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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1997
Warning: Here's your last chance this season to watch a new episode of "The Practice," one of the year's best new dramas."Home Improvement" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m. and 9 p.m.-9: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Two rebroadcasts for the price of one. And you don't have to sit through an episode of the dying-to-get-off-the-air "Roseanne," which is getting pre-empted for one night only. Instead, you first get to watch as Tim and Jill dream what their lives will be like in 35 years, then watch again as Brad gets his first part-time job. ABC."
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By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
They have so much in common, these three long-dead holy women, their corpses dripping with jewels, that it's as though they've been calling back and forth to one another from across the centuries. Now that their images are in the same room at the American Visionary Art Museum , the murmur of their voices is almost audible. There's St. Kateri, holding a bouquet of her talisman - lilies - and reciting the Lord's Prayer in the Mohawk language. Embedded in the icon is a vial of water taken from the spring where Kateri lived in the 17th century.
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By Ron Grossman and Ron Grossman,Chicago Tribune | January 5, 1992
LEONARDO.Serge Bramly.HarperCollins.404 pages. $35. Leonardo da Vinci was the Orson Welles of the Italian Renaissance. Like Hollywood's perennial enfant terrible, da Vinci always promised more than he delivered. In fact, like Welles, da Vinci is known almost as much for what he didn't accomplish as for the tiny handful of works he left behind. According to Serge Bramly, his latest biographer, only 13 paintings by his hand have survived. In addition, we have seven others that he either worked on while still an apprentice in the studio of his master, Verrocchio, or that da Vinci's students painted according to his outlines.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2009
TODAY SCIENCE UNCORKED: THE GENIUS OF WINE: What could be more genius than pairing a wine tasting with an exhibit about Leonardo da Vinci's great inventions? This event pays tribute to da Vinci's homeland by featuring the wines of Italy. Guests at the Maryland Science Center, 601 Light St., will learn about Italian wine regions and vintages from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tickets are $40 for members, $45 for nonmembers. Admission includes wine, food and a tour of "Da Vinci: The Genius." All participants must be 21 or older.
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By Andrew C. Revkin and Andrew C. Revkin,New York Times News Service | August 4, 1999
BEACON, N.Y. -- Five hundred years ago, Leonardo da Vinci's long-held plan to cast a 24-foot-tall bronze horse for his patron, Duke Lodovico Sforza of Milan, crumbled when invading French troops used the full-size clay model for crossbow practice.Leonardo never completed the piece, which would have been the largest equestrian sculpture in the world, and some biographical accounts have him crying on his deathbed over the unfulfilled vision.Leonardo's dream, first articulated as a postage-stamp-size sketch, was revealed in three jaw-dropping dimensions, in the form of a proudly prancing 15-ton bronze stallion that was cast and assembled at a foundry here, 60 miles north of New York City.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH | November 12, 2006
THE DA VINCI CODE -- Sony Pictures Home Entertainment -- $29.96 Ron Howard's too-faithful film version of The Da Vinci Code serves as an engrossing travelogue and an intriguing exercise in faux history and even faux-er theology. That it never proves as cunningly compelling as Dan Brown's giddy pleasure of a book is less the fault of the story than of Howard's unwillingness to take the necessary liberties to make it more cinematic. Tom Hanks, partnered with Howard for a third time (after Splash and Apollo 13)
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 7, 2004
On the most basic level, part of all creativity is probably rooted in play. The spark of imagination and invention can't be far removed from the impulse to make believe, or to simply say, "What if?" Playing around - even child's play - is central to Measuring Man, Daniel Stein and Robert Smythe's intriguingly irreverent show about Leonardo da Vinci, running through tomorrow at the Theatre Project. Both men - and their director and co-creator, Fred Curchack - are accomplished theater artists whose history with the Theatre Project dates back more than a decade.
NEWS
By New York Daily News | August 3, 1993
NEW YORK -- If only Mona Lisa could watch the drama unfolding in New Jersey, she might smile.Art historians have argued throughout this century about the authenticity of a near-look-alike version of Leonardo da Vinci's masterpiece -- a somewhat younger and thinner Mona, but pretty much the same woman -- sitting today somewhere in a New Jersey bank vault.Now, the Vernon family -- the descendants of William Henry Vernon, noted friend of Ben Franklin, John Adams and Marie Antoinette of France -- is ready to cash in."
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By Pamela J. Gray and Pamela J. Gray,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 26, 2005
Two years ago, when 63-year-old John Lombardo took early retirement from his job as a maintenance engineer at Verizon, he expected to have some fun. "I thought that my wife and I could go where we wanted to go and do what we wanted to do. But so far, we haven't been very far from home," says the Towson resident. "In 40 years of working, I had seven days absence due to illness," he says. But soon after he retired, a blood test and subsequent biopsy revealed that Lombardo had prostate cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. He scheduled surgery with Dr. Thomas Smyth, a urologist at St. Joseph Medical Center, for January.
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By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | April 20, 1997
Reggie didn't get it."Who cares about some guy who died nearly 500 years ago?" she groused in the museum lobby, one eye on the shopping mall across the street.That this particular "guy" happened to be Leonardo da Vinci, one of the most creative thinkers of all time, didn't make any difference. Nor was my 11-year-old daughter moved to learn that this massive (15,000-square-foot) Boston Museum of Science exhibit is the largest ever to explore da Vinci's brilliance as a scientist and inventor as well as an artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 1, 2009
Painter. Scientist. Inventor. Designer. Engineer. Visionary. Genius. Has there ever been a man with more labels attached to his name than Leonardo da Vinci? Probably not. In a world where mere mortals struggle to master just one profession, da Vinci seemed to master them all. He painted "The Mona Lisa" more than 500 years ago, and it's still probably the most famous painting in the world. He was a key developer of the camera obscura, an early projection device whose descendants include the still camera.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 6, 2009
Series Chuck:: Scott Bakula and Chevy Chase guest star on a new episode. (8 p.m., WBAL-Channel 11) House:: The singer-actor known as Meat Loaf guest stars on a new episode of the medical drama. (8 p.m., WBFF-Channel 45) The Hills:: The reality series about the lives and loves of the young and vacuous returns. (10 p.m., MTV) Specials The Da Vinci Shroud:: Experts seek a connection between Leonardo da Vinci and the Shroud of Turin in this special. (9 p.m., Discovery) Movies The Wild One:: Turner Classic Movies kicks off a biker movie marathon with this 1954 classic starring Marlon Brando.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | January 4, 2009
In Leonardo da Vinci's famous painting, Mona Lisa gazes off into the distance, smiling faintly and, some say, mysteriously. But on the walls of a West Annapolis art supply store, Mona Lisa stands behind prison bars, sports a nose ring and hawks everything from eclairs to sushi. She grimaces, smokes a cigarette and grins to reveal a mouthful of oversized teeth. For two decades, customers and staff have brought renderings of that image to Art Things on Annapolis Street. More than 500 versions of her face decorate the walls and windows of the shop.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | January 4, 2009
In Leonardo da Vinci's famous painting, Mona Lisa gazes off into the distance, smiling faintly and, some say, mysteriously. But on the walls of a West Annapolis art supply store, Mona Lisa stands behind prison bars, sports a nose ring and hawks everything from eclairs to sushi. She grimaces, smokes a cigarette and grins to reveal a mouthful of oversized teeth. For two decades, customers and staff have brought renderings of that image to Art Things on Annapolis Street. More than 500 versions of her face decorate the walls and windows of the shop.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | January 22, 2008
Things got a lot more complicated for guys in the aftermath of the women's movement. After Simone de Beauvoir, Germaine Greer and Gloria Steinem got finished with us, it wasn't enough to be just the strong silent type, or the rebel without a cause, or the stern authority figure. Suddenly guys had to start exploring their feelings - something only women had to worry about previously. In The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, artist and gallery owner Jeffrey Kent offers his own jocular and highly personal take on the paradoxes, contradictions and inevitable screw-ups that arise when men try to figure out the emotional landscape.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | November 12, 2006
THE DA VINCI CODE -- Sony Pictures Home Entertainment -- $29.96 Ron Howard's too-faithful film version of The Da Vinci Code serves as an engrossing travelogue and an intriguing exercise in faux history and even faux-er theology. That it never proves as cunningly compelling as Dan Brown's giddy pleasure of a book is less the fault of the story than of Howard's unwillingness to take the necessary liberties to make it more cinematic. Tom Hanks, partnered with Howard for a third time (after Splash and Apollo 13)
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | April 20, 1997
Reggie didn't get it."Who cares about some guy who died nearly 500 years ago?" she groused in the museum lobby, one eye on the shopping mall across the street.That this particular "guy" happened to be Leonardo da Vinci, one of the most creative thinkers of all time, didn't make any difference. Nor was my 11-year-old daughter moved to learn that this massive (15,000-square-foot) Boston Museum of Science exhibit is the largest ever to explore da Vinci's brilliance as a scientist and inventor as well as an artist.
NEWS
By ALBANY TIMES UNION | February 16, 1998
BEACON, N.Y. - Artist Rod Skidmore commutes halfway to New York City every week to oversee what he believes will be the next Statue of Liberty.Here in this town on the banks of the Hudson River, the 64-year-old painter is coordinating the re-creation of a lost - and unfinished - Renaissance masterpiece: Leonardo da Vinci's 24-foot-tall horse, which was destroyed by French soldiers nearly 500 years ago.The aim of the volunteer group - known as Leonardo da...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 10, 2006
BEIJING --Chinese authorities ordered theaters nationwide to stop showing The Da Vinci Code yesterday after Chinese Catholics warned that the film could threaten social stability. The film, based on the best-selling novel by Dan Brown, has long been criticized as insulting to the Catholic Church but has already earned more at the box office than any other film shown in China this year, and it was seen within the local industry as a contender to overtake Titanic as the highest-grossing film here in history.
TRAVEL
By SUSAN SPANO and SUSAN SPANO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 2006
PARIS -- When The Da Vinci Code opens this weekend in the United States, one of the first places moviegoers will see is the Louvre, where the story starts. Director Ron Howard was allowed to film in the museum, so moviegoers will see the real thing: architect I.M. Pei's Pyramid, the 1,450-foot Grande Galerie and the Salle des Etats where Leonardo da Vinci's "Mona Lisa" hangs. Since the filming there last spring, the museum has distanced itself from the movie, reflecting the French art establishment's well-known scorn for popular culture and the Louvre's weariness with the phenomenon created by The Da Vinci Code, Dan Brown's controversial 2003 mystery about the supposed secret history of Christianity.
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