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D Day

SPORTS
By Sports Digest | April 3, 2011
Pimlico Race Course D Day has a winning day at $50K Shine Again Stakes Samuel F. Cronk 's D Day ran by the pace-setters and drew away to a handy score in the opening weekend feature Saturday at Pimlico Race Course , the $50,000 Shine Again Stakes for fillies and mares. Craftily ridden by Jeremy Rose , the 6-year-old launched her bid around the far turn in the 1/16-mile test, coming off the rail to swing widest into the stretch before blowing past speedsters Lily Quatorze and Trez to win in hand by 43/4 lengths.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2011
Marvin A. Geyer, a retired U.S. Department of Agriculture meat inspector who landed on Omaha Beach with the 29th Division on D-Day, died Sunday of heart failure at his Arbutus home. He was 91. Mr. Geyer was born in Baltimore and raised in Morrell Park. After graduation in 1937 from City College, he went to work at the Esskay meatpacking plant in East Baltimore. An accident at the plant severely burned his feet. While cleaning out a tank car transporting lard that had to be heated to be removed, Mr. Geyer jumped down into the car to force out the lard that had settled on the bottom.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2010
Thomas Frederick Rommel Sr., a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. foreman and World War II veteran, died Dec. 14 of Alzheimer's disease at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury. The former longtime Hamilton resident was 87. Mr. Rommel was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. He was a 1941 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. During World War II, he enlisted in the Navy and served aboard ships as a radar man. He served in the Atlantic Theater and participated in the D-Day invasion.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen , fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 3, 2009
Joseph Lloyd Alsop, who was stationed aboard a Navy minesweeper during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and later participated in the D-Day landing in Normandy, died Nov. 23 of respiratory failure at St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Towson resident was 88. Mr. Alsop was born and raised in Fredericksburg, Va., and after high school enlisted in the Navy in 1939. On Dec. 6, 1941, Mr. Alsop's ship, the USS Boggs, an old three-stack World War I-era destroyer that had been converted to a high-speed minesweeper, was steaming into Pearl Harbor after a week at sea towing targets for gunnery practice.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 3, 2009
J oseph Lloyd Alsop, who was stationed aboard a Navy minesweeper during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and later participated in the D-Day landing in Normandy, died Nov. 23 of respiratory failure at St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Towson resident was 88. Mr. Alsop was born and raised in Fredericksburg, Va., and after high school enlisted in the Navy in 1939. On Dec. 6, 1941, Mr. Alsop's ship, the USS Boggs, an old three-stack World War I-era destroyer that had been converted to a high-speed minesweeper, was steaming into Pearl Harbor after a week at sea towing targets for gunnery practice.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 10, 2009
James Daniel Nolan, a retired lawyer and former president of Blue Shield of Maryland who landed at Normandy with the 1st Infantry Division on D-Day, died Wednesday of cancer at Mercy Ridge in Timonium. He was 86. Mr. Nolan, the son of Irish immigrant parents, was born in Baltimore and raised on McKean Avenue and later in Howard Park. "His father was a streetcar motorman for United Railways and Electric Company, and his mother was a housekeeper," said a son, Stephen J. Nolan, a Towson lawyer and a Timonium resident.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | July 7, 2009
Andrew L. "Shad" Crockett, a retired postmaster and a highly decorated World War II infantryman who landed at Normandy on D-Day with the 29th Division, died Wednesday of heart failure at the Edward W. McGready Memorial Hospital in Crisfield. He was 85. Mr. Crockett was born on Tangier Island, the son of a waterman and a homemaker. After graduating from Crisfield High School, he moved to Baltimore and went to work in the Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Fairfield yard building Liberty ships. In 1943, he enlisted in the Army and was sent to England aboard the RMS Queen Mary, where he joined the 115th Regiment of the Army's 29th Division.
TRAVEL
By Kayla Cross and Katherine McNaboe | June 7, 2009
Even in 1671, pioneers were astounded by the blue mountains and vast valley in southwestern Virginia. Now the Roanoke Valley, less than a five-hour drive from Baltimore, is a place for visitors to explore the natural beauty of the Blue Ridge Mountains and discover both the historical and modern features of Roanoke. Here are five things to see and do: 1 Tour the Taubman. This museum is a work of art - inside and out - and displays early American art, exquisite handbags and contemporary photography.
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