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Cyrano De Bergerac

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March 21, 1991
Kevin Costner has racked up yet another award of sorts for ''Dances With Wolves.'' Evening Sun readers and callers to Lou Cedrone's SUNDIAL Oscar Line make Costner the clear favorite to win Monday night's Academy Award for Best Actor of 1990. Costner's story of a Civil War soldier who wants to see the frontier before it's too late is up for 12 Oscars.Coster received 69 of the 122 votes cast, or 57 percent of the total.Robert De Niro (''Awakenings'') was second with 25 percent, followed by Jeremy Irons (''Reversal of Fortune'')
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By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | May 4, 2007
Photos by Bud Johnsonspecial to the sun Colonial Players subscribes to the showbiz adage "leave 'em laughing" as the company on East Street closes this season with Moon Over Buffalo. Tony-award winner Ken Ludwig set his comedy in 1953 in Buffalo's Erlanger Theatre, where nearly-washed-up actors George and Charlotte Hay are performing an alternating schedule of Cyrano de Bergerac and Private Lives. The couple learns that legendary film director Frank Capra is coming to Buffalo to catch their performance and perhaps offer George a job. George may miss his last chance at stardom because he has a drinking problem.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | February 7, 1991
Director Jean-Paul Rappeneau has done for ''Cyrano de Bergerac'' what Franco Zeffirelli did for ''Hamlet.'' Zeffirelli's screen version of the Shakespearean tragedy, continuing at local theaters, has been done with immense style, enough to make us care for the characters anew.Rappeneau does the same for ''Cyrano,'' which was written by Edmond Rostand and was first produced in Paris 93 years ago. The play, done with frequency on the American stage, was done as a film in 1950, with Jose Ferrer as the 17th century fighter-poet with the outsize nose.
NEWS
December 5, 2004
McDaniel College to screen, discuss movie `Awara Soup' McDaniel College's Office of Multicultural Services will hold its monthly film series on "Exploring Our Connections: Documenting Our Lives" at 7 p.m. tomorrow in Hill Hall Room 108. Awara Soup will be shown with subtitles. The film focuses on a global village in the backcountry of French Guyana on the edge of South America. In Mana, 1,500 people speak 13 different languages and live together in harmony. Refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m. A discussion of the film will be held after the viewing.
FEATURES
February 13, 1991
The nominees for the 63rd annual Academy Awards:PICTURE: "Awakenings," "Dances With Wolves," "Ghost," "Th Godfather, Part III," "GoodFellas."ACTOR: Kevin Costner, "Dances With Wolves"; Robert De Niro "Awakenings"; Gerard Depardieu, "Cyrano de Bergerac"; Richard Harris, "The Field"; Jeremy Irons, "Reversal of Fortune."ACTRESS: Kathy Bates, "Misery"; Anjelica Huston, "Th Grifters"; Julia Roberts, "Pretty Woman"; Meryl Streep, "Postcards From the Edge"; Joanne Woodward, "Mr. & Mrs. Bridge."SUPPORTING ACTOR: Bruce Davison, "Longtime Companion"; Andy Garcia, "The Godfather, Part III"; Graham Greene, "Dances With Wolves"; Al Pacino, "Dick Tracy'" Joe Pesci, "GoodFellas."
NEWS
December 5, 2004
McDaniel College to screen, discuss movie `Awara Soup' McDaniel College's Office of Multicultural Services will hold its monthly film series on "Exploring Our Connections: Documenting Our Lives" at 7 p.m. tomorrow in Hill Hall Room 108. Awara Soup will be shown with subtitles. The film focuses on a global village in the backcountry of French Guyana on the edge of South America. In Mana, 1,500 people speak 13 different languages and live together in harmony. Refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m. A discussion of the film will be held after the viewing.
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By Chris Hewitt and Chris Hewitt,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 24, 2000
There's a movie opening today that is so indistinctive I can barely remember its name. I think it's called "Whatever It Takes," but it could just as easily be "Can't Hardly Wait," "Down to You," "Crazy for You," "Drives Me Crazy," "She's All That" or any of a half-dozen other movies with two teen-agers who don't realize they are perfect for each other, a loopy best friend who doesn't shower, a date that goes horribly wrong and a climactic prom scene in...
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By New York Times | January 27, 1992
Jose Ferrer, renowned as the cool, cerebral, and idiosyncratic actor who won an Academy Award playing Cyrano de Bergerac, died yesterday at Doctors' Hospital, in Coral Gables, Fla.A family spokesman gave his age as 80, although some reference works said he was 83. He was a resident of Miami. His family said he died after a brief illness but did not disclose its nature.Ferrer's work spanned the stage, films and television for more than half a century. He organized a successful cruise ship band in college, played Iago to Paul Robeson's Othello, appeared in the original television pilot of "Kojak," sang opera at the Brooklyn Academy of Music and the Beverly Hills Opera and made guest appearances on the "Newhart" TV series.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 15, 2002
Not unlike the handsome soldier who falls in love with a beautiful woman but doesn't know the words to woo her in Cyrano de Bergerac, the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival's production of Edmund Rostand's classic play is an effort whose ambition exceeds its abilities. It's a valiant effort and one that features a few strong key performances. But like its title character, this is a play that needs to be brimming with, to borrow Cyrano's word, "panache" and style. A number of factors countermand that in director Joe Brady's al fresco presentation in the Evergreen House meadow.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 7, 1991
A nose is a nose is a nose, especially when appended to the visage of M. de Bergerac, of Paris, France, noted raconteur, swordsman, drama critic, poet, wit and self-pitier.Jean-Paul Rappeneau's sumptuous, swirling version of Edmond Rostand's "Cyrano de Bergerac," with the great Gerard Depardieu as the cavalier with the Scud for a snout, opens today at the Charles. The film works hard to exile English-speaking audiences in the first act, and just manages to fail; but by the second half hour, Rappeneau has found his tone and the movie just gets better and better.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 15, 2002
Not unlike the handsome soldier who falls in love with a beautiful woman but doesn't know the words to woo her in Cyrano de Bergerac, the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival's production of Edmund Rostand's classic play is an effort whose ambition exceeds its abilities. It's a valiant effort and one that features a few strong key performances. But like its title character, this is a play that needs to be brimming with, to borrow Cyrano's word, "panache" and style. A number of factors countermand that in director Joe Brady's al fresco presentation in the Evergreen House meadow.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2000
Stanley Tucci, who directed and stars in "Joe Gould's Secret," wasn't immediately drawn to the titular character. Seven years ago, his wife gave him "Up At the Old Hotel," a collection of writings by the late New Yorker writer Joseph Mitchell, whose most legendary articles were about a Greenwich Village eccentric named Joe Gould. "I fell in love with it, and immediately wanted to make a film out of a lot of different stories," Tucci said during a recent telephone conversation. But, he added, the Joe Gould pieces didn't speak to him. "I thought this is the one everybody would want to make a movie out of, because of the crazy guy," he said.
FEATURES
By Chris Hewitt and Chris Hewitt,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 24, 2000
There's a movie opening today that is so indistinctive I can barely remember its name. I think it's called "Whatever It Takes," but it could just as easily be "Can't Hardly Wait," "Down to You," "Crazy for You," "Drives Me Crazy," "She's All That" or any of a half-dozen other movies with two teen-agers who don't realize they are perfect for each other, a loopy best friend who doesn't shower, a date that goes horribly wrong and a climactic prom scene in...
FEATURES
By New York Times | January 27, 1992
Jose Ferrer, renowned as the cool, cerebral, and idiosyncratic actor who won an Academy Award playing Cyrano de Bergerac, died yesterday at Doctors' Hospital, in Coral Gables, Fla.A family spokesman gave his age as 80, although some reference works said he was 83. He was a resident of Miami. His family said he died after a brief illness but did not disclose its nature.Ferrer's work spanned the stage, films and television for more than half a century. He organized a successful cruise ship band in college, played Iago to Paul Robeson's Othello, appeared in the original television pilot of "Kojak," sang opera at the Brooklyn Academy of Music and the Beverly Hills Opera and made guest appearances on the "Newhart" TV series.
FEATURES
March 21, 1991
Kevin Costner has racked up yet another award of sorts for ''Dances With Wolves.'' Evening Sun readers and callers to Lou Cedrone's SUNDIAL Oscar Line make Costner the clear favorite to win Monday night's Academy Award for Best Actor of 1990. Costner's story of a Civil War soldier who wants to see the frontier before it's too late is up for 12 Oscars.Coster received 69 of the 122 votes cast, or 57 percent of the total.Robert De Niro (''Awakenings'') was second with 25 percent, followed by Jeremy Irons (''Reversal of Fortune'')
FEATURES
February 13, 1991
The nominees for the 63rd annual Academy Awards:PICTURE: "Awakenings," "Dances With Wolves," "Ghost," "Th Godfather, Part III," "GoodFellas."ACTOR: Kevin Costner, "Dances With Wolves"; Robert De Niro "Awakenings"; Gerard Depardieu, "Cyrano de Bergerac"; Richard Harris, "The Field"; Jeremy Irons, "Reversal of Fortune."ACTRESS: Kathy Bates, "Misery"; Anjelica Huston, "Th Grifters"; Julia Roberts, "Pretty Woman"; Meryl Streep, "Postcards From the Edge"; Joanne Woodward, "Mr. & Mrs. Bridge."SUPPORTING ACTOR: Bruce Davison, "Longtime Companion"; Andy Garcia, "The Godfather, Part III"; Graham Greene, "Dances With Wolves"; Al Pacino, "Dick Tracy'" Joe Pesci, "GoodFellas."
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2000
Stanley Tucci, who directed and stars in "Joe Gould's Secret," wasn't immediately drawn to the titular character. Seven years ago, his wife gave him "Up At the Old Hotel," a collection of writings by the late New Yorker writer Joseph Mitchell, whose most legendary articles were about a Greenwich Village eccentric named Joe Gould. "I fell in love with it, and immediately wanted to make a film out of a lot of different stories," Tucci said during a recent telephone conversation. But, he added, the Joe Gould pieces didn't speak to him. "I thought this is the one everybody would want to make a movie out of, because of the crazy guy," he said.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film critic | February 7, 1991
It wasn't the nose. It wasn't the wit. It wasn't the romance. It was the solitude.In "Cyrano de Bergerac," director Jean-Paul Rappeneau saw not a great romantic -- but a big-time lonely guy."This appealed to me," said Rappeneau, speaking from Paris through an interpreter, "a man imprisoned in his own solitude. The authentic Cyrano was an artist who lived alone and died alone. There's something about the death of an artist that I can relate to. I too am a solitary and as Cyrano tries to fight his own loneliness, I try to fight mine."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film critic | February 7, 1991
It wasn't the nose. It wasn't the wit. It wasn't the romance. It was the solitude.In "Cyrano de Bergerac," director Jean-Paul Rappeneau saw not a great romantic -- but a big-time lonely guy."This appealed to me," said Rappeneau, speaking from Paris through an interpreter, "a man imprisoned in his own solitude. The authentic Cyrano was an artist who lived alone and died alone. There's something about the death of an artist that I can relate to. I too am a solitary and as Cyrano tries to fight his own loneliness, I try to fight mine."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 7, 1991
A nose is a nose is a nose, especially when appended to the visage of M. de Bergerac, of Paris, France, noted raconteur, swordsman, drama critic, poet, wit and self-pitier.Jean-Paul Rappeneau's sumptuous, swirling version of Edmond Rostand's "Cyrano de Bergerac," with the great Gerard Depardieu as the cavalier with the Scud for a snout, opens today at the Charles. The film works hard to exile English-speaking audiences in the first act, and just manages to fail; but by the second half hour, Rappeneau has found his tone and the movie just gets better and better.
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