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By GREGORY KANE | February 21, 1996
Is Black History Month still needed? With characters like Dinesh D'Souza running around, you're danged skippy it is.D'Souza's parents emigrated to the United States from India when he was a teen-ager. He attended Dartmouth College, where he edited the conservative campus newspaper the Dartmouth Review. Then he graduated and now devotes himself to his true calling: writing tendentious books to pester and annoy Negroes.His latest work is "The End of Racism." But believe me, this guy -- and the folks at the American Enterprise Institute, where D'Souza is a fellow -- don't want to end racism as much as recycle it. They don't want a return to Jim Crow, per se. But they might settle for a system of James Crow, Esquire.
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NEWS
By Jacob Heilbrunn and Jacob Heilbrunn,OP-ED COMMENTARY | March 2, 2008
By common consent, William F. Buckley Jr., who died Wednesday, was the father of modern conservatism. But he also ended up as one of the Bush administration's most trenchant critics. His death not only represents the loss of one of America's leading intellectual figures but also underscores the extent of the collapse of the conservative movement that has so decisively shaped politics for decades. Like no other personality, Mr. Buckley pulled together the disparate strands of the conservative movement to endow it with panache, self-confidence and a sense of being on the cutting edge.
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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 27, 1998
SO, ANOTHER white boy snaps out.Kipland Kinkel, all of 15, has been charged in the shooting deaths of his parents and two schoolmates at Thurston High School in Springfield, Ore. He wounded 24 other students. Kinkel joins suspects in similar shootings in Jonesboro, Ark., West Paducah, Ky., and Pearl, Miss. All are young, white and male.You have to wonder what Dinesh D'Souza, author of that racist work of screed ironically entitled "The End of Racism," makes of all this. D'Souza went to great lengths in the book to promote the "black male as menace" theory.
NEWS
November 3, 2007
Reality's rules reveal no higher purpose I read Dinesh D'Souza's column "What atheists can't refute" (Opinion Commentary, Oct. 28) with interest. But I must take issue with some of its assumptions and conclusions. I do not believe in "god," as most people apparently mean the word. However, I suppose that I am not an "atheist" by the author's definition, either. I agree with Immanuel Kant that there is more to the world than our senses can apprehend, and more to what we apprehend than our minds can understand.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | December 25, 1990
LONDON -- Author Salman Rushdie embraced Islam yesterday and said that his book "The Satanic Verses" would not be published in paperback and that he did not personally agree with some statements in the book that most offend Moslems.Mr. Rushdie, 43, issued the statement in an attempt to get Iran and fundamentalist Moslems to lift the death sentence under which he has lived for 22 months. But fundamentalist British Moslem leaders said that it wasn't enough and that nothing short of withdrawal of the book from stores would remove the sentence pronounced by the late Iranian leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.
NEWS
By Joan Beck | November 5, 1995
CHICAGO -- Millions of well-meaning white Americans don't think of themselves as racist. They deplore racist jokes, racist comments, racist attitudes, racial inequality, racial discrimination and bigotry. They would genuinely welcome the color-blind society Martin Luther King dreamed of.They are perplexed and distressed by the rising anger about racism in recent years, about racial divides that seem to be widening and turning more hostile even as more minorities are succeeding. They are bewildered when they are told by blacks )
NEWS
By Clarence Page | March 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A public argument I recently had with author Dinesh D'Souza has left a lingering question in my mind.It started when a Washington bookstore invited me to stage a dialogue with the guest of my choice. I chose Mr. D'Souza, a young conservative with the American Enterprise Institute. He published a famous book last year that says racism is not a big deal anymore (''The End of Racism''). I just published a book that says it is (''Showing My Color'').I invited him to a ''showdown of ideas.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | July 9, 1991
THE retirement of Justice Thurgood Marshall and nomination of Clarence Thomas portend the virtual demise of affirmative action as a strategy to promote racial justice and economic uplift. Some would say good riddance."Affirmative action" began in 1961 when President Kennedy signed an executive order requiring government contractors to take affirmative steps to overcome patterns of discrimination. Settlements of cases of flagrant discrimination filed under the subsequent 1964 Civil Rights Act sometimes required employers to set minority hiring goals.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 26, 1999
JARED TAYLOR sat on the end seat of the four-guest panel for the taping of Kweisi Mfume's "The Bottom Line" television show. He identified himself as the "token white" taking part in a discussion about a recent Newsweek magazine cover story on the state of black America.Also on the panel was syndicated columnist Julianne Malveaux: gorgeous and a fierce debater and defender of liberal causes. Rounding out the in-studio guests were conservative Robert George and some Baltimore Sun columnist with an oversized forehead.
NEWS
By TRB | August 1, 1991
Washington. -- It does not strike me as terminally hypocritical for Clarence Thomas to have enjoyed the fruits of reverse discrimination at every stage in his career -- including his nomination for the Supreme Court -- while claiming to be morally opposed. Unless you are Ghandi, you live in society as you find it while working for change. I oppose the home mortgage-interest deduction, but I still take it every year.What nicely complicates the anti-affirmative-action position, though, is the evident reasonableness of giving someone like Clarence Thomas a leg up in the game of life.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 26, 1999
JARED TAYLOR sat on the end seat of the four-guest panel for the taping of Kweisi Mfume's "The Bottom Line" television show. He identified himself as the "token white" taking part in a discussion about a recent Newsweek magazine cover story on the state of black America.Also on the panel was syndicated columnist Julianne Malveaux: gorgeous and a fierce debater and defender of liberal causes. Rounding out the in-studio guests were conservative Robert George and some Baltimore Sun columnist with an oversized forehead.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 27, 1998
SO, ANOTHER white boy snaps out.Kipland Kinkel, all of 15, has been charged in the shooting deaths of his parents and two schoolmates at Thurston High School in Springfield, Ore. He wounded 24 other students. Kinkel joins suspects in similar shootings in Jonesboro, Ark., West Paducah, Ky., and Pearl, Miss. All are young, white and male.You have to wonder what Dinesh D'Souza, author of that racist work of screed ironically entitled "The End of Racism," makes of all this. D'Souza went to great lengths in the book to promote the "black male as menace" theory.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | March 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A public argument I recently had with author Dinesh D'Souza has left a lingering question in my mind.It started when a Washington bookstore invited me to stage a dialogue with the guest of my choice. I chose Mr. D'Souza, a young conservative with the American Enterprise Institute. He published a famous book last year that says racism is not a big deal anymore (''The End of Racism''). I just published a book that says it is (''Showing My Color'').I invited him to a ''showdown of ideas.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | February 28, 1996
Black History Month officially ends tomorrow, but if you should happen upon a thick, 8 by 9 1/2 -inch book with a red cover as you cruise mall bookstores this weekend, pick it up anyway. The history buff within you will be forever grateful."Black Saga: The African-American Experience," written by University of Maryland College Park geography professor Charles M. Christian, is arguably the most comprehensive history book about African-Americans to date. Christian begins by giving a brief history of the western Sudan before 1492, tells of blacks who accompanied European explorers on their journeys to this hemisphere and then proceeds chronologically from there.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | February 21, 1996
Is Black History Month still needed? With characters like Dinesh D'Souza running around, you're danged skippy it is.D'Souza's parents emigrated to the United States from India when he was a teen-ager. He attended Dartmouth College, where he edited the conservative campus newspaper the Dartmouth Review. Then he graduated and now devotes himself to his true calling: writing tendentious books to pester and annoy Negroes.His latest work is "The End of Racism." But believe me, this guy -- and the folks at the American Enterprise Institute, where D'Souza is a fellow -- don't want to end racism as much as recycle it. They don't want a return to Jim Crow, per se. But they might settle for a system of James Crow, Esquire.
NEWS
By Joan Beck | November 5, 1995
CHICAGO -- Millions of well-meaning white Americans don't think of themselves as racist. They deplore racist jokes, racist comments, racist attitudes, racial inequality, racial discrimination and bigotry. They would genuinely welcome the color-blind society Martin Luther King dreamed of.They are perplexed and distressed by the rising anger about racism in recent years, about racial divides that seem to be widening and turning more hostile even as more minorities are succeeding. They are bewildered when they are told by blacks )
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | February 28, 1996
Black History Month officially ends tomorrow, but if you should happen upon a thick, 8 by 9 1/2 -inch book with a red cover as you cruise mall bookstores this weekend, pick it up anyway. The history buff within you will be forever grateful."Black Saga: The African-American Experience," written by University of Maryland College Park geography professor Charles M. Christian, is arguably the most comprehensive history book about African-Americans to date. Christian begins by giving a brief history of the western Sudan before 1492, tells of blacks who accompanied European explorers on their journeys to this hemisphere and then proceeds chronologically from there.
NEWS
April 26, 1991
Tree CheersEditor: In celebration of Earth Day we were urged to planttrees. From an environmental perspective there seems to be a conflict.In order to grow tall and strong a tree needs the carbon from carbon dioxide and the oxides of nitrogen for nourishment. Carbon dioxide is pictured as being responsible for the greenhouse effect, while the oxides of nitrogen add to acid rain. Both effects, we are told, are harmful to trees.However, the real reasons we plant trees make sense. Trees prevent soil erosion, feed the hungry, shelter us and provide shade.
NEWS
By TRB | August 1, 1991
Washington. -- It does not strike me as terminally hypocritical for Clarence Thomas to have enjoyed the fruits of reverse discrimination at every stage in his career -- including his nomination for the Supreme Court -- while claiming to be morally opposed. Unless you are Ghandi, you live in society as you find it while working for change. I oppose the home mortgage-interest deduction, but I still take it every year.What nicely complicates the anti-affirmative-action position, though, is the evident reasonableness of giving someone like Clarence Thomas a leg up in the game of life.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | July 9, 1991
THE retirement of Justice Thurgood Marshall and nomination of Clarence Thomas portend the virtual demise of affirmative action as a strategy to promote racial justice and economic uplift. Some would say good riddance."Affirmative action" began in 1961 when President Kennedy signed an executive order requiring government contractors to take affirmative steps to overcome patterns of discrimination. Settlements of cases of flagrant discrimination filed under the subsequent 1964 Civil Rights Act sometimes required employers to set minority hiring goals.
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