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By New York Times News Service | June 17, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Almost every day for weeks, New York Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato has risen on the Senate floor to deride Hillary Rodham Clinton's profits in commodity trades and to exhort his colleagues to approve hearings to examine the investments.Now it turns out that Mr. D'Amato has also made a remarkable profit in a speculative foray.Mr. D'Amato, the leading Senate critic of the Clintons' finances, made $37,125 in a single day last June in an initial public sale of stock in asmall California company called Computer Marketplace.
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NEWS
By BENJAMIN WEISSMAN | July 23, 2006
Atlas From the Streets to the Ring: A Son's Struggle to Become a Man Teddy Atlas and Peter Alson Ecco / 278 pages / $24.95 For many a fight fan, Teddy Atlas is a monarch of strategy and technique. He is not just one of the most knowledgeable men alive on the subject of boxing, he may be the single best sports commentator, period. Atlas, a longtime trainer who covers boxing for ESPN, is remarkably articulate, succinct, honest (in a sport more corrupt than American politics), respectful and humble.
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NEWS
By PETER H. STONE | June 11, 1995
When Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, Republican of Kansas, convened Washington lobbyists late last year to meet Alfonse M. D'Amato, the new chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, he joked that Mr. D'Amato was the only senator who, when raising funds, "doesn't take yes for an answer."Laughter filled the packed room at the NRSC's offices, though for many in the audience it was an old story. In a decade and a half in Washington, the New York Republican once known as "Senator Pothole" has earned a reputation as a prodigious fund-raiser for whom nothing succeeds like excess.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2004
WITH JUST days before the Jan. 14 start of the General Assembly session, politicians are vacuuming up their last dollars before an annual 90-day ban on fund raising kicks in. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., in particular, has a busy couple of weeks on the steak-skewers and chardonnay circuit, helping several party-mates bolster their campaign accounts. Tonight, Ehrlich is scheduled to appear as a guest at a fund-raiser in Frederick for Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett, his former congressional colleague.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 18, 1994
WASHINGTON -- At a recent luncheon meeting of the 44 Republican senators, Bob Dole, the Senate minority leader, presented Alfonse M. D'Amato with a bottle of Whitewater cologne.Mr. Dole's gag gift prompted hearty applause and cheers. The brash and combative senator from New York has helped escalate the complex business of the Clintons' involvement with the failed Whitewater land deal into an issue with potentially disastrous implications for the Democrats.Mr. D'Amato's high-pitched reminders on the Senate floor, day after day, have kept the issue alive.
NEWS
By IAN JOHNSON | October 25, 1992
New York-- There may be some issues separating Boring Bob and Senator Pothole, but they lie dormant under the heavy layer of mud and anger that has settled over this bizarre campaign for U.S. Senate.It has become a race that makes the national contest, with its truth-fudging and character assassination, seem like a contest between Honest Abe and the Good Humor Ice Cream man. In New York, names are being called and charges trumped up that could make one forget that the race is between two fundamentally different candidates.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 4, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Signaling his intention to move aggressively in reopening the Senate's Whitewater investigation, the prospective chairman of the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee said yesterday he plans to hold hearings on the issue as soon as late January or early February.Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato, R-N.Y., who as chairman of the banking panel would be the Senate's chief Whitewater investigator, said he is inclined to create a special subcommittee -- which he would chair -- to handle the Whitewater probe.
NEWS
May 8, 1996
WHAT MUST be infuriating to the latest targets of Alfonse D'Amato, otherwise known as "Senator Potshot," is that he is politically on target. Of fellow Republicans like Pat Buchanan, who are staunchly anti-abortion, Mr. D'Amato asks why such "philosophical ayatollahs" think they can dictate to the GOP. Of House conservatives, particularly Speaker Newt Gingrich, he said their "harsh rhetoric" created an impression Republicans are a "party without compassion."If...
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and William F. Zorzi Jr. and Thomas W. Waldron and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1998
Among the Marylanders sending checks to U.S. Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato of New York near the end of this year's campaign was one of the state's most loyal and generous Democratic backers -- Baltimore Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos.Angelos said his October contribution of $25,000 to a political action committee controlled by D'Amato was not connected to an effort by the Maryland racing industry and others here to help D'Amato in exchange for his assistance raising money for Republican gubernatorial candidate Ellen R. Sauerbrey.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 7, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato of New York, who has led Republican attacks on alleged ethical breaches by President and Hillary Rodham Clinton in the Whitewater case, has come under criticism himself in a government report that says he reaped one-day profits of $37,125 in a stock deal.D'Amato, chairman of a special Senate committee investigating Whitewater for the past year, was criticized in a confidential report commissioned by the Securities & Exchange Commission that was made public by U.S. District Judge Joyce Hens Green.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | June 4, 2003
C. Richard D'Amato says he has a personal stake in the rule changes approved Monday by the Federal Communications Commission allowing further consolidation of the media world. Last fall, as he ran for re-election to the House of Delegates from Annapolis, D'Amato found himself under tough scrutiny. WBFF-TV contended D'Amato had misrepresented the recognitions he received for his service in the U.S. Navy and as a naval reservist. For instance, D'Amato had cited receiving three "Bronze Stars" on his campaign literature - the name for a medal for combat valor - when he had received far less prestigious bronze stars to place on ribbons given for deployment to combat areas.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2002
Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens declared victory over Republican challenger Phillip D. Bissett last night after an all-day count of about 6,000 absentee ballots by election officials. "I am thrilled that the campaign is over, and that the voters of this county have reaffirmed my leadership for four more years," Owens said. She added that she would continue to focus on education, land preservation, public safety and economic development. According to an unofficial count released about 9:30 last night by the county Board of Elections, Owens received 89,290 votes to Bissett's 83,115 - about 52 percent to 48 percent.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2000
Crab pickers and watermen appealed to legislators yesterday to protect them from foreign crab meat products being sold under names such as "Maryland-style" and "Chesapeake Bay." Representatives of the two industries urged a House of Delegates committee to approve legislation that would force seafood processors such as Baltimore's Phillips Foods Inc. to use labeling that tells consumers the country of origin of the crab meat and crab meat products they use. The legislation, introduced by Annapolis Del. C. Richard D'Amato, a Democrat, comes in response to a precipitous decline in the market share of domestic crab meat under pressure from imports -- mostly from Asia.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 22, 1999
With bone-crunching, ear-pounding intensity, Oliver Stone brings the world of professional football to the screen in "Any Given Sunday," a kinetically charged gridiron drama that is enormous fun to watch through most of its nearly three-hour running time.Indeed, as long as Stone and his prodigious cast and crew stay on the field, "Any Given Sunday" is as good as movies get for generating you-are-there heat and adrenal energy. If the film's off-field drama flags a bit under windy speeches and some questionable casting, it still offers some of the most exhilarating cinema to be seen on screen in an otherwise turgid season.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1999
In the midst of Maryland's worst drought in 70 years, Del. C. Richard D'Amato is probably one of the few people worried about floods.But D'Amato, who took the lead last spring in pushing the state and county to clean up debris carried downstream by Susquehanna River flooding to local beaches, is continuing in the dry season to push for federal help tackling the recurrent problem."
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1999
In the midst of Maryland's worst drought in 70 years, State Del. C. Richard D'Amato is probably one of the few people worried about floods.But D'Amato, who took the lead last spring in pushing the state and county to clean up debris carried downstream by Susquehanna River flooding to local beaches, is continuing in the dry season to push for federal help tackling the recurrent problem."
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and William F. Zorzi Jr. and Thomas W. Waldron and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF Sun researcher Genice Owens contributed to this article | December 22, 1998
In the closing weeks of this year's race for governor, supporters of Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey found an unlikely way to give her financial assistance: They sent $1,000 checks to Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato, a New York Republican.At the same time, dozens of D'Amato's backers from New York and elsewhere returned the favor by making contributions of up to $8,000 apiece to Sauerbrey.The Maryland-New York connection was a behind-the-scenes agreement between the two campaigns to tap into each other's financial bases.
NEWS
August 11, 1998
VOTERS IN Legislative District 27B have only one contested primary: Incumbent Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller is being challenged by Juanita Miller. Mr. Miller, a member of the General Assembly since 1971, deserves the Democratic nomination.Primary voters in adjacent District 30 don't have a contested race in the primaries for Senate, but they have plenty of candidates from which to choose for three House of Delegates seats.Democratic voters will select three of six candidates. Among them are incumbents Michael E. Busch and Virginia P. Clagett.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1999
It's getting to be an unwelcome sign of spring in the communities in Maryland's upper Chesapeake Bay region -- the clotting of beaches and waterways with logs, tree stumps, tires, plastic foam junk and occasional needles.The floating debris, washed in from as far away as Cooperstown, N.Y., is released into bay-bound waterways during winter months when floodgates are opened on dams along the Susquehanna River to reduce dangerously high water levels.The price of averting flooding is the accumulated garbage of northeastern states landing hundreds of miles away on the shores of the bay and on local beaches.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1999
A new state delegate who ridiculed an opponent in November for his poor attendance record missed the first two votes of his political career yesterday, saying he "just lost track of time" while talking on the telephone.Del. Richard D'Amato, a Democrat from Annapolis who was one of three District 30 candidates who defeated incumbent Republican Phillip D. Bissett, hustled up the stairs of the State House minutes after the first two votes of the session at 11: 51 a.m. and 11: 52 a.m."I just wasn't focused," said D'Amato, 56, an attorney who was chief counsel for U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia for more than a decade.
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