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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
When 160,000 American, British, and Canadian soldiers flung themselves at Hitler's Fortress Europe on this day seventy years ago, it was the first step on a long march.  They marched through Normandy and Brittany, through Lorraine, across the Rhine into Germany, until Grand Admiral Karl Doenitz and Colonel General Alfred Jodl signed the articles of capitulation at Reims. It had been a little less than a year.  It is possible to follow that march, in articles lifted from the archives of The Sun  and The Evening Sun , recently published in Written Under Fire: Baltimore Sun Correspondents' Dispatches From Normandy to the German Surrender .  The Evening Sun 's Holbrook Bradley was with the 29th Division on the beach at Normandy.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Don Casey has attended every annual reunion of the 238th Combat Engineer Battalion since the first in 1947. He shares stories of the battalion's battles in World War II, including its part in D-Day, the airborne and beach assault on Normandy, France, 70 years ago. The 238th is staging its annual reunion this weekend in Columbia, and while he was in town, Casey was interviewed by students from Howard Community College on Thursday as part of a...
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NEWS
June 6, 2014
Seventy years ago, thousands of America's young and courageous men were landing on the shores of Normandy, France. The names of "Omaha," "Utah" and other beaches became emblazoned in American history. On that June 6 morning, my first memory of history came alive as my parents and I heard the radio voice of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. "Our sons, pride of our nation, today have landed on the shores of France," President Roosevelt announced. "Some may return, some may never return.
NEWS
By Javier Miyares | June 22, 2014
Seventy years ago today, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a bill that transformed the economic and social structure of the United States and paved the way for the post-war boom. It was called the GI Bill of Rights. One of its many unintended byproducts was the way it revolutionized higher education. Just 16 days after D-Day, as American troops began the torturous battle to retake Hitler's Europe, President Roosevelt said in his signing statement that the bill "gives emphatic notice to the men and women in our armed forces that the American people do not intend to let them down.
NEWS
November 6, 1990
It is Decision Day. Starting at 7 o'clock this morning, voters get to decide the fate of dozens of political races and issues that will affect their daily lives. Only on election day do citizens have such power in their hands.Don't squander this chance to make a difference. Whatever your daily schedule, find the time to go to the polls and participate in this great democratic process. Your vote truly could determine who governs your county, writes your laws and runs your state over the next four years.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
James F. Barlow, a retired masonry contractor who drove a weapon carrier at Omaha Beach during the World War II Allied invasion, died Sept. 1 at St. Agnes Medical Center after suffering a fractured hip at his Academy Heights home. He was 87. Mr. Barlow was co-grand marshal of this year's Catonsville July 4th parade and was the commander of two veterans posts. He also led the parade in 1994 for the 50th anniversary of D-Day. Born in Baltimore and raised near Union Square, he attended 14 Holy Martyrs School and was a 1942 graduate of St. Martin's High School, where he was the center on the school's basketball team.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
Leonard T. Schroeder Jr. was a North Linthicum native and a graduate of Glen Burnie High School, but 70 years ago he carved out a moment in history for himself when, on the morning of the Allied invasion of Normandy, he was credited with being the first American to step ashore in France. In the days following the invasion that marked the beginning of the end of the war in Europe, Schroeder was cited in newspaper clippings as likely being the first American soldier to reach Europe in the amphibious invasion.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 7, 2014
Given the numerous studies revealing how American education lags behind instruction in other countries in disciplines once thought to be essential, it should come as no surprise that on the 70th anniversary of D-Day, a lot of people are clueless about central elements of the Allied invasion of the European continent on June 6, 1944. The American Council of Trustees and Alumni  (ACTA) has released the results of a survey, which finds only slightly more than half (54 percent)
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | June 11, 2004
WASHINGTON - There's been some good political news out of Iraq in recent days. The newly installed - and now U.N.-blessed - Iraqi government is made up of some really decent people. There is hope. But it will not be realized if the sort of incident that happened last weekend keeps being repeated. Two American and two Polish employees of Blackwater USA, a security contractor, were killed in an ambush on the main road from Baghdad airport to downtown. Remember a year ago when Saddam Hussein's spokesman, the wacky "Baghdad Bob," claimed that U.S. forces didn't control the airport?
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 4, 1997
The 29th Division Association of the Maryland National Guard will conduct a memorial service Friday to commemorate the D-Day landings of June 6, 1944, and a crab feast from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Normandy Room, 3919 E. Lombard St., Baltimore.Information is available from association historian Bernard Nowakowski, 410-276-0426.Pub Date: 6/04/97
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 7, 2014
Given the numerous studies revealing how American education lags behind instruction in other countries in disciplines once thought to be essential, it should come as no surprise that on the 70th anniversary of D-Day, a lot of people are clueless about central elements of the Allied invasion of the European continent on June 6, 1944. The American Council of Trustees and Alumni  (ACTA) has released the results of a survey, which finds only slightly more than half (54 percent)
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
When 160,000 American, British, and Canadian soldiers flung themselves at Hitler's Fortress Europe on this day seventy years ago, it was the first step on a long march.  They marched through Normandy and Brittany, through Lorraine, across the Rhine into Germany, until Grand Admiral Karl Doenitz and Colonel General Alfred Jodl signed the articles of capitulation at Reims. It had been a little less than a year.  It is possible to follow that march, in articles lifted from the archives of The Sun  and The Evening Sun , recently published in Written Under Fire: Baltimore Sun Correspondents' Dispatches From Normandy to the German Surrender .  The Evening Sun 's Holbrook Bradley was with the 29th Division on the beach at Normandy.
NEWS
June 6, 2014
Seventy years ago, thousands of America's young and courageous men were landing on the shores of Normandy, France. The names of "Omaha," "Utah" and other beaches became emblazoned in American history. On that June 6 morning, my first memory of history came alive as my parents and I heard the radio voice of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. "Our sons, pride of our nation, today have landed on the shores of France," President Roosevelt announced. "Some may return, some may never return.
NEWS
June 5, 2014
Today is the 70 t h anniversary of D-Day, the massive invasion of Normandy that cost the lives of 9,000 Allied soldiers. It is a day not only for recalling the heroic efforts of those who stormed the beaches that day but of the World War II generation generally and, by extension, all who have served the United States in uniform during times of war. The tributes to these brave soldiers will flow effortlessly off the tongues of politicians....
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
Seventy years ago this morning, Bill Swanner crawled through hell. It was still dark when the 19-year-old infantryman joined the more than 150,000 Allied soldiers making the secretive passage out of England for Normandy. Dawn was breaking when he dropped into the water short of Omaha Beach. Now he was on the sand, in the smoke, crawling past the mines and through the corpses, a 50-pound water-cooled machine gun in his hands, pushing through withering German fire to get to the hedgerows beyond the beach.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
An Ellicott City resident has spent this past week in Normandy, taking an unique perspective on the 70th anniversary of the D-Day invasion during World War II. Scott Gray, 48, a member of the Maryland-based Round Canopy Parachute Team, is taking part in commemorative parachute jumps over Normandy and other locations in France to commemorate the events that led to the end of Nazi occupation of France. "What we do [is] a humble act of remembrance that takes very little courage compared to the bravery of those heroic lads during the invasion of Normandy," Gray said in an email from France.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1994
When veterans of the Maryland-Virginia 29th Division stand on Normandy's Omaha Beach in a few weeks remembering their landing there on June 6, 1944, D-day, a tangible piece of the division legend may be on hand -- their commanding general's jeep.From Omaha Beach to the link-up with the Russian Army at the Elbe River in 1945, Maj. Gen. Charles H. Gerhardt, the 29th's Pattonesque commander, traveled in the jeep, which he called "Vixen Tor" for a hill near the division's training area at Tavistock in southwestern England.
TRAVEL
October 14, 2001
On Dec. 7, 2001, 60 years after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the year-old National D-Day Museum in New Orleans will open its first major expansion. The addition, called the "D-Day Invasions in the Pacific," is a 5,000-square-foot gallery of photos, videos, artifacts, maps and stories about the fighting in and along the Pacific, including Pearl Harbor, so recently called back into our memories. Three days of events will mark the opening, including a parade led by veterans of the Pacific campaign.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
Leonard T. Schroeder Jr. was a North Linthicum native and a graduate of Glen Burnie High School, but 70 years ago he carved out a moment in history for himself when, on the morning of the Allied invasion of Normandy, he was credited with being the first American to step ashore in France. In the days following the invasion that marked the beginning of the end of the war in Europe, Schroeder was cited in newspaper clippings as likely being the first American soldier to reach Europe in the amphibious invasion.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2013
John G. "Jack" Cuthbert, a decorated World War II veteran who stormed the beaches of Normandy on D-Day, died July 5 from a heart attack at his Rodgers Forge home. He was 93. John Graham Cuthbert Sr. was born in Baltimore and raised on Barrington Road in Forest Park. After attending Calvert Hall College High School, he went to work as a salesman at Dafoe Motors, which was owned by his father. He enlisted in the Army in 1941, and served with the Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, of the 29th Division's 175th Infantry Regiment.
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