Advertisement
HomeCollectionsD Day
IN THE NEWS

D Day

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
Harry F. Hansen Sr., a highly decorated World War II veteran who landed in the initial wave of troops on Omaha Beach on D-Day and later became a Baltimore businessman, died on Memorial Day from complications of a stroke at Howard County General Hospital. The longtime Ellicott City resident was 96. The son of a butcher and a homemaker, Harry Frederick Hansen was born in Baltimore and raised on Ashton Street in Southwest Baltimore. After graduating from City College in 1935, he worked as a butcher with his father and as a jewelry salesman, before his marriage in 1939 to Edith Mae Stephens.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
Franklin W. Littleton Jr., a retired career Air Force officer and a businessman who was a big-band and Dixieland music aficionado, died April 20 of complications from dementia at Nichols Eldercare, an Edgewood assisted-living facility. The Bel Air resident was 91. The son of a contractor and a homemaker, Franklin Walter Littleton Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised on Clearspring Road in Forest Park. He was a 1939 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and studied law at the University of Baltimore at night while working at Montgomery Ward and the Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
Charles H. "Harry" Heinlein, a young Army machine-gunner who survived the D-Day landing on Omaha Beach on June 6, 1944, and returned 60 years later, died Saturday of pneumonia at Stella Maris Hospice. The longtime Violetville resident was 90. Mr. Heinlein was a 22-year-old private from Baltimore attached to the famed 29th Division when he landed on Omaha Beach at 7:40 a.m. June 6, 1944, as part of what Supreme Allied Commander Dwight D. Eisenhower called the "Great Crusade" that would eventually liberate Europe's millions from the domination of Adolf Hitler.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
James F. Barlow, a retired masonry contractor who drove a weapon carrier at Omaha Beach during the World War II Allied invasion, died Sept. 1 at St. Agnes Medical Center after suffering a fractured hip at his Academy Heights home. He was 87. Mr. Barlow was co-grand marshal of this year's Catonsville July 4th parade and was the commander of two veterans posts. He also led the parade in 1994 for the 50th anniversary of D-Day. Born in Baltimore and raised near Union Square, he attended 14 Holy Martyrs School and was a 1942 graduate of St. Martin's High School, where he was the center on the school's basketball team.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2012
George Francis Kerchner, a highly decorated Army Ranger who on D-Day successfully led an attack on enemy gun positions that earned him the Distinguished Service Cross, died Friday at his home in Midlothian, Va., of complications from a fall. He was 93. The son of a drug company manager and a homemaker, he was born in Baltimore and raised on North Lyndhurst Avenue. He attended Polytechnic Institute until the 11th grade, when he left school to help support his family. He worked as a soda jerk for Arundel Ice Cream Co., which had been established by an uncle, and later as a security guard for the Pennsylvania Railroad.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2011
Stanley A. "Jimmy" Makowski, founder of National Press of Baltimore and a decorated World War II veteran, died June 21 of heart failure at his Perry Hall home. He was 93. Mr. Makowski, one of eight children, was born and raised in Canton. He was a graduate of Polytechnic Institute. Drafted in 1941, he was assigned to the 28th Infantry Division and landed at Normandy on June 6, 1944. After being wounded in the legs during the D-Day invasion, he was reassigned to division headquarters, where he was a supply clerk, and later an electrical technician in charge of a power plant and a demolition expert, said a son, Stephen Makowski of Perry Hall.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 13, 2011
John Polyniak, a World War II veteran who landed on Omaha Beach on D-Day and later was severely wounded during the battle for St. Lo, died June 7 of heart failure at the Encore at Turf Valley assisted-living facility in Ellicott City. Mr. Polyniak's death at 92 came 67 years and a day after he stormed ashore in France with his comrades of Company C, 116th Infantry, of the 29th Division, in the first frenetic predawn moments of the D-Day invasion. "This was a big day in my life," he wrote in an unpublished account of the invasion.
EXPLORE
By rick@ricksteves.com | June 9, 2011
This June marks the 67th anniversary of D-Day, the Allied invasion of Normandy, and the beginning of the end of World War II. The last great D-Day commemorations were held two years ago, as there likely won't be many veterans alive for the 70th. But Normandy's inhabitants haven't forgotten what the British, Canadian and American troops and their families sacrificed all those years ago. When I was on the small main square of a town in Normandy, an elderly Frenchman approached me and sang a few bars of "The Star-Spangled Banner.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | April 3, 2011
Pimlico Race Course D Day has a winning day at $50K Shine Again Stakes Samuel F. Cronk 's D Day ran by the pace-setters and drew away to a handy score in the opening weekend feature Saturday at Pimlico Race Course , the $50,000 Shine Again Stakes for fillies and mares. Craftily ridden by Jeremy Rose , the 6-year-old launched her bid around the far turn in the 1/16-mile test, coming off the rail to swing widest into the stretch before blowing past speedsters Lily Quatorze and Trez to win in hand by 43/4 lengths.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.