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April 25, 2004
On April 23, 2004, JOSEPH T., SR., youngest son of the late Annunciata and former Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro, Jr. and devoted father of Joseph T. D'Alesandro, Jr.; dear brother of former Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro, III, Franklin, Nicholas, the Honorable Nancy D'Alesandro Pelosi and the late Hector. And he will be sadly missed by devoted relatives including 15 nieces and nephews and many grand-nieces and grand-nephews. Funeral services will be held at the family owned JOSEPH N. ZANNINO JR FUNERAL HOME, 263 S. Conkling Street (at Gough)
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 3, 2011
Guy J. Matricciani Sr., an underground utilities contractor and local philanthropist, died of pneumonia Thursday at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 96 and resided at the Blakehurst Retirement Community after living in Homeland for many years. He was the son of John and Lucy Matricciani. His father, who founded the John Mattricciani construction firm, immigrated from Italy in 1907 and lived in the same house on Exeter Street in Little Italy for the rest of his life. Father and son worked together in the business.
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NEWS
By DeWitt Bliss and Rafael Alvarez and DeWitt Bliss and Rafael Alvarez,Sun Staff Writers | April 5, 1995
Nancy D'Alesandro, the matriarch of a Baltimore family that sent loved ones to City Hall and Congress, died Monday at Mercy Medical Center after a heart attack at her lifelong home on Albemarle Street in Little Italy. She was 86.Mrs. D'Alesandro was a traditional Italian wife from the Old Country who nevertheless raised a namesake daughter who now represents California's 5th Congressional District.Her husband, Thomas D'Alesandro Jr., was the legendary mayor of Baltimore from 1947 to 1959 and served multiple terms in the House of Representatives.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
Expect an influx of starchily dressed and municipally minded visitors this weekend, as more than 1,100 elected officials and staff members from around the country descend on Baltimore for the U.S. Conference of Mayors. They'll be chatting about computerized manhole covers, new uses for natural gas and the reading skills of third-graders, among other civic matters. And they'll be hashing out a platform on weighty issues such as the military's involvement in Afghanistan and federal budget cuts.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | December 25, 1995
Hector D'Alesandro, a retired court clerk whose father and brother were mayors of Baltimore and whose sister is a congresswoman, died early Saturday of cancer in his late parents' home on Albemarle Street in Little Italy. He was 60.Mr. D'Alesandro was a lifelong resident of Baltimore who worked in the Office of the Clerk of the Baltimore City Circuit Court for 38 years. He retired in 1993.Mr. D'Alesandro may have been best known for his family name, which has become synonymous with politics.
NEWS
October 11, 2001
FOR MARYLAND, Rep. Nancy Pelosi's rise to the second-highest office in the Republican-controlled House had a bittersweet quality. On a vote of 118-95, she became Democratic whip at the expense of another talented Marylander, Rep. Steny H. Hoyer. Mr. Hoyer would certainly have had more power to wield on behalf of this state had he won, but his value to the House and to his Southern Maryland district should be undiminished. Although this is the second time he has failed to win this post, he would not have drawn 95 votes without considerable respect from his colleagues.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | August 16, 1994
WITH SOME key statewide political races looking unpredictable this fall, the pundits probably will call some of the races "hard fought" after the elections.But probably no contest will equal what many view as the hardest fought local election in recent history. It was the 1938 Democratic primary election when Tommy D'Alesandro Jr., in his first race for Congress, beat 3rd District incumbent Vincent Palmisano. That campaign had everything -- wild electioneering, premature victory celebrations, calls for recounts.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 9, 1995
In the summer of 1992, in a gesture of high political honor and long family friendship, Nancy D'Alesandro invited William Donald Schaefer to sit at her table for a neighborhood spaghetti dinner at St. Leo's Roman Catholic Church in Little Italy. The governor of Maryland accepted. Then Nancy D'Alesandro changed her mind.Days after the invitation arrived, Schaefer made the colossal political blunder -- to Mrs. D'Alesandro, and to other Democrats -- of endorsing George Bush for president. The earth slipped its axis.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1998
Tommy D'Alesandro III has something he wants to say about the great Baltimore riot of 30 years ago. He wants to clear up misunderstandings about how it affected him, and why he quit as mayor after only one term. And a few other things.D'Alesandro has been thinking a lot about the riot lately. It was sparked by the murder of Martin Luther King Jr., 30 years ago today.Baltimore was among the hardest-hit cities in the 1968 violence -- six people died, 700 were hurt and $13.5 million worth of property was destroyed.
NEWS
September 16, 2005
On September 11, 2005, SHIRLEYMARIAN (nee Humphreys), beloved wife of Charles E. Grim; devoted mother of David Grim and Jennifer Miller; sister of Richard and Ronald Humphreys and La Verne D'Alesandro. Visiting at the Lassahn Funeral Home, Inc., 7401 Belair Road (Overlea) on Friday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Services will be held on Saturday at 11 A.M. Interment Parkwood Cemetery.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2010
Dee Tana loved Sunday's Columbus Day celebration, loved the Italian military band that came all the way from Rome to play, the dignitaries who laid wreaths at the foot of the Columbus monument, the five-block procession from St. Leo's to Columbus Plaza off President Street. "It's all about our pride," she said, echoing the sentiment of many of the dozens of Baltimore's Italian-Americans who gathered on the western edge of Little Italy to celebrate one of the old country's favorite sons.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN REPORTER | April 19, 2007
James Peter Lazzati, who owned a utility-supply company and was the patriarch of a family with 11 children, died Tuesday of pneumonia at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Towson resident was 90. Born and raised in Little Italy, he was a 1935 graduate of Loyola High School and earned a bachelor's degree at Loyola College. As a young man, he boxed at St. Wenceslaus Hall in East Baltimore and in 1981 was inducted in the Maryland Boxing Hall of Fame. During World War II, he enlisted in the Army Air Forces and was assigned to the Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyard as an instructor.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | February 22, 2007
Thomas J. O'Donnell Sr., a former reporter for The Sun who later was a longtime aide to Baltimore Mayor Thomas D'Alesandro Jr., died Tuesday of heart failure at Easton Memorial Hospital. He was 95 and a resident of Wittman in Talbot County. Mr. O'Donnell was born in South Baltimore and moved with his family to Hampden in 1913. He attended St. Thomas parochial school and City College. "He really had little formal education and was largely self-taught. After his father's death, he left school to help support his family during the Depression," said a son, Frank J. O'Donnell of Kensington.
NEWS
February 22, 2007
Franklin D. Roosevelt D'Alesandro, a retired city courthouse clerk and member of the family that includes two former Baltimore mayors and U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, died of cancer yesterday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Hamilton resident was 73. Known as Roosie, he was born in Baltimore on March 7, 1933 - shortly after the first inauguration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, for whom he was named. He was the second son of Annunciata and Thomas D'Alesandro Jr., who was mayor of Baltimore from 1947 to 1959 and earlier served in the House of Representatives.
NEWS
January 15, 2007
Mary Violet "Vi" Piracci, matriarch of a well-known Baltimore family, died of complications of old age Thursday at Brighton Gardens in Towson. The former Baltimore resident was 90. The daughter of a streetcar conductor, she would often regale her grandchildren with stories of riding the rails with her father, Harry Campbell, who would introduce her to the passengers. She attended Baltimore public schools. Mrs. Piracci was the widow of Dominic A. Piracci Sr., a contractor who built many of the area's public buildings, including the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre and the Hirshhorn Museum at the Smithsonian Institution.
NEWS
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,Public Editor | January 14, 2007
Baltimore native Nancy Pelosi, the first female speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, has received considerable coverage in The Sun - and will continue to be in the spotlight for years to come. The Sun's Washington bureau has written extensively about her legislative agenda and political career, including her prominent role last week in expressing her party's opposition to President Bush's decision to increase the number of American troops in Iraq. Metro reporters have explored in detail her Baltimore political roots - she is the daughter of former Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro Jr. and the sister of former Mayor Thomas L. D'Alesandro III - including a Jan. 6 article about her celebratory return to the Little Italy section of the city where she grew up. But no article about Pelosi, a California Democrat, has generated as much reader response as Sun fashion reporter Tanika White's Jan. 4 Today section centerpiece examining the House speaker's fashion sense and personal style.
NEWS
September 1, 1999
1943: Theodore R. McKeldin, a progressive Republican, brings oratory and social conscience to City Hall1947: Thomas J. D'Alesandro Jr., the brash New Deal Democrat, rides in on the coattails of James H. "Jack" Pollack, last of the bosses.1959: J. Harold Grady, Philip H. Goodman and R. Walter Graham -- the Three Gs for Good Government -- win with the help of Irvin Kovens in his first big hurrah. Pollack and D'Alesandro lose in blow to the old machine.1963: McKeldin wins a second term, declaring in his inauguration speech that Baltimore's Inner Harbor should be rescued from grime and disuse.
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