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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | May 10, 1991
A week after hoisting a 180-pound ovarian cyst from the abdomen of a West Virginia woman, doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital said yesterday that she stands a good chance for recovery and hopes her story will prompt women to get routine gynecological care."
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Those who have a habit of biting their lips may find that a small bluish bump has developed inside their mouth. It might disappear on its own or it might linger. Dr. Zaineb Hassan Makhzoumi, an assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, said they are more annoying than dangerous. But those who suffer from them may want to have them removed by a doctor. How common are mucous cysts, and why do they form? Mucous cysts, also known as mucoceles, are quite common in the general population, usually occurring on the lower lip. The majority of cases (70 percent)
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff xlB | May 10, 1991
Surgeon John L. Currie described it as "a water balloon so bi I couldn't get my arms around it. And I have a 35-inch sleeve.""It" was a 180-pound ovarian cyst, cut and hoisted from a 40-year-old West Virginia woman last week in a 9 1/2 -hour operation at Johns Hopkins Hospital.It is believed to be the fourth-largest ovarian cyst on record. The biggest was a 328-pounder removed from a woman in Texas in 1905.In the first detailed description of the West Virginia woman's cyst, and the complicated, life-saving surgery to remove it, Currie yesterday described his patient as a "very intelligent and articulate woman" who saw the event as "a chance to change her life.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2011
An Ellicott City obstetrician is accused of botching a woman's surgery last year, removing a healthy ovary and fallopian tube on the patient's right side when the doctor was supposed to excise a cyst on the left, according to a complaint filed in Baltimore Circuit Court. The alleged mistake left Nadege Neim, 31, with diminished fertility and facing a second surgical procedure to treat the remaining ovary, her lawyers say. Last week, she and her husband filed a medical malpractice suit seeking unspecified damages against Dr. Maureen Muoneke of Women's Care LLC, claiming the doctor operated on the wrong body part, neglected to get Neim's consent for the removal of anything and caused damage to her marriage.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2011
Seeing a chance to stop one of the most deadly kinds of cancer before it forms, doctors at Johns Hopkins and at other hospitals around the nation are focusing on the common pancreatic cyst. Up to 20 percent of pancreatic cancer begins as one of these small, fluid-filled brown lesions. And left to grow unabated, pancreatic cancer kills 95 percent of sufferers within five years. "We have a wonderful opportunity to intervene at an early stage," Dr. Anne Marie Lennon , an assistant professor and director of a new Hopkins Multidisciplinary Pancreatic Cyst Program.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | September 27, 1991
It is as easy to call "Rambling Rose" the best American movie in months as it is difficult to say why.Set in Depression-era Georgia, this film hits the viewer with the force of a Peter Taylor short story or a novel by Reynolds Price -- Southern fiction at its Chekhovian best. That is to say that "Rambling Rose" is filled with characters who are at once true to life and people you'd like to know. It seems at first "merely" a good, somewhat leisurely story until, before you know what's happened to you, it reaches deep into your heart.
NEWS
February 27, 2000
Hand Center doctor performs new cyst removal procedure Dr. Stacey H. Berner, medical director of the Hand Center at Carroll County General Hospital and Northwest Hospital Center, has become the first surgeon at these sites to use a new procedure to deal with ganglion cysts on the wrist. The procedure, arthroscopic ganglionectomy, avoids the traditional surgical removal of the cyst at the wrist joint. Instead, an electrothermal device is used to remove the cyst. Berner is a fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon specializing in injuries of the hand, wrist, elbow and shoulder.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2011
An Ellicott City obstetrician is accused of botching a woman's surgery last year, removing a healthy ovary and fallopian tube on the patient's right side when the doctor was supposed to excise a cyst on the left, according to a complaint filed in Baltimore Circuit Court. The alleged mistake left Nadege Neim, 31, with diminished fertility and facing a second surgical procedure to treat the remaining ovary, her lawyers say. Last week, she and her husband filed a medical malpractice suit seeking unspecified damages against Dr. Maureen Muoneke of Women's Care LLC, claiming the doctor operated on the wrong body part, neglected to get Neim's consent for the removal of anything and caused damage to her marriage.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | January 12, 2009
A while ago, blog reader Michelle asked for help for a teething baby. I asked Dr. Daniel Levy, a pediatrician who chairs the oral health task force for the Maryland chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, for his tips. Here's what he wrote back: "Teething, or the eruption of the first (deciduous, or 'milk,' teeth) commonly occurs in infants in the period between 4 months and 18 months, with the average around 6-12 months. The bottom two teeth (lower incisors) tend to erupt first, followed by the middle or lateral upper incisors.
SPORTS
July 27, 2010
Oniel Cousins has endured sprains and tears of varying degrees. But the 6-foot-4, 315-pound offensive tackle was not prepared when he began experiencing problems with his throat last month. Soon after, doctors discovered a cyst attached to Cousins' esophagus, and the subsequent operation to remove the cyst is the primary reason the third-year pro began Ravens training camp on the physically-unable-to-perform list Tuesday. Cousins' troubles began innocently enough. "It started out as a little strep throat, and that got better," he recalled.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2011
Seeing a chance to stop one of the most deadly kinds of cancer before it forms, doctors at Johns Hopkins and at other hospitals around the nation are focusing on the common pancreatic cyst. Up to 20 percent of pancreatic cancer begins as one of these small, fluid-filled brown lesions. And left to grow unabated, pancreatic cancer kills 95 percent of sufferers within five years. "We have a wonderful opportunity to intervene at an early stage," Dr. Anne Marie Lennon , an assistant professor and director of a new Hopkins Multidisciplinary Pancreatic Cyst Program.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2011
Ganglion cysts are unsightly and sometimes painful. But while the fluid-filled sacs clustered around wrists and other joints are common, not a lot is known about their cause. A trip to the doctor can give sufferers some peace of mind that they are not a serious medical problem — or some options for having them removed, says Dr. Stacey H. Berner, medical director of the Hand and Upper Extremity Center at Northwest Hospital Center. QUESTION: What are ganglion cysts? ANSWER: Ganglion cysts are fluid-filled tissue sacs.
SPORTS
July 27, 2010
Oniel Cousins has endured sprains and tears of varying degrees. But the 6-foot-4, 315-pound offensive tackle was not prepared when he began experiencing problems with his throat last month. Soon after, doctors discovered a cyst attached to Cousins' esophagus, and the subsequent operation to remove the cyst is the primary reason the third-year pro began Ravens training camp on the physically-unable-to-perform list Tuesday. Cousins' troubles began innocently enough. "It started out as a little strep throat, and that got better," he recalled.
NEWS
August 10, 2009
A ganglion cyst is an abnormal growth or mass adjacent to any joint in the body. It is most commonly seen around the wrist or digits, but can develop near the shoulder, knee or foot. Depending on the location of the cyst, various names have been used to describe the mass. A ganglion adjacent to the nail of the finger is called a mucous cyst, and one behind the knee is called a Baker's cyst. Dr. Keith Segalman, hand surgeon at the Curtis National Hand Center at Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore, discusses what to do about this kind of inflammation: * A ganglion cyst is the most common tumor or growth that occurs in the hand and wrist.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | April 13, 2009
Do you have any information on natural treatments for a sore ganglion cyst on the wrist? I have been using a wrap-around brace on my wrist and would prefer to handle this without medication or surgery. A ganglion cyst is a fluid-filled sac that forms on joints such as the wrist, ankles, feet or fingers. If the sac presses on a nerve, it may be painful. Such cysts often disappear on their own, so "watch and wait" is the first choice for treatment. The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons also recommends wearing a brace to immobilize the joint.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | February 22, 2009
Four weeks ago, Osly St. Preux arrived in Baltimore from his home in Haiti wearing summer clothes and too-tight shoes and with an ugly, gnarled, cancerous mass - one that ended up weighing 3 1/2 pounds - growing out of his right armpit. The 13-year-old was brought to the United States by Dr. Mojtaba Gashti, chief of vascular surgery at Union Memorial Hospital, who met the boy on a medical pilgrimage he takes to the impoverished nation each spring. Knowing he couldn't help him in Haiti, Gashti slogged through red tape, begged other doctors to volunteer their services and ultimately arranged for Osly and his mother to travel to Baltimore.
NEWS
By John F. Kelly | October 14, 1991
I WOKE up one morning a few months ago and realized I had some sort of little lump on my lower eyelid. Was I concerned? Concern is not the word for it. I was frantic. I regard any kind of lump-bump on my body with mortal fear. So I called my doctor, who referred me to an ophthalmologist, who gave me an appointment early the next century. Just kidding; actually, it was six weeks. But in my mental state, it might as well have been 2001. I arrived, sick with fear, at the doctor's office and was duly examined.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | August 8, 1997
Some call it the "ambush predator" or "killer algae." Others, "the cell from hell."By whatever nickname, researchers agree that Pfiesteria piscicida is one macabre microorganism.Part animal, part plant, it shifts among perhaps two dozen different forms. It lurks, motionless and virtually undetectable, on the bottom of a brackish creek or river. Then it swarms up to attack fish -- and possibly unsuspecting fishermen and bathers as well."This is not an organism -- or group of organisms -- that should be taken lightly," said JoAnn Burkholder, a scientist at North Carolina State University who helped identify it. "They're very sneaky."
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | January 12, 2009
A while ago, blog reader Michelle asked for help for a teething baby. I asked Dr. Daniel Levy, a pediatrician who chairs the oral health task force for the Maryland chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, for his tips. Here's what he wrote back: "Teething, or the eruption of the first (deciduous, or 'milk,' teeth) commonly occurs in infants in the period between 4 months and 18 months, with the average around 6-12 months. The bottom two teeth (lower incisors) tend to erupt first, followed by the middle or lateral upper incisors.
NEWS
By GAILOR LARGE and GAILOR LARGE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 16, 2005
My left wrist has been bothering me (on the top, not the inside). I don't notice it often, but when I do it's severe enough to keep me from doing things like push-ups. What do you think it is? We posed your question to Libby Harnois, outpatient physical therapist at St. Joseph Medical Center. She suggests these three possible causes: (a) a cyst, probably a ganglion cyst, (b) nerve impingement, or (c) bony impaction. The ganglion cyst is most common, she says, and "If it's large enough, a cyst would interfere with join mechanics and become painful."
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