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By BOSTON GLOBE | August 20, 1999
MOSCOW -- Russia acknowledged yesterday that its campaign to suppress an Islamic rebellion in Dagestan was not working, a stark reversal of almost daily assurances that it would crush the rebels within a week.As federal troops reported their heaviest losses in the 13-day conflict, a senior Russian commander said Moscow was rethinking the tactics it was using to dislodge armed militants who have declared an independent Islamic state in the rugged Caucasus region.It was the clearest sign that the military has begun to accept what independent observers have been saying: Russia faces a long, drawn-out struggle against the 2,000 followers of renegade Chechen commander Shamil Basayev.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | April 23, 2013
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the younger of the two brothers accused of perpetrating the Boston Marathon bombing, is the baffling mystery man in this crime. His older brother, Tamerlan, who died in a shootout with police in the dark early hours Friday morning, better fits the stereotype of a disaffected, nascent terrorist. He was nearing adulthood when he came to this country from Russia's predominantly Muslim central Asian region. He talked of having no American friends. He had openly disdained the immorality of American society and adopted a zealous brand of Islam.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 12, 1999
MOSCOW -- Russia began arming local volunteers in Dagestan yesterday, handing out firearms to hundreds of retired soldiers in a desperate effort to cut off a rebel incursion into the southern republic before it becomes a guerrilla war.In the central square of Dagestan's capital, Makhachkala, about 300 irregulars -- wearing civilian clothes or pieces of uniforms -- shouldered their weapons and boarded buses for the combat zone along the region's border with...
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 7, 2005
MOSCOW - The leader of a violent Islamic militant group believed to be responsible for a wave of shootings and bombings in the southern Russian republic of Dagestan was killed yesterday in a four-hour shootout with police, authorities said. The apparent death of Rasul Makasharipov, a former interpreter for Chechen separatist leader Shamil Basayev, was seen as a significant development for authorities who have been virtually under siege in the republic, which borders the war-torn republic of Chechnya.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 13, 1999
MOSCOW -- Amid signs that fighting in the Russian republic of Dagestan has spread into neighboring Chechnya, military officials admitted for the first time yesterday that they faced serious problems in their bid to control a guerrilla rebellion in the troubled southern republic.Russian planes continued rocket and bomb attacks in the area of seven Dagestani villages seized by Islamic militants who invaded from nearby Chechnya last weekend.The Russian claims in recent days that soldiers of the Interior and Defense ministries and Dagestani police had forced the rebels to retreat appeared increasingly questionable, as a senior official in the regional government conceded that the Russian efforts were disorganized.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 1999
MOSCOW -- Islamic rebels in southern Russia reopened their war for independence yesterday by launching a new incursion into the republic of Dagestan hours after a car bomb exploded in a military housing block there, killing at least 22 people.Russian officials said the incursion and the car bomb were "links in the same chain," demonstrating that despite Russian declarations of victory two weeks ago, religious and political unrest continues unabated in the volatile Caucasus region.The incursion by several thousand rebel fighters from bases in separatist Chechnya was the second into Dagestan in a month.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 29, 1999
MOSCOW -- When Russia's prime minister made a surprise visit to Dagestan Friday he handed out medals all around to the fighters who had driven a band of Islamic rebels out of the mountains and back into Chechnya, but no one is pretending that the latest war in the Caucasus is over.The rebel leader, Shamil Basaev, had ordered his men to pull back from the villages they had seized in western Dagestan after they took a pounding from Russian planes and artillery, but he vowed last week to take the fight to Russia in other ways and other places.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 9, 1999
MOSCOW -- Every night, Russian television news programs show tanks firing and bombers bombing in Dagestan. Ordnance explodes and smoke billows in the mountain valleys. But some here are beginning to suspect that this latest war in the Caucasus is not all that it seems.Two weeks ago, Islamic militants led by Shamil Basayev stopped fighting and melted back across the border into neighboring Chechnya, leaving the Russian air force to spend several hours flattening what was by then a deserted village.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 15, 1999
MOSCOW -- A deep sense of suspicion settled over this city yesterday as Russians tried to grasp what could be behind the apartment-house bombings that have killed hundreds and thrown the whole country into a state of anxiety. Police searched traffic coming into Moscow and said they had checked nearly all the city's 30,000 residential buildings. Ordinary Muscovites made hundreds -- perhaps thousands -- of calls to a police hot line to report suspicious people and packages. Some of the country's leaders have blamed an international conspiracy of Islamic extremists.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 24, 1999
MOSCOW -- Russia was on the verge of a second war in Chechnya yesterday after the air force bombed the airport in Grozny, capital of the breakaway republic.Frustrated in its attempts to wipe out Islamic rebels who have twice seized villages in neighboring Dagestan, Moscow seems intent on escalating the fighting and bringing it home to Chechnya.Military leaders said they were determined to avoid a repetition of the disastrous war of 1994-1996, which left as many as 80,000 dead and led to the virtual independence of the Caucasus republic.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 12, 2004
MOSCOW - A Dutch aid worker kidnapped near the war-torn republic of Chechnya nearly two years ago was freed early yesterday, ending an ordeal that had triggered sharp international criticism of Russian authorities accused of complicity in his captivity. Arjan Erkel, 34, who led the North Caucasus mission of Doctors Without Borders, was released before dawn in Dagestan, a Russian republic adjoining Chechnya. He was flown to Moscow yesterday afternoon. Erkel spoke briefly with reporters and did little to clear up the mystery surrounding his 20 months as a prisoner and his safe release.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 16, 2003
MOSCOW - Chechen rebels took four hostages and killed nine border guards early yesterday in a raid on a remote village in the neighboring Russian republic of Dagestan. The rebels fled from their target, the highland village of Shauri. By evening, Interior Ministry police, border guards and several military helicopters were pursuing them. The band of fighters, driving a stolen truck with hostages in tow, headed into the Caucasus mountains and seemed to be aiming for the Georgian border.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 10, 2002
MOSCOW - A bomb stuffed with bolts and nails and hidden in roadside bushes ripped through a military parade marking the end of World War II in southwest Russia yesterday, killing at least 36 people, including more than a dozen children, Russian television reported. About 150 people were injured. It was the deadliest terror attack in Russia since September 1999, when a string of apartment-house bombings in Moscow and elsewhere killed more than 300 people. No one immediately claimed responsibility for yesterday's explosion, which ravaged a military band as it marched, surrounded by youngsters and World War II veterans, through Kaspiisk, a town of about 12,000 people in Dagestan province.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 3, 1999
MOSCOW -- Peter the Great grabbed the first piece of the Caucasus for Russia in the 18th century when he took over Dagestan, but shortly after he died the court at St. Petersburg, realizing how defiant and difficult the Dagestanis were, engineered a way to give the territory back to the shah of Persia.No one who followed has ever been so level-headed, as the present turmoil in the Caucasus demonstrates.Intent on subjugating the Muslim people of the mountains to the Russian crown, Peter's successors gradually, and bloodily, extended their sway over the region.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 24, 1999
MOSCOW -- Russia was on the verge of a second war in Chechnya yesterday after the air force bombed the airport in Grozny, capital of the breakaway republic.Frustrated in its attempts to wipe out Islamic rebels who have twice seized villages in neighboring Dagestan, Moscow seems intent on escalating the fighting and bringing it home to Chechnya.Military leaders said they were determined to avoid a repetition of the disastrous war of 1994-1996, which left as many as 80,000 dead and led to the virtual independence of the Caucasus republic.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 15, 1999
MOSCOW -- A deep sense of suspicion settled over this city yesterday as Russians tried to grasp what could be behind the apartment-house bombings that have killed hundreds and thrown the whole country into a state of anxiety. Police searched traffic coming into Moscow and said they had checked nearly all the city's 30,000 residential buildings. Ordinary Muscovites made hundreds -- perhaps thousands -- of calls to a police hot line to report suspicious people and packages. Some of the country's leaders have blamed an international conspiracy of Islamic extremists.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 13, 1996
PERVOMAYSKAYA, Russia -- Chechen gunmen played a harrowing game of cat and mouse with their swelling store of hostages yesterday, scattering human pawns across this armor-encircled village to raise the stakes for Russian government forces pondering an all-out attack.The five-day standoff between the Kremlin and gunmen ready to die for a free Chechnya seemed frozen by both icy winds and hesitation, with neither side giving way in a stare-down that appeared to leave few alternatives for settlement aside from bloodletting.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 3, 1999
MOSCOW -- Peter the Great grabbed the first piece of the Caucasus for Russia in the 18th century when he took over Dagestan, but shortly after he died the court at St. Petersburg, realizing how defiant and difficult the Dagestanis were, engineered a way to give the territory back to the shah of Persia.No one who followed has ever been so level-headed, as the present turmoil in the Caucasus demonstrates.Intent on subjugating the Muslim people of the mountains to the Russian crown, Peter's successors gradually, and bloodily, extended their sway over the region.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 9, 1999
MOSCOW -- Every night, Russian television news programs show tanks firing and bombers bombing in Dagestan. Ordnance explodes and smoke billows in the mountain valleys. But some here are beginning to suspect that this latest war in the Caucasus is not all that it seems.Two weeks ago, Islamic militants led by Shamil Basayev stopped fighting and melted back across the border into neighboring Chechnya, leaving the Russian air force to spend several hours flattening what was by then a deserted village.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 1999
MOSCOW -- Islamic rebels in southern Russia reopened their war for independence yesterday by launching a new incursion into the republic of Dagestan hours after a car bomb exploded in a military housing block there, killing at least 22 people.Russian officials said the incursion and the car bomb were "links in the same chain," demonstrating that despite Russian declarations of victory two weeks ago, religious and political unrest continues unabated in the volatile Caucasus region.The incursion by several thousand rebel fighters from bases in separatist Chechnya was the second into Dagestan in a month.
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