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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2001
Manchester has hired a police chief who will begin duty next month, according to Mayor Christopher B. D'Amario. After interviewing several candidates, the mayor recommended Charles Lewis, 46, who lives near Easton in Talbot County and is a deputy sheriff there. Lewis' 16-year career in law enforcement has included service as police chief in the town of Ridgely in Caroline County from 1998 to1999, 6 1/2 years as a town officer in St. Michaels, where he was a sergeant, and 2 1/2 as a detective for the Wicomico County sheriff.
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NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | May 16, 2007
Manchester Mayor Christopher B. D'Amario turned back a challenge by the town's former wastewater supervisor in yesterday's municipal elections, but one of two council members on the ballot lost his job to a relative newcomer. David Richardson, 31, the general manager of a horse farm who moved to Manchester from Glyndon three years ago, ousted Joseph Jordan from the five-member Town Council. Incumbent Ryan M. Warner, 32, an accountant, easily won his third term as the highest vote-getter in a field of five candidates.
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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2001
Timothy G. Timmons, Manchester's police chief, has resigned for family reasons after rising through the ranks of the four-man department to become its chief in 1997. Manchester Mayor Christopher D'Amario said Tuesday the search for a police chief for the town of 3,200 has started. "I am, as aggressively as I can, pursuing a new police chief," said D'Amario, a civilian employee of the Baltimore County Police Department. He has interviewed two people for the job, which pays up to $36,000 annually.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2005
Manchester officials said they are pleased with the results of a two-year Main Street beautification project that includes new sidewalks, streetlights and landscaping. "It's looking good," said Mayor Christopher B. D'Amario. The $4.2 million streetscape project, between Beaver Street and Holland Drive, includes new and improved sidewalks, retaining walls, storm drains, curbs, streetlights and other landscaping. It was primarily funded by a State Highway Administration program that worked with local municipalities to improve their main streets.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | December 15, 1993
The 10th try was a charm.At its regular meeting last night, the Manchester Town Council, in its 10th attempt, chose Christopher D'Amario to fill the council vacancy created when John A. Riley resigned Oct. 12.Nine previous ballots, cast in four prior council meetings, produced 2-2 ties.Last night, Councilman Robert Kolodziejski nominated Mr. D'Amario, who was first runner-up in the May 18 council election with 80 votes. The lowest successful candidate, incumbent Councilwoman Charlotte B. Collett, received 87 votes.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | July 27, 1994
The Manchester Town Council meeting that was scheduled for tonight has been postponed because members are not ready to discuss a proposed moratorium on building permits.The discussion, the only item on tonight's agenda, has been moved to the Aug. 9 council meeting, said Town Manager Terry Short.Council members decided to await the completion of a study of Manchester's water system before taking up the moratorium proposal."We thought it would be better to have the information available before taking any action," Mr. Short said.
NEWS
June 21, 1993
Mayor appoints D'Amario to board in ManchesterManchester Mayor Earl A. J. "Tim" Warehime Jr. has appointed Christopher D'Amario to the town Board of Elections Supervisors, which also serves as the town's ethics board.The vacancy was created when board member Joe Lovetro moved out of the area and resigned from the board.Mr. D'Amario was an unsuccessful candidate for the Manchester Town Council in the May 18 election. He was a member of the town ad-hoc committee on water and sewers, which the council recently disbanded.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | May 19, 1993
Manchester residents voted for experience in yesterday' Town Council race, electing the former clerk-treasurer, the former water and wastewater superintendent, and the only incumbent running for re-election.Kathryn L. Riley, who was Manchester clerk-treasurer for 23 years, garnered 136 votes. Douglas E. Myers, who was water and wastewater superintendent for nine years, got 105.Incumbent Councilwoman Charlotte Collett, who spent 12 years on the town's planning and zoning and appeals boards, received 87 votes.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | May 26, 1994
After more than two months of deadlocks, the Manchester Town Council finally picked a fifth council member to replace Robert Kolodziejski, who resigned in March.Shouts of "Hurrah" and "Finally" erupted from the audience as the council voted 3-1 to name political novice James J. Singer to complete the unexpired term.Mr. Singer, a 37-year Manchester resident, said he decided to seek the post after getting fed up with the council's inability to make decisions."I have an interest in things that go on in public leadership," said the retired Black & Decker machine tool operator.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2001
Manchester has lost its town manager, but it has a councilman willing to take on the job. Philip L. Arbaugh, a retired educator, resigned from the part-time position last week after more than two years in the job, which pays $35,000 annually. At 53, Arbaugh said he is no longer interested in working a 40-hour week. "I went there as a part-time employee, but this job really requires a full-time commitment," Arbaugh said. "I am retired, and I want to look at other opportunities. I hope they can find someone who can give it the hours needed and do a good job."
NEWS
February 26, 2004
Manchester drivers can rest easy about intersection camera The mayor of Manchester wants residents to know that he is not trying to catch them running red lights at York and Main streets near Town Hall. Mayor Christopher B. D'Amario said he has received almost a dozen calls and e-mail messages and was stopped in a store this week after cameras were installed on the traffic signal by the State Highway Administration. "I noticed it Monday," he said. "Now everybody in town thinks I'm after them with red-light cameras."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 2, 2003
A Manchester councilwoman who worked with community groups and town merchants will be stepping down after this month's town meeting because she is relocating to shorten the commute to her job in Hagerstown. "I am moving Dec. 5," said Mary E. Minderlein, 49, who was elected for a second term in May, said she is moving next month to Greencastle, Pa., which she said is a 10-minute drive from her job as benefits manager for Garden State Tanning Inc., a manufacturer of leather upholstery for automobiles.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2003
Manchester voters go to the polls today for an election with no contested races, but Mayor Christopher B. D'Amario says voters still can register their opinions. "Usually in a contested election, we get about 300 voters," said D'Amario, who is running unopposed for a second term. "I'd be thrilled if 300 people come out. That would be a vote of confidence." Two candidates are running for two open council seats. The paper-ballot voting runs from 7 a.m. until 8 p.m. at the Memorial Building.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2001
Manchester Town Council has voted to abolish the town manager post for six months, and re-evaluate whether the position is needed then. The council's decision occurs after the departure of Philip L. Arbaugh, who resigned the post this month after 2 1/2 years. Councilman Brooks Rugemer had applied for the manager's job and did not participate in the closed session Tuesday night. He was notified yesterday by Mayor Christopher B. D'Amario through electronic mail of the 4-0 vote. Rugemer, whose four-year term expires in May, had decided not to seek re-election when he gave the town his resume.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2001
Manchester has hired a police chief who will begin duty next month, according to Mayor Christopher B. D'Amario. After interviewing several candidates, the mayor recommended Charles Lewis, 46, who lives near Easton in Talbot County and is a deputy sheriff there. Lewis' 16-year career in law enforcement has included service as police chief in the town of Ridgely in Caroline County from 1998 to1999, 6 1/2 years as a town officer in St. Michaels, where he was a sergeant, and 2 1/2 as a detective for the Wicomico County sheriff.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2001
Manchester has lost its town manager, but it has a councilman willing to take on the job. Philip L. Arbaugh, a retired educator, resigned from the part-time position last week after more than two years in the job, which pays $35,000 annually. At 53, Arbaugh said he is no longer interested in working a 40-hour week. "I went there as a part-time employee, but this job really requires a full-time commitment," Arbaugh said. "I am retired, and I want to look at other opportunities. I hope they can find someone who can give it the hours needed and do a good job."
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2001
Manchester Town Council has voted to abolish the town manager post for six months, and re-evaluate whether the position is needed then. The council's decision occurs after the departure of Philip L. Arbaugh, who resigned the post this month after 2 1/2 years. Councilman Brooks Rugemer had applied for the manager's job and did not participate in the closed session Tuesday night. He was notified yesterday by Mayor Christopher B. D'Amario through electronic mail of the 4-0 vote. Rugemer, whose four-year term expires in May, had decided not to seek re-election when he gave the town his resume.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 7, 1999
Barring a write-in campaign, Manchester Councilman Christopher D'Amario will run unopposed for mayor in the May 18 municipal election.The filing deadline was Monday, and town officials said no other candidates had filed to fill the seat held by Mayor Elmer C. Lippy Jr., 78, who announced last week that he would not seek re-election because of health concerns.D'Amario, 37, said he waited to see what Lippy planned to do before deciding to seek the town's highest office."If Elmer had decided to run again, I would not have run against him," D'Amario, a forensic chemist for the Baltimore County Police Department, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2001
Timothy G. Timmons, Manchester's police chief, has resigned for family reasons after rising through the ranks of the four-man department to become its chief in 1997. Manchester Mayor Christopher D'Amario said Tuesday the search for a police chief for the town of 3,200 has started. "I am, as aggressively as I can, pursuing a new police chief," said D'Amario, a civilian employee of the Baltimore County Police Department. He has interviewed two people for the job, which pays up to $36,000 annually.
BUSINESS
By Charles Belfoure and Charles Belfoure,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 5, 1999
In an 1880 history book of Western Maryland, it was observed that Manchester possessed, "all the elements for enlightened existence in the country remote from the temptations and embarrassments of the city."Today, people still move to this small town in northern Carroll County 30 miles from Baltimore in order to have a quiet country existence. But, instead of living in remote rural subdivisions, residents are closely connected to a place that retains a small-town flavor and friendliness.Manchester's main street is Route 30, also known as the Hanover Pike.
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