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By Michael Anft and Michael Anft,Special to The Sun | March 9, 1994
If you're a believer in the pop culture marketplace, then you nTC know that no one loves a murderer like an American does.Popular iconography includes Billy the Kid, John Dillinger, and Bonnie and Clyde. But even those deemed too weird, psychotic or unredeemable for mass hero worship -- Chessman, DeSalvo, Gacy, Bundy -- have had their followings.They are written about, read about, studied by psychiatrists, law enforcers and loners. Recently serial killers have been put on the faces of a line of trading cards.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
The last person you may ever want to spend an evening with is Jeffrey Dahmer, the serial killer of boys and young men. Although the world learned what went on behind the door of Apt. 213 on N. 25th St. in Milwaukee after a would-be victim escaped in 1991, no one has ever really learned what went on in Dahmer's head. Joseph W. Ritsch, co-founder of the recently formed Iron Crow Theatre, has attempted to peer into that psyche. His new play, "Apartment 213," is an absorbing, if not entirely satisfying, work.
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By Los Angeles Times | September 14, 1992
"The Jeffrey Dahmer Murders" will not be coming to a theater near you -- at least not any time soon.The judge who presided over the notorious case of the Wisconsin candymaker-turned-cannibal had planned to write a book and authorize a screenplay based upon his accounts. But the mother of one of Dahmer's 17 victims is trying to stop the publication, and survivors of other victims have filed suits seeking to prevent Dahmer from profiting by selling the rights to his story.Martha Hicks of Akron, Ohio, whose son Steven was killed by Dahmer in 1978, has asked the Wisconsin Judicial Commission to investigate a possible conflict of interest charge against Judge Laurence C. Gram, who presided in the case, based upon her belief that he might have been prejudiced in his rulings, knowing he would later try and capitalize on his experience.
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By Dan Barry and Dan Barry,New York Times News Service | March 11, 2007
COTTAGE GROVE, Wis. -- The big wall clock tells the minister he has less than an hour before this night's Bible class down at the church. No time for supper. He finds his keys in the tight apartment that he and his wife, Susan, have rented for 16 years, shared now with an adult daughter, two cats and a dog. In this space, the clock looms large, a treadmill dominates the living room, and bunny knickknacks everywhere signal the approaching season of rebirth. A goodbye to Susan, a pocket pat to jingle those keys and out he goes into the wintry Wisconsin sunset, Roy Ratcliff, minister of the Mandrake Road Church of Christ in Madison.
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By New York Times News Service | November 30, 1994
MILWAUKEE -- The suspect in the beating death of Jeffrey L. Dahmer is a 25-year-old convicted murderer who went to prison two years ago proclaiming he was the son of God and that a family of voices told him "who I could trust and who was my enemy."The suspect, Christopher Scarver, killed a man in a robbery in 1990, the year before Dahmer was arrested on charges that led to 15 consecutive life terms, a sentence that ended Monday in a pool of blood, next to a toilet.According to court records, the motive in the killing that put Scarver in prison was robbery and vengeance against a job training program that he thought had wronged him. The records show that Scarver shot a 27-year-old job training worker four times in the head and then forced the program site manager to write him a check for $3,000.
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By New York Times News Service | November 29, 1994
Jeffrey L. Dahmer is dead, but the legal battle over his estate is still alive.Several families of Mr. Dahmer's victims sued him and were awarded millions of dollars, and ever since have been trying to gain control of the contents of his Milwaukee apartment, where he killed most of his victims.The families want to auction off some 312 items, including a 55-gallon vat he used to decompose the bodies; the refrigerator where he stored hearts; a saw, a hammer and his toothbrush.Tom Jacobson, the lawyer for the families, said the auction could bring more than $100,000.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | December 1, 1994
Havre de Grace.-- It's a bit of a stretch to say that justice was done when the murderer-cannibal Jeffrey Dahmer was offed by one of his fellow inmates the other day in a Wisconsin prison.On the one hand, getting your brains beaten out in the bathroom isn't traditional due process, particularly in Wisconsin, which in its wisdom rejects capital punishment for any crime.And on the other hand, what was done to Dahmer wasn't nearly as macabre as what he did to many of his victims.Violence, even when it happens to a violent person, is still shocking.
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By Rick Kogan and Rick Kogan,Chicago Tribune | January 28, 1992
CHICAGO -- The phone rang, and when I picked it up, a man said, "How do I get cable TV?" This happens all the time. I told him whom to call, then I asked, as I do all the time, why he wanted cable."
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 30, 1992
Imagine an episode of "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" shot in sepia and set in the very, very damp future about an ex-clown whose meat-packed bones become the objects of desire for a cannibalistic delicatessen owner while various squads of rubber-clad commandos wage guerrilla warfare in the sewers. If you can imagine that, then you don't have to see "Delicatessen," opening today at the Charles. But if you can't, you'd better go see it.The movie, take it from me, is a lot more fun to sit through than to describe in a single sentence.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | January 29, 1992
MILWAUKEE -- With quiet rage and sorrow, they come each day to sit in the courtroom where Jeffrey Lionel Dahmer's mind is on trial. Most are black. They are the victims' families."
NEWS
November 6, 2006
Samuel H. Bowers, 82, Ku Klux Klan leader Samuel H. Bowers, a former Ku Klux Klan imperial wizard who was serving a life sentence for the 1966 bombing death of a civil rights leader, died after suffering cardiopulmonary arrest yesterday in the Mississippi State Penitentiary Hospital in Parchman. He was convicted in August 1998 of ordering the assassination of Vernon Dahmer, a civil rights activist who had fought for black rights during Mississippi's turbulent struggle for racial equality.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2003
FAIRFAX, Va. -- Lawyers for sniper suspect Lee Boyd Malvo will present an insanity defense at the teen-ager's trial next month, contending that Malvo was brainwashed by his alleged accomplice, John Allen Muhammad, and could not tell right from wrong. "This case is so bizarre and the degree of indoctrination is so great that we would be remiss if we didn't let a jury consider this issue," Craig S. Cooley, one of Malvo's two lead attorneys, said outside the Fairfax courthouse while the insanity plea was being filed.
NEWS
By Stories by Stephanie Saul | December 20, 1998
Traveling along the back roads of the Deep South, a landscape rich in legend and history, one can still hear stories of black men meeting horrible deaths at the hands of white mobs, of men tossed from bridges, beaten with beanpoles or shattered by car bombs.In scattered tiny towns, aging white men are living out their days shielded, even embraced, by their communities, despite suspicion and sometimes evidence that they committed these killings against blacks during the civil rights era.Their presence, living freely and unpunished all these years, has magnified the grief of friends and relatives who mourn the black victims.
NEWS
August 28, 1998
THE LESSON of the conviction of the Ku Klux Klan leader who ordered the 1966 murder of Vernon Dahmer is that times are not what they used to be. Thank God. No Mississippi jury 30 years ago would convict a white man of killing an African-American.Sam Bowers ordered fellow Klansmen to do a "No. 4" on Mr. Dahmer. The home of the Hattiesburg, Miss., NAACP leader was set on fire. He died fighting the blaze. Bowers ordered the deed. He was tried three times. Each trial ended with a hung jury.Mr.
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By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1998
As Loyola University professor Charles Marsh labored on his book about religious faith and the civil rights struggle in the Mississippi of 1964, he sometimes wondered whom he was kidding."
NEWS
June 8, 1998
LAWYERS for 73-year-old Sam Bowers are livid. The old Ku Klux Klan leader will be retried this summer for allegedly masterminding the 1966 assassination of Mississippi civil rights leader Vernon Dahmer. "When are they going to retry Brutus for killing Caesar?" asked one attorney.But giving the ancient Roman a posthumous prison term isn't comparable to bringing Bowers to justice. His conviction would send a powerful message to the racist groups that still infest this nation and call him a hero.
NEWS
By Michael L. Rozansky and Michael L. Rozansky,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 29, 1991
MILWAUKEE -- People thought it came through the heating ducts and seeped through the very walls. Sometimes it would all but disappear, only to return with a nauseating vengeance.There were a lot of theories.Food gone bad. Trash that smelled. Dead mice in the walls.Apartment 213.For more than 14 months at the Oxford Apartments, a worn, beige cinder-block building on the west side of Milwaukee, the search for the stench always seemed to take people to the same place.Apartment 213.Across the hall, Pamela Bass tried stuffing towels under her door to keep it out. Upstairs, Nanetta Lowery lived for less than a month in 313 before moving out to escape it.Apartment 213 -- home to the quiet, skinny, blond guy named Jeff Dahmer.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 29, 1994
CHICAGO -- Jeffrey L. Dahmer, whose gruesome exploits of murder, necrophilia and dismemberment shocked the world in 1991, was attacked and killed yesterday in a Wisconsin prison, where he was serving 15 consecutive life terms.Dahmer was 34, older than any of his victims, who ranged in age from 14 to 33.He died of extensive head injuries suffered between 7:50 and 8:10 a.m., when he was found in a pool of blood in a toilet area next to the prison's gym, said Michael Sullivan, secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Corrections.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 29, 1998
HATTIESBURG, Miss. -- Thirty-two years after the Molotov cocktails lighted a frosty Mississippi night, authorities arrested three aging Klansmen yesterday and revived charges against them in the 1966 slaying of Vernon Dahmer, one of this state's most revered civil rights leaders.One of the defendants rousted from their homes yesterday morning was Sam Bowers, the founder and former imperial wizard of the White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, an organization that federal authorities blame for 10 murders and hundreds of other violent acts during the civil rights era.Bowers, a 73-year-old businessman from nearby Laurel, Miss.
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By GARY DORSEY and GARY DORSEY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 1998
In 1994, Loyola College theologian Charles Marsh left Baltimore to return to his childhood home in Mississippi. It was a trip made, at least initially, as a scholarly enterprise.Marsh was journeying back to the Deep South to write a book about different images of God that once battled beneath the surface of the civil rights movement. His focus was 1964, the year the first Imperial Wizard of the White Knights of Ku Klux Klan was crowned and the civil rights movement saw one of its deadliest summers.
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