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By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 3, 1999
MOSCOW -- Peter the Great grabbed the first piece of the Caucasus for Russia in the 18th century when he took over Dagestan, but shortly after he died the court at St. Petersburg, realizing how defiant and difficult the Dagestanis were, engineered a way to give the territory back to the shah of Persia.No one who followed has ever been so level-headed, as the present turmoil in the Caucasus demonstrates.Intent on subjugating the Muslim people of the mountains to the Russian crown, Peter's successors gradually, and bloodily, extended their sway over the region.
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NEWS
April 22, 2013
A 19-year-old naturalized American citizen is accused of committing a crime of violence in the United States, and a gaggle of elected officials are urging for him to be treated as an enemy combatant and placed in the hands of the military. Not just the usual right-wing suspects but Rep. Peter King, Sen. Lindsey Graham and Sen. John McCain are leading the chorus. Thankfully, President Barack Obama did not listen, and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was charged in his hospital bed today by federal officials with using a weapon of mass destruction and malicious destruction of property.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, Erin Cox and Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
An uncle of the two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings said his nephews had brought shame to his family and ethnicity, while their father insisted they were innocent and had been framed. The uncle, Ruslan Tsarni, said Friday from his front lawn in Montgomery Village that he had been following news reports and never could have imagined his brother's children were involved in the attack. He and another brother living in the middle-class Washington suburb said they have been estranged from the suspects' family.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 16, 1999
MOSCOW -- Islamic rebels fighting in southern Russia claimed yesterday to have nearly completed the first stage of their campaign to split a new swath of territory from Moscow's control and announced that they were almost ready to launch a second phase. The assertions of the rebels, who crossed into the republic of Dagestan from the separatist republic of Chechnya just over a week ago, stood in stark contrast to those of the Russian military, which claimed to be only days away from regaining authority over Dagestan.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 7, 2005
MOSCOW - The leader of a violent Islamic militant group believed to be responsible for a wave of shootings and bombings in the southern Russian republic of Dagestan was killed yesterday in a four-hour shootout with police, authorities said. The apparent death of Rasul Makasharipov, a former interpreter for Chechen separatist leader Shamil Basayev, was seen as a significant development for authorities who have been virtually under siege in the republic, which borders the war-torn republic of Chechnya.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 12, 2004
MOSCOW - A Dutch aid worker kidnapped near the war-torn republic of Chechnya nearly two years ago was freed early yesterday, ending an ordeal that had triggered sharp international criticism of Russian authorities accused of complicity in his captivity. Arjan Erkel, 34, who led the North Caucasus mission of Doctors Without Borders, was released before dawn in Dagestan, a Russian republic adjoining Chechnya. He was flown to Moscow yesterday afternoon. Erkel spoke briefly with reporters and did little to clear up the mystery surrounding his 20 months as a prisoner and his safe release.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 10, 2002
MOSCOW - A bomb stuffed with bolts and nails and hidden in roadside bushes ripped through a military parade marking the end of World War II in southwest Russia yesterday, killing at least 36 people, including more than a dozen children, Russian television reported. About 150 people were injured. It was the deadliest terror attack in Russia since September 1999, when a string of apartment-house bombings in Moscow and elsewhere killed more than 300 people. No one immediately claimed responsibility for yesterday's explosion, which ravaged a military band as it marched, surrounded by youngsters and World War II veterans, through Kaspiisk, a town of about 12,000 people in Dagestan province.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 16, 2003
MOSCOW - Chechen rebels took four hostages and killed nine border guards early yesterday in a raid on a remote village in the neighboring Russian republic of Dagestan. The rebels fled from their target, the highland village of Shauri. By evening, Interior Ministry police, border guards and several military helicopters were pursuing them. The band of fighters, driving a stolen truck with hostages in tow, headed into the Caucasus mountains and seemed to be aiming for the Georgian border.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 20, 2001
MOSCOW - A Russian court convicted six men yesterday - sentencing two of them to life terms - in the September 1999 bombing of an apartment building in the republic of Dagestan. The blast was the first of a series of bombings that killed 367 Russians and injured more than 650 others in late 1999 and mobilized public opinion in favor of the war against separatist rebels in Chechnya, which borders Dagestan. The trial, which started in late November, is the first court proceeding brought by Russian prosecutors to pin responsibility for the wave of apartment bombings that also incited then-Prime Minister Vladimir Putin to escalate a limited military action into a full-scale military assault to crush the Chechen resistance, a battle that festers as a low-intensity conflict of skirmishes and mine warfare.
NEWS
August 10, 1999
RUSSIAN President Boris N. Yeltsin is so erratic in his behavior that questions may be raised whether Vladimir Putin is truly his final choice for the next Kremlin leader. Even so, Mr. Putin, 47, has outstanding qualifications to rule unruly, corrupt and disorganized Russia, if it comes to that.His espionage activities in Germany and leadership of the Federal Security Service -- the main successor of the KGB -- have given Mr. Putin a good understanding of the modern world outside Russia.His work as the first deputy to St. Petersburg Mayor Anatoly Sobchak put him in close contact with all of Russia's reformist politicians.
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