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March 8, 2007
March 8 1965 The United States landed its first combat troops in South Vietnam, about 3,500 Marines sent to defend the U.S. air base at Da Nang.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 28, 2012
HANOI, Vietnam -- It has been 50 years since President John F. Kennedy ordered U.S. "advisers" to South Vietnam to help battle the communist North and 37 years since the end of that divisive war and the country's unification under Communism. Today, Vietnam is fighting a war with itself. A local TV program reminds a visitor of Chinese propaganda "operas" circa 1970. Performers, some wearing military garb with a backdrop of missiles and an American B-52 bomber going down in flames, commemorate the 1972 Christmas bombing of Hanoi and Haiphong ordered by President Richard Nixon.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 28, 2012
HANOI, Vietnam -- It has been 50 years since President John F. Kennedy ordered U.S. "advisers" to South Vietnam to help battle the communist North and 37 years since the end of that divisive war and the country's unification under Communism. Today, Vietnam is fighting a war with itself. A local TV program reminds a visitor of Chinese propaganda "operas" circa 1970. Performers, some wearing military garb with a backdrop of missiles and an American B-52 bomber going down in flames, commemorate the 1972 Christmas bombing of Hanoi and Haiphong ordered by President Richard Nixon.
FEATURES
March 8, 2007
March 8 1965 The United States landed its first combat troops in South Vietnam, about 3,500 Marines sent to defend the U.S. air base at Da Nang.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | November 20, 1998
TERRY LACY'S last day in Vietnam was Aug. 11, 1968. He'd made friends -- and lost them -- at places called Khe Sanh and Da Nang. Tom Coores, a fellow Marine sergeant, had been killed; Lacy was the one who had to remove a map and compass from the body. Stan Abel also had been killed; he was a corporal and squad leader.And another chum, a corporal who went by "Ski," had had his left leg blown off; he'd given Lacy his engraved cigarette lighter a few hours before the North Vietnamese ambushed his squad.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 28, 1991
He has taken the long way home from Vietnam: For 23 years now -- through grueling pain, through 15 operations, through alcoholism, through suicidal despair, through profound physical diminution and emotional bitterness, through wrenching rejection from those whose country he served -- Lewis Puller Jr. has been trying to find his way back, trying to come home from the country where he lost half of his body and all of his life as he had lived it before the...
NEWS
September 22, 2005
Joseph Allen Hunter, a retired human resources specialist for Baltimore's public school system, died of cancer Saturday at Carroll Hospital Center. The Randallstown resident was 62. Born in Philadelphia, he earned a bachelor's degree in biology and a master's in business administration from what is now Morgan State University. In later years, he received a master's in public administration from the University of Baltimore. Mr. Hunter served in the Marine Corps as a captain during the Vietnam War and was stationed in Da Nang.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | November 30, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- As the Iraqi potential for major catastrophe grows and the most anti-military administration in American history wonders what, if anything, to do about it, a new book arrives and evokes memories of other bad times not so long ago. Some of these may be relevant today.First, a little background. In the fall of 1970, a year after Bill Clinton managed to evade the draft and the same year he was working in Washington for Project Pursestrings, a lobbying effort to cut off funds for the war in Vietnam, I was a young reporter newly arrived in Saigon.
FEATURES
By Bill DeYoung and Bill DeYoung,New York Times News Service | July 31, 1995
In Vietnam, John Scott Gantt was known as a Green Beret who could get things done.A captain with the 5th Special Forces, Mr. Gantt was 30 years old in 1968 when he devised a scheme to fly a pair of elephants cross-country to a remote mountain village. By helicopter.Mr. Gantt's animal adventure forms the basis of Disney's "Operation Dumbo Drop," which opened in theaters on Friday. Although the movie is based on a real event, the filmmakers took lots of liberties with the facts. "If you had to pick somebody that was me, it would be Danny Glover," says Mr. Gantt, who lives in Cross City, Fla.Mr.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | November 18, 1998
THIRTY YEARS ago, just before midnight, Cpl. John Wielebski, known to his comrades in the United States Marine Corps as "Ski," handed his cigarette lighter to a guy named Lacy, a supply sergeant who'd kept the boys in beans, bandages and bullets while they were encamped, first in the bloody hills of Khe Sanh, then at Da Nang. Lacy had stocks of almost everything but lighter fluid. He wanted a smoke. "Here, take mine," Wielebski said, handing off his stainless-steel Zippo on the way out of camp that night.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | November 20, 1998
TERRY LACY'S last day in Vietnam was Aug. 11, 1968. He'd made friends -- and lost them -- at places called Khe Sanh and Da Nang. Tom Coores, a fellow Marine sergeant, had been killed; Lacy was the one who had to remove a map and compass from the body. Stan Abel also had been killed; he was a corporal and squad leader.And another chum, a corporal who went by "Ski," had had his left leg blown off; he'd given Lacy his engraved cigarette lighter a few hours before the North Vietnamese ambushed his squad.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 2, 1996
DURHAM, N.C. -- As the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Sen. Jesse Helms leaves little doubt how he feels about the Communist leaders of Vietnam.Nine months after the Clinton administration formally recognized the Vietnamese government, Mr. Helms is still blocking financing for the newly opened American Embassy in Hanoi until the president certifies that there are no obstacles left in the search for possible American prisoners of war or those missing in action.In a speech last week he denounced Vietnam as one of Asia's "repressive governments," attacking its record on human rights.
NEWS
By Staff Report | July 16, 1993
Dr. Jean-Jacques Gunning, a retired Navy captain and an expert on infectious and tropical diseases and parasitology, died July 6 at his home in Pinehurst of complications after surgery.Dr. Gunning, who was 62, returned to Baltimore and practiced medicine after he retired in 1978 from the Navy Medical Corps. For nearly 10 years, he was senior vice president, medical director and director of medical education at St. Agnes Hospital.He was an associate professor at the University of Maryland medical school and had also taught at the University of California Los Angeles and Louisiana State University.
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