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By Craig Eisendrath and By Craig Eisendrath,Special to the Sun | August 8, 1999
"The Last Survivor: In Search of Martin Zaidenstadt," by Timothy W. Ryback. Pantheon Books. 208 pages. $21.In 1992, when Timothy W. Ryback first visited Dachau on assignment for the New Yorker, his purpose was to explore what it was like to live in a city whose very name is a synonym for hell. Here was the first Nazi concentration camp, the first gas chamber, the first crematorium and the first Nazi medical experiments on human beings.Since then, Ryback has returned to Dachau over and over again.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Picky, Wordville's British honorary consul, recommends consideration of the peroration of A.J.P. Taylor's English History 1914-1945 . "The rhythm is particularly effective, I think," he says. Let's have a look:   In the second World War the British people came of age. This was a people's war. Not only were their needs considered. They themselves wanted to win. Future historians may see the war as a last struggle for the European balance of power or for the maintenance of Empire.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 30, 1995
They were there when the organized killing stopped at Dachau 50 years ago, April 29, 1945, and liberation miraculously arrived, and now they meet this weekend at Beth Israel Congregation in Owings Mills, still trying to explain their story, still attempting to find the grammar of hell.Felix Kestenberg, 74 years old now, was one of those sent off from the Nazi death camp, assigned to be transported to the Alpine Mountains to be shot. Dr. Alvin Weinstein, 77 now, marched into the camp that day with the American 22nd Infantry, Rainbow Division, the first medical doctor to enter Dachau.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | July 25, 2008
Felix Kestenberg, who survived eight concentration camps and two death marches during World War II, died Tuesday of a stroke at Sinai Hospital. The Mount Washington resident was 86. Mr. Kestenberg, the son of a shoe manufacturer, was born and raised in Radom, Poland. During the years of the Nazi horror that engulfed Europe, Mr. Kestenberg lost three elder siblings and his father. Beginning in 1939, when the Germans occupied Poland, and a few months before his 19th birthday, he was taken from his home and sent to a labor camp, where he worked on the fortification of the border with Russia.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Sun Staff Writer | July 15, 1995
Joseph Ulrich Kauffman Jr., who was among the first U.S. servicemen who liberated the Dachau concentration camp 50 years ago, died Tuesday at Sinai Hospital after a brief illness. He was 72 and lived in the Hampton area of Towson.Mr. Kauffman, who was chairman of Kauffman Electric Co. in Highlandtown, never forgot the horrors he saw that day he entered the Nazi camp as a 20-year-old soldier with an Army Signal Service battalion -- yet he couldn't mention the atrocities of the death camp to members of his family until just five years ago, said his wife of 49 years, the former Doris Berg.
NEWS
December 14, 1998
William D. Denson, 85, who was chief prosecutor for the United States in Nazi war crimes trials in Dachau, Germany, died in his sleep yesterday at home in Lawrence, N.Y. He was chief prosecutor for atrocities committed in four concentration camps -- Dachau, Mauthausen, Flossenberg and Buchenwald.Pub Date: 12/14/98
NEWS
April 24, 1997
Herbert Zipper,92, a Viennese conductor whose life became the subject of an Academy Award-nominated documentary, died of lung cancer Monday in Santa Monica, Calif.He was imprisoned by the Nazis in the Dachau concentration camp, where he recruited fellow inmates to give secret concerts to raise the spirits of other prisoners. Mr. Zipper, who was Jewish, co-wrote "Dachau Song," a resistance song that spread from prison camp to prison camp. The song was published in 1992. "Never Give Up: The 20th Century Odyssey of Herbert Zipper" was nominated for an Oscar last year.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Picky, Wordville's British honorary consul, recommends consideration of the peroration of A.J.P. Taylor's English History 1914-1945 . "The rhythm is particularly effective, I think," he says. Let's have a look:   In the second World War the British people came of age. This was a people's war. Not only were their needs considered. They themselves wanted to win. Future historians may see the war as a last struggle for the European balance of power or for the maintenance of Empire.
NEWS
By Joshua M. Greene | May 16, 2003
U.S. AUTHORITIES recently appointed former Baath Party leaders to help rebuild Iraq. Shortly afterward, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld announced that senior Baath Party members would not be allowed to retain positions of authority in the new Iraqi administration. The assumption is that, in time, people will step forward, identify appointees who were Baath Party members and those appointees will be removed. There are risks in such assumptions. At the end of World War II, in a similar effort to rebuild a defeated enemy country, U.S. officials released Nazi Party members from prison.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | July 25, 2008
Felix Kestenberg, who survived eight concentration camps and two death marches during World War II, died Tuesday of a stroke at Sinai Hospital. The Mount Washington resident was 86. Mr. Kestenberg, the son of a shoe manufacturer, was born and raised in Radom, Poland. During the years of the Nazi horror that engulfed Europe, Mr. Kestenberg lost three elder siblings and his father. Beginning in 1939, when the Germans occupied Poland, and a few months before his 19th birthday, he was taken from his home and sent to a labor camp, where he worked on the fortification of the border with Russia.
NEWS
By Joshua M. Greene | May 16, 2003
U.S. AUTHORITIES recently appointed former Baath Party leaders to help rebuild Iraq. Shortly afterward, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld announced that senior Baath Party members would not be allowed to retain positions of authority in the new Iraqi administration. The assumption is that, in time, people will step forward, identify appointees who were Baath Party members and those appointees will be removed. There are risks in such assumptions. At the end of World War II, in a similar effort to rebuild a defeated enemy country, U.S. officials released Nazi Party members from prison.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Eisendrath and By Craig Eisendrath,Special to the Sun | August 8, 1999
"The Last Survivor: In Search of Martin Zaidenstadt," by Timothy W. Ryback. Pantheon Books. 208 pages. $21.In 1992, when Timothy W. Ryback first visited Dachau on assignment for the New Yorker, his purpose was to explore what it was like to live in a city whose very name is a synonym for hell. Here was the first Nazi concentration camp, the first gas chamber, the first crematorium and the first Nazi medical experiments on human beings.Since then, Ryback has returned to Dachau over and over again.
NEWS
December 14, 1998
William D. Denson, 85, who was chief prosecutor for the United States in Nazi war crimes trials in Dachau, Germany, died in his sleep yesterday at home in Lawrence, N.Y. He was chief prosecutor for atrocities committed in four concentration camps -- Dachau, Mauthausen, Flossenberg and Buchenwald.Pub Date: 12/14/98
NEWS
April 24, 1997
Herbert Zipper,92, a Viennese conductor whose life became the subject of an Academy Award-nominated documentary, died of lung cancer Monday in Santa Monica, Calif.He was imprisoned by the Nazis in the Dachau concentration camp, where he recruited fellow inmates to give secret concerts to raise the spirits of other prisoners. Mr. Zipper, who was Jewish, co-wrote "Dachau Song," a resistance song that spread from prison camp to prison camp. The song was published in 1992. "Never Give Up: The 20th Century Odyssey of Herbert Zipper" was nominated for an Oscar last year.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Sun Staff Writer | July 15, 1995
Joseph Ulrich Kauffman Jr., who was among the first U.S. servicemen who liberated the Dachau concentration camp 50 years ago, died Tuesday at Sinai Hospital after a brief illness. He was 72 and lived in the Hampton area of Towson.Mr. Kauffman, who was chairman of Kauffman Electric Co. in Highlandtown, never forgot the horrors he saw that day he entered the Nazi camp as a 20-year-old soldier with an Army Signal Service battalion -- yet he couldn't mention the atrocities of the death camp to members of his family until just five years ago, said his wife of 49 years, the former Doris Berg.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Sun Staff Writer | May 1, 1995
He was a young Army officer with the 29th Division, who survived the horrors of D-Day, but was not prepared for what he saw behind the gate of the Nazi slave labor camp of Dora-Mittelbau near Nordhausen, Germany on an April day in 1945."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Sun Staff Writer | May 1, 1995
He was a young Army officer with the 29th Division, who survived the horrors of D-Day, but was not prepared for what he saw behind the gate of the Nazi slave labor camp of Dora-Mittelbau near Nordhausen, Germany on an April day in 1945."
TRAVEL
By CHRISTOPHER KELLY and CHRISTOPHER KELLY,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | January 8, 2006
MUNICH, GERMANY -- In the rapid-fire opening scenes of Steven Spielberg's new film Munich, the audience is instantly launched back to Sept. 5, 1972, when all eyes turned toward this city and the horror that unfolded at the Olympic games here. "The Munich Massacre," as it would come to be called, began at 4 a.m., when a Palestinian terrorist group called Black September invaded the rooms of a group of Israeli athletes, and ended the next day with all 11 athletes dead. However, the bulk of the film has very little to do with the Olympics or with the city of Munich.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 30, 1995
They were there when the organized killing stopped at Dachau 50 years ago, April 29, 1945, and liberation miraculously arrived, and now they meet this weekend at Beth Israel Congregation in Owings Mills, still trying to explain their story, still attempting to find the grammar of hell.Felix Kestenberg, 74 years old now, was one of those sent off from the Nazi death camp, assigned to be transported to the Alpine Mountains to be shot. Dr. Alvin Weinstein, 77 now, marched into the camp that day with the American 22nd Infantry, Rainbow Division, the first medical doctor to enter Dachau.
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