer, died of a heart attack Aug. 24 at the Edenwald retirement community. She was 90 and had lived in Guilford and the Orchards for many years. Born Jane Burton Parr in Portsmouth, Va., she moved to Baltimore as a child and lived in Mount Washington. She was a Cathedral School graduate and met her future husband, attorney George W. Baker, at the Catholic Action Guild, a volunteer club that met at the school. Mrs. Baker was a 1939 Western High School graduate.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | May 30, 2012
It was while she was serving dinner to her kids in 2008 and their dad was out campaigning for president, that Michelle Obama hatched a modest daydream: a vegetable garden on the White House grounds. She'd recently had a conversation with her children's pediatrician about their eating habits, and the poor health of children he was seeing in his practice. It shook her up — he was treating obesity and diabetes in kids — and she resolved to make better food choices for her family. She never said anything to Barack Obama about a vegetable garden (she told interviewers this week that she didn't want to jinx things with a "what if" question)
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 7, 2012
Unless you want a fight to break out at a cocktail party or a family reunion, conventional wisdom has it, don't talk religion or politics. I did both in this space last Monday, and then I crawled in a bunker and waited for the fireworks to begin. "Be prepared," my editor warned. "The long knives will come out. " "There's going to be a cross burning in your front yard," a friend warned; another asked if I had hired bodyguards. In that column, I talked of how difficult it was to be a Catholic woman these days, what with the church fathers taking up the cudgel against American nuns, not to mention the odd teacher struggling to get pregnant or the heartbroken teenage girl dumped by a guy on the eve of her prom.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
Thomas Joseph Lopresti, a longtime Towson barber and volunteer at Our Daily Bread, died April 12 of leukemia at Mercy Medical Center. The Timonium resident was 72. He was raised in East Baltimore, the son of Italian immigrants Carmello and Innocenta Lopresti. He attended Baltimore City College, and took a few courses in barbering but basically learned the trade from his father, who owned a shop in Greektown. Except for a stint in the Coast Guard, he worked as a barber nearly all of his life.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2012
Deverick Howell could only stare at the television as Ravens kicker Billy Cundiff's last-chance field goal attempt hooked left of the uprights, dealing the team and its fans a heartbreaking 23-20 loss Sunday to the New England Patriots. "I feel angry and disappointed," said Howell, who had worn his purple sneakers and loudly cheered the team on with fellow residents of Christopher Place, a residence for 60 formerly homeless men at the Our Daily Bread Employment Center on Fallsway. Howell probably spoke for fans across the region who were itching for the team to return to the Super Bowl for the first time in 11 years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
Agnes E. May, a homemaker and volunteer, died Saturday of congestive heart failure at St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 88. A daughter of a Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. grocery store manager and a homemaker, Agnes Edith Ripple was born in Baltimore and raised on 36th Street in Govans. She was a 1940 graduate of Seton High School. In her youth, she enjoyed ice skating and was a semiprofessional bowler at the old North Avenue Sports Center, where she won a Triangle Sports Trophy in 1944.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2011
High school seniors got a lesson this weekend in what it's like to sleep outdoors under cardboard when it rains. It didn't rain exactly. While taking part in a "sleepover" outside a local soup kitchen, some of the students were soaked when a garden irrigation system unexpectedly turned on at 3 in the morning. Nevertheless, a point was made. "The night changed my thoughts about the homeless," said 18-year-old Sunny Odogwu, a senior at St. Frances Academy who lives on Brentwood Avenue.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2011
Jane P. Baker, a homemaker and Our Daily Bread volunteer, died of a heart attack Aug. 24 at the Edenwald retirement community. She was 90 and had lived in Guilford and the Orchards for many years. Born Jane Burton Parr in Portsmouth, Va., she moved to Baltimore as a child and lived in Mount Washington. She was a Cathedral School graduate and met her future husband, attorney George W. Baker, at the Catholic Action Guild, a volunteer club that met at the school. Mrs. Baker was a 1939 Western High School graduate.
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