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NEWS
By Jerry Haar and Jeffrey Stark | November 1, 2002
MIAMI -- The administration of Brazilian President-elect Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva will be the most closely watched to date as a case of whether Latin American democracies can combat socioeconomic injustice and simultaneously pursue global competitiveness. Financial markets have accelerated downward ever since opinion polls reported that Mr. da Silva was pulling significantly ahead of the other candidates in Sunday's election. Investors, already wary that Brazil's growing debt burden could lead to a default similar to neighboring Argentina's, took no solace in Mr. da Silva's attacks on banks and currency market traders as perpetrators of "economic terrorism" and his promise to perform "major surgery" on South America's largest economy.
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SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Sun | October 27, 2007
In a better-late-than-never scenario, four Brazilian players have joined the Blast and should strengthen a roster hit hard by injuries last season. None will suit up tonight when the team plays the Milwaukee Wave in a Major Indoor Soccer League game, but they are finally participating in training sessions nearly a month after visa problems delayed their departure from Sao Paulo. If they make the roster, some or all in the group will be offered contracts. Three are midfielders - Bruno Felipe Da Silva, Hugo Da Silva and Lucio - and one, Raul Marcel, is a defender.
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NEWS
By Patrick McDonnell and Patrick McDonnell,Los Angeles Times | October 3, 2006
SAO PAULO, Brazil -- President President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva faces a tough runoff election later this month after his stunning fall from prohibitive favorite to co-survivor in Sunday's presidential contest. The charismatic da Silva, whose cries of "I was betrayed!" seemed to carry him relatively unscathed through sundry other corruption cases, could not overcome the dirty tricks scandal that broke two weeks before the election and left many Brazilians appalled. "The image of a shot in the foot is the blandest one that occurs to illustrate what Lula's campaign did to the candidate Lula - putting in high risk a re-election that was certain," the columnist Fernando de Barros e Silva wrote in yesterday's Folha de Sao Paulo newspaper.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 24, 2007
SAO PAULO, Brazil -- It was the president's brother on the line, asking for cash. "Hey, get me two grand," Genival Inacio da Silva demanded of an alleged gambling kingpin, according to transcripts of wiretaps published here this month. The telephone intercepts were part of a federal police operation known as Checkmate, which has led to the arrest of dozens of people in a slot-machine distribution scheme. Checkmate is just the latest in a chain of theatrically named scandals that have come to dominate Brazilian headlines and tarnish President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, sometimes called the Teflon president because of his aptitude in shaking off scandal.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 29, 2006
RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil -- Rebuked at the polls four weeks ago because of voter irritation with a corruption scandal and his unwillingness to answer questions about it, Brazil's president, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, heads into a runoff vote today with a lead that every poll suggests is insurmountable. A win would guarantee him another four years in office. A final round of public opinion surveys published Friday shows da Silva, a former factory worker and labor leader, defeating his opponent, Geraldo Alckmin of the Brazilian Social Democratic Party, at least 60 percent to 40 percent.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 29, 2002
SAO PAULO, Brazil - A day after being elected president of Latin America's largest democracy, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva sounded a conciliatory tone yesterday toward financial markets and asked Brazilians not to expect too much too soon. "As we said in the campaign, our government will honor contracts established by the government. We will not lose control of inflation and ... we will maintain ... a position of fiscal responsibility," said da Silva, the first Brazilian president to be elected from a leftist party.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2002
PHILADELPHIA -- For years, people have called Fabiola Da Silva one of the best female in-line skaters in the world. They're still doing it this week at the ESPN Summer X Games, but now they're taking gender out of the equation. She's simply one of the best in the world. Period. Da Silva will be competing against men in the aggressive in-line vert competition - where skaters perform tricks inside a halfpipe and are scored by judges - and she's certainly not doing it as a novelty act. She's got a shot at winning the thing.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 8, 2002
SAO PAULO, Brazil - After narrowly missing outright victory in presidential elections Sunday, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva of the leftist Workers Party predicted yesterday that he would triumph in the runoff Oct. 27 against Jose Serra, the government's candidate. "We are ready to win these elections," da Silva said. "The decision has merely been postponed. We will work hard to win votes and change the history of our country." With nearly all votes counted, da Silva, a former metalworker and union leader, polled 46.44 percent, comfortably ahead of Serra's 23.21 percent but short of the 50 percent needed to win outright.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 6, 2002
RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil - Even after all the speechmaking, campaigning, television advertising and debates, nearly a quarter of the electorate still has not made up its mind whom it wants as president. But today, Brazil's 115 million voters will finally have to decide whether they want to steer their country leftward in what everyone here recognizes as a watershed presidential election. From the start, the front-runner in the race has been Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva of the left-wing Workers' Party, who polls say is favored by 48 percent of voters.
TOPIC
By Francisco J. Moreno and Alejandro E. Moreno and Francisco J. Moreno and Alejandro E. Moreno,PACIFIC NEWS SERVICE | November 3, 2002
Headlines across the world shout about Brazil's new "leftist" president. But Luis Inacio Lula da Silva won a landslide victory in Latin America's largest economy by blurring traditional ideological boundaries and forming a broad-based, nationalist coalition of Brazilians ready to take on U.S. economic priorities and global financial institutions. Da Silva's success is a clear demonstration of the changing face of Latin American politics. The traditional struggle between conservatives, backed almost unanimously by business and financial leaders, against socialists or populists supported by the working class is giving way to a new conflict.
NEWS
April 1, 2007
MARYLAND A boon to watermen Maryland set up the Oyster Recovery Partnership more than a decade ago to revive the bay's dwindling oyster population, which had been ravaged by disease and overfishing. But the aim of the program has shifted to creating income for watermen instead of bringing back the oysters. pg 1a Schools target gang violence City school officials have drafted a safety plan to address the upswing in student gang violence. Interim city schools chief Charlene Cooper Boston has earmarked an extra $1 million for more police and $1.8 million for hall monitors in her budget, which was recently approved by the city school board.
NEWS
By Maura Reynolds and Maura Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | March 10, 2007
Sao Paulo, Brazil -- President Bush and Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva set aside past differences yesterday and announced a new partnership to promote the use of alternative fuels to reduce the Western Hemisphere's dependence on fossil fuels. Da Silva, whose left-of-center government has been critical of Bush on Iraq and the environment, suggested that the two countries can work pragmatically on issues of common interest even if they disagree in other areas. "After all, we ... who have polluted the world so much in the 20th century, need to make our contribution to de-polluting it in the 21st century," da Silva said after showing off a state-of-the-art fuel depot outside Sao Paulo.
NEWS
By Patrick J. McDonnell and Maura Reynolds and Patrick J. McDonnell and Maura Reynolds,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 9, 2007
Sao Paulo, Brazil -- As President Bush flew here on Air Force One yesterday, thousands of protesters shouting "Out Bush!" marched down this city's main drag, Avenida Paulista. "We don't want Bush here," shouted Marcelo Prado, 19, echoing a common sentiment. "Tell him to go home!" Bush was beginning the first leg of a five-country Latin American visit designed to bolster U.S. standing in the region and counter the growing influence of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez. The trip is the president's longest to date in Latin America, a region many Bush critics say has been largely ignored as the White House focused on Iraq and the Middle East.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 29, 2006
RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil -- Rebuked at the polls four weeks ago because of voter irritation with a corruption scandal and his unwillingness to answer questions about it, Brazil's president, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, heads into a runoff vote today with a lead that every poll suggests is insurmountable. A win would guarantee him another four years in office. A final round of public opinion surveys published Friday shows da Silva, a former factory worker and labor leader, defeating his opponent, Geraldo Alckmin of the Brazilian Social Democratic Party, at least 60 percent to 40 percent.
NEWS
By Patrick McDonnell and Patrick McDonnell,Los Angeles Times | October 3, 2006
SAO PAULO, Brazil -- President President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva faces a tough runoff election later this month after his stunning fall from prohibitive favorite to co-survivor in Sunday's presidential contest. The charismatic da Silva, whose cries of "I was betrayed!" seemed to carry him relatively unscathed through sundry other corruption cases, could not overcome the dirty tricks scandal that broke two weeks before the election and left many Brazilians appalled. "The image of a shot in the foot is the blandest one that occurs to illustrate what Lula's campaign did to the candidate Lula - putting in high risk a re-election that was certain," the columnist Fernando de Barros e Silva wrote in yesterday's Folha de Sao Paulo newspaper.
SPORTS
By Daniel Lyght and Daniel Lyght,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2004
DULLES, Va. - The coveted 900. Before May, only one man, the legendary Tony Hawk, had pulled it off on a skateboard in competition. That changed on Mother's Day at the Latin X Games, when Sandro Dias finally landed the trick. After six months of repeatedly trying to put the 900 down, Dias, the top-ranked vert skateboarder in the world, completed the 2 1/2 revolutions. He did it in his native Brazil, in front of his mother, other family members, friends and some of his most dedicated fans.
NEWS
November 1, 2002
THE ELECTION of Brazil's first working-class president in its history presents a new day for Latin America's most populous country, a challenge for the United States and a boost for the continent's democracies. Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, who won with a 61 percent majority in Sunday's election, left school in the fifth grade to work fulltime as an office boy. A former factory worker, he honed his political skills as a labor union leader, then as president of Brazil's leftist Workers Party.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 9, 2003
RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil - A senior official in the left-wing government that took power last week has set off a furor here and alarmed neighboring countries by arguing that Brazil, Latin America's largest nation, should acquire the capacity to produce a nuclear weapon. "Brazil is a country at peace, that has always preserved peace and is a defender of peace, but we need to be prepared, including technologically," Roberto Amaral, newly appointed minister of science and technology, said in an interview with the Brazilian service of the BBC broadcast Sunday night.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 14, 2004
RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil - Brazil intensified its campaign yesterday to be exempted from new American security measures that require most foreign visitors to be fingerprinted and photographed on arrival in the United States. The effort followed a personal appeal by President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva to President Bush at a meeting late Monday night. "If there are already 27 countries, then why not 28?" da Silva was reported by Brazilian officials to have said to Bush, referring to a group of mostly European nations whose citizens are largely exempt from the policy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 9, 2003
RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil - A senior official in the left-wing government that took power last week has set off a furor here and alarmed neighboring countries by arguing that Brazil, Latin America's largest nation, should acquire the capacity to produce a nuclear weapon. "Brazil is a country at peace, that has always preserved peace and is a defender of peace, but we need to be prepared, including technologically," Roberto Amaral, newly appointed minister of science and technology, said in an interview with the Brazilian service of the BBC broadcast Sunday night.
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