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By NEW YORK TIMES | November 6, 2005
After more than two years dominating The New York Times best-seller list, The Da Vinci Code, by Dan Brown, is dropping off the list, at least temporarily. In the week ended Oct. 29, The Da Vinci Code ranked 16th in the statistically weighted survey of almost 4,000 bookstores and wholesalers serving 50,000 other retailers. Therefore, it will be missing from the list of the top 15 best-selling books, to be published in the Nov. 13 edition of The Times Book Review. On the list to be published today, The Da Vinci Code ranks No. 12, in its 136th consecutive week on the list.
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By FROM SUN STAFF AND NEWS SERVICES | April 21, 2009
Beyonce to bring tour to D.C. in June Beyonce will bring her "I Am ..." tour to Washington's Verizon Center on June 24. Tickets ($20.75 to $125.75) go on sale through Ticketmaster at 10 a.m. Saturday. Call 410-547-7328 or go to ticketmaster.com. Rashod D. Ollison Politics of Hollywood Barry Levinson's Poliwood will have its local premiere at the Maryland Film Festival next month. The movie, shot during 2008's Democratic and Republican conventions and the inauguration, is a "film essay" on the confluence of media, celebrities - such as Matthew Modine, Ellen Burstyn and Anne Hathaway - and politics, says MFF head Jed Dietz.
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FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 18, 2006
The perspiration spraying from the screen during The Da Vinci Code is not from the hero and heroine outrunning forces set on framing them for multiple murders. It's from director Ron Howard and screenwriter Akiva Goldsman sweating buckets of unholy water as they try to stay on top of novelist Dan Brown's heavy, exposition-riddled plot. Within minutes it throws them off the saddle. Their movie isn't exciting, just hectic. The Da Vinci Code lacks suspense, momentum and visual panache. This international chase melodrama, which yesterday had its world premiere at the Cannes Film Festival and tomorrow opens nationally, has neither the humor, thrills and adult sexuality of North By Northwest nor the humor, thrills and grade-school sexuality of National Treasure.
NEWS
December 1, 2007
RICHARD LEIGH, 64 Best-selling author Richard Leigh, a writer of speculative history who unsuccessfully sued for plagiarism over themes in Dan Brown's blockbuster novel The Da Vinci Code, died Nov. 21 in London of complications from a heart condition, his agent said. The U.S.-born Mr. Leigh, who had lived in Britain for three decades, was co-author of Holy Blood, Holy Grail, a work of nonfiction that claimed Jesus Christ fathered a child with Mary Magdalene and that the bloodline continues.
FEATURES
By John Horn and John Horn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 8, 2005
HOLLYWOOD - Not a single foot of film has been shot, the movie doesn't open for a year and a few critics already are denouncing it, but The Da Vinci Code nevertheless has made its multiplex debut. Sony Pictures, the studio behind the Ron Howard-directed adaptation of Dan Brown's mammoth best-selling novel, has released a short Da Vinci Code trailer, which has been playing in a number of theaters just before Star Wars: Episode III Revenge of the Sith. The "teaser" trailer, as such early previews are called, is debuting just as Britain's Westminster Abbey announced it would not allow Howard's movie to film there because the abbey considers the book "theologically unsound."
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | October 25, 2004
They came in masses: teachers, social workers, even the odd biblical scholar, filling the 420-seat auditorium at the Walters Art Museum and spilling into the hallway. Some drove for an hour or more on a work night to watch five people sit on stage and talk about a book. Such is the appeal of The Da Vinci Code, Dan Brown's fictional treatise that melds together the works of Leonardo da Vinci, Catholicism, the Holy Grail, murder and secret societies. Barely 19 months after it was published, the book's publisher already is claiming that it is the most popular hardcover book yet printed.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 10, 2006
BEIJING --Chinese authorities ordered theaters nationwide to stop showing The Da Vinci Code yesterday after Chinese Catholics warned that the film could threaten social stability. The film, based on the best-selling novel by Dan Brown, has long been criticized as insulting to the Catholic Church but has already earned more at the box office than any other film shown in China this year, and it was seen within the local industry as a contender to overtake Titanic as the highest-grossing film here in history.
FEATURES
By RON DICKER and RON DICKER,HARTFORD COURANT | May 19, 2006
When screenwriter Akiva Goldsman sat down to adapt The Da Vinci Code, he was not thinking about how many copies of Dan Brown's book had been sold, or how many splashy headlines had been spawned by the controversy that surrounded it, or even how to deal with the Catholic Church's outrage at an allegedly blasphemous story. Instead, the writer says, he simply focused on the task at hand. "As I'm writing I'm thinking how to get in and out of the first act," Goldsman says. "With any adaptation, you sort of have to put your head down and do the work, and politics has to come second to doing your job."
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 7, 2004
Fans of Dan Brown, author of The Da Vinci Code, have been obsessed with his next book since he revealed earlier this year that The Da Vinci Code cover contains clues about his next novel. What it does not contain is the title, which will be The Solomon Key, a nugget Brown's publisher, Stephen Rubin, let slip recently during a lunch with reporters who cover the book industry. The book, whose release date has not been announced, is likely to be the most anticipated novel to hit stores in years, not least because The Da Vinci Code, published in March 2003, is still selling tens of thousands of copies a week.
NEWS
By ELLIS EASTERLY | April 16, 2006
Not too long ago, I received an e-mail from a very confused former student of mine. She had just finished reading Dan Brown's best-selling thriller, The Da Vinci Code. She asked what many others are asking: Is what the book says about Jesus true? As if mere confusion were not enough, large numbers of readers are convinced that what the book portrays is largely accurate, even though the hardcover dust jacket says, in small print, "A novel." We must now brace ourselves for more damage control.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | January 12, 2007
In five minutes on the Internet, you can find all of the Masons' passwords and secrets," said Brent Morris. "But I'm not going to tell you. It's a matter of honor."
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | November 12, 2006
THE DA VINCI CODE -- Sony Pictures Home Entertainment -- $29.96 Ron Howard's too-faithful film version of The Da Vinci Code serves as an engrossing travelogue and an intriguing exercise in faux history and even faux-er theology. That it never proves as cunningly compelling as Dan Brown's giddy pleasure of a book is less the fault of the story than of Howard's unwillingness to take the necessary liberties to make it more cinematic. Tom Hanks, partnered with Howard for a third time (after Splash and Apollo 13)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | November 10, 2006
Most film companies stick trailers for their coming releases at the beginning of their DVDs. Is it fair that people anxious to watch The Da Vinci Code on their home TV are asked first to wade through coming attractions for three other DVD releases, including All The King's Men? At least that DVD allows viewers to skip over the trailers if they want. Others are not so considerate, effectively disabling the skip function so that one has to watch the trailers to get to the feature. But when you've shelled out $25 to own a movie, should you have to sit through ads as well?
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2006
VATICAN CITY -- Pope Benedict XVI made his most important change yet in the Vatican hierarchy yesterday, placing in the church's No. 2 position a conservative cardinal who once tried to lead a boycott of the novel The Da Vinci Code. The Vatican announced the appointment of Italian Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone of Genoa as secretary of state, a position similar to that of prime minister. He will succeed Cardinal Angelo Sodano, 78, who held the post for 15 years and became especially powerful as the health of Pope John Paul II deteriorated.
NEWS
By DAN HAMILTON | June 12, 2006
Want to win at English? Learn German. That's the unexpected message of the 2006 Scripps National Spelling Bee finals. America's new national champion, Katharine Close, won by spelling ursprache. The runner-up, Finola Mei Hwa Hackett, tripped up on weltschmerz. Another favorite lost on heiligenschein. Katharine might be excused for a shade of schadenfreude as she watched her friends falter, because behind all the prime-time glitz and angst was a simple lesson. German and English are both Germanic languages.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 10, 2006
BEIJING --Chinese authorities ordered theaters nationwide to stop showing The Da Vinci Code yesterday after Chinese Catholics warned that the film could threaten social stability. The film, based on the best-selling novel by Dan Brown, has long been criticized as insulting to the Catholic Church but has already earned more at the box office than any other film shown in China this year, and it was seen within the local industry as a contender to overtake Titanic as the highest-grossing film here in history.
NEWS
December 1, 2007
RICHARD LEIGH, 64 Best-selling author Richard Leigh, a writer of speculative history who unsuccessfully sued for plagiarism over themes in Dan Brown's blockbuster novel The Da Vinci Code, died Nov. 21 in London of complications from a heart condition, his agent said. The U.S.-born Mr. Leigh, who had lived in Britain for three decades, was co-author of Holy Blood, Holy Grail, a work of nonfiction that claimed Jesus Christ fathered a child with Mary Magdalene and that the bloodline continues.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | November 10, 2006
Most film companies stick trailers for their coming releases at the beginning of their DVDs. Is it fair that people anxious to watch The Da Vinci Code on their home TV are asked first to wade through coming attractions for three other DVD releases, including All The King's Men? At least that DVD allows viewers to skip over the trailers if they want. Others are not so considerate, effectively disabling the skip function so that one has to watch the trailers to get to the feature. But when you've shelled out $25 to own a movie, should you have to sit through ads as well?
NEWS
May 25, 2006
Investigations abuse the power of the IRS Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s instigation of an Internal Revenue Service investigation of the NAACP when he was a member of Congress didn't simply do damage to nonprofit advocacy groups such as the NAACP that are engaged in constitutionally protected free speech ("Ehrlich defends 2001 IRS inquiry," May 20). Mr. Ehrlich and other House and Senate Republicans, who hid behind constituents' requests to explain their calls for an investigation of the NAACP, also did damage to the Internal Revenue Service itself.
TRAVEL
By SUSAN SPANO and SUSAN SPANO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 2006
PARIS -- When The Da Vinci Code opens this weekend in the United States, one of the first places moviegoers will see is the Louvre, where the story starts. Director Ron Howard was allowed to film in the museum, so moviegoers will see the real thing: architect I.M. Pei's Pyramid, the 1,450-foot Grande Galerie and the Salle des Etats where Leonardo da Vinci's "Mona Lisa" hangs. Since the filming there last spring, the museum has distanced itself from the movie, reflecting the French art establishment's well-known scorn for popular culture and the Louvre's weariness with the phenomenon created by The Da Vinci Code, Dan Brown's controversial 2003 mystery about the supposed secret history of Christianity.
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