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TRAVEL
October 17, 2010
"Cyprus: Crossroads of Civilizations" exhibit What: A new exhibition featuring hundreds of artifacts from Cyprus on view for the first time in the United States. "Cyprus: Crossroads of Civilizations" marks the 50th anniversary of the independence of the Republic of Cyprus and showcases more than 200 artifacts that range from items from the earliest villages to medieval religious art and give an overview of the island's 11,000-year history. Among the objects on display for the first time in the United States are gold jewelry dating to 750 to 480 B.C.; vases, bowls and sculptures from the Hellenistic (325 to 50 B.C.)
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NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | March 24, 2014
There are fewer things more pathetic than watching someone take a running dive off a high board only to end in a spectacular belly flop and still think that they're scoring a perfect 10. That's President Barack Obama right now on the issue of sanctions against Russia. It's a worrying attitude that increasingly permeates Western culture. Europe and America supported a coup d'├ętat against a democratically elected government and president in the Ukrainian capital of Kiev, which in turn led to Russia backing a democratic vote March 16 in Crimea -- the southeast corner of the country -- to reject the coup and separate.
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NEWS
February 12, 1993
Don't toast the reunification of Cyprus yet. But the election Sunday in the Greek-ethnic country, occupying part of the island of the same name, was a step in that direction. It was a ringing mandate for moderation, which is rare these days in little countries with big nationalisms.President George Vassiliou, the candidate of the left, came in first with 44 percent of the vote. That forces him into a run-off on Sunday with Glafcos Clerides, candidate of the right, who won 37 percent, with Mr. Vassiliou the favorite.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2013
Maryland has to settle for the NIT, Cyprus is thinking about taxing bank deposits, and it turns out that your Amazon bestseller won't actually make you rich. Welcome to your post-weekend trends report for Monday, March 18, 2013. An author who managed to briefly have a best-selling book on Amazon last summer has debunked the idea that he's rolling in seven figures -- or even six -- to the fascination of his audience on Salon and Digg. Not much to put in the bank. Meanwhile, banks in Cyprus are getting nervous about that country's plans to tax their account holders.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | January 20, 2002
Away from the world overwhelmed by conflicts in Central Asia and the Middle East, two old men who have been at odds for the better part of half a century are finally talking to each other trying to make peace. The two men are Rauf Denktash, the septuagenarian leader of the minority Turkish community on the Mediterranean island of Cyprus, and Glafkos Clerides, the octogenarian leader of the majority Greek community. Clerides is the elected president of the Republic of Cyprus, a fact that all nations but Turkey accept.
NEWS
July 19, 1991
President Bush's visit to Greece and Turkey, far from being a mere asterisk to the London economic summit, could open the way to new diplomatic initiatives to solve the Cyprus problem. Rarely have U.S. relations been better (simultaneously) with Athens and Ankara, both of which have the present good fortune to have sensible governments.The dispute over Cyprus is rooted in centuries-old ethnic differences between the Greek-Cypriot and Turkish-Cypriot populations. But the political and territorial division of the island goes back only three decades, to the withdrawal of British colonial control and the consequent emergence of nationalist feelings.
NEWS
By Gwinn Owens | July 31, 1991
LAST NIGHT I dreamt I was back in Paralimni. This little village in eastern Cyprus seems never to leave my thoughts. In my heart I am still there, looking across a misty valley toward a magnificent, silent city. I watch a lone shepherd driving his flocks along a narrow road, a puff of dust hovering above them. I say to myself: I hope he knows how far he can venture into that valley without being shot.The shepherd is Everyman. Raising sheep is his living, he has a GwinnOwensfamily to feed.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | June 3, 1991
Washington -- HIS ENEMIES insist that Rauf Denktash is the imaginary president of an imaginary country. He says, to the contrary, that he is the real president of a real country. It gets worse.The European Human Rights Commission avers that Denktash's Turkish Cypriots, who inhabit the northern third of the beautiful and divided island of Cyprus, do not exist as a "body politic." But U.N. Secretary-General Javier Perez de Cuellar says that the two Cypriot communities -- Greek and Turkish -- not only exist but do indeed comprise "two politically equal communities."
FEATURES
By Gwinn Owens | October 13, 1991
The phone number for the Cyprus Tourism Organization in Oct. 13's Travel section was incorrect. The phone number is (212) 683-5280.The Sun regrets the error.Where is the crossroads of the world?Waiting in Larnaca Airport for our departure from a vacation in Cyprus, I made a note of all the cities listed on the arrival and departure board: Vienna, Athens, Benghadsi, Bahrain, Munich, Aden, Amman, Damascus, Cairo, London, Newcastle, Beirut, Edinburgh, Moscow, Jiddah, Sanaa, Paris, Zurich. That should settle the crossroads claim, but if not, consider history.
NEWS
By Robert O. Freedman | August 31, 1998
WHILE THE Monica Lewinsky affair has slowed the wheels of government in Washington, it has had much more dangerous effect on American policy in the Middle East. Not only has President Clinton not been able to prevent the deployment of surface-to-air missiles which Russia sold to the Greek Cypriot side of the divided island of Cyprus, a development that threatens to lead to war between two NATO allies of the United States, Greece and Turkey.The Greek-Turkish conflict on Cyprus has been simmering since the 1970s, when Turkish troops landed in northern Cyprus to protect the Turkish community of the island, which felt threatened by a right-wing Greek Cypriot plan to unite Cyprus with Greece.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | June 28, 2012
As European leaders meet this week in an attempt to once again shoo reality away from the continent's respirator, countries outside the European Union are making it increasingly clear that they'll have no role in prolonging the charade. Cyprus has just asked for a bailout from the EU's ATM, joining Greece, Ireland, Portugal and, most recently, Spain. So what's the excuse this time? Apparently Cyprus' intimate exposure to the Greek economy was more than enough economic Ebola. So another beggar's cup starts rattling just in time for yet another summit of European leaders.
TRAVEL
October 17, 2010
"Cyprus: Crossroads of Civilizations" exhibit What: A new exhibition featuring hundreds of artifacts from Cyprus on view for the first time in the United States. "Cyprus: Crossroads of Civilizations" marks the 50th anniversary of the independence of the Republic of Cyprus and showcases more than 200 artifacts that range from items from the earliest villages to medieval religious art and give an overview of the island's 11,000-year history. Among the objects on display for the first time in the United States are gold jewelry dating to 750 to 480 B.C.; vases, bowls and sculptures from the Hellenistic (325 to 50 B.C.)
NEWS
December 15, 2008
ROBERT CHANDLER, 80 Creator of '60 Minutes' format Robert Chandler, a former CBS executive who played a crucial role in creating the highly rated and critically acclaimed weekly newsmagazine 60 Minutes, died Thursday of heart failure at his home in Pittsfield, Mass. Mr. Chandler was a producer and director of documentaries and election coverage in 1966 when his colleague Don Hewitt proposed a new format: a newsmagazine with several segments rather than the standard hourlong documentary.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | March 13, 2007
Funeral plans are being made for Theophanis "Phanos" Dymiotis, a violinist, composer and adjunct music professor at McDaniel College who died in a Delaware car crash Saturday night. Mr. Dymiotis was returning from Wilmington after a performance with the Delaware Symphony Orchestra when he was killed, officials at the college in Westminster said yesterday. Police said the driver of a northbound car crossed the center line in attempting to pass a tractor-trailer and that the resulting collision killed Mr. Dymiotis and the two occupants of the other car. The 41-year-old Lutherville resident had taught violin at McDaniel since 2004 and was a faculty member in the college's Summer Orchestra Camp.
NEWS
By GADI DECHTER and GADI DECHTER,SUN REPORTER | July 22, 2006
It wasn't the violence in Lebanon that bothered Virginia Radford so much as the trip home. "Yeah, you heard bombs falling, but I felt fine. Lebanon didn't feel like a war zone at all," the Marymount University sophomore said yesterday, moments after landing at Baltimore's airport along with hundreds of other U.S. citizens fleeing the fighting in Lebanon. "The only time I was uncomfortable was when we had to leave." With her mother looking on disapprovingly, the 18-year-old criticized the evacuation as disorganized and chaotic.
NEWS
By DAVID WOOD and DAVID WOOD,SUN REPORTER | July 18, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In what could become the largest evacuation by sea in modern history, about 10,000 Americans and tens of thousands of European and other civilians are expected to begin boarding ships from Beirut today amid the escalating fighting between Israel and Hezbollah forces. The American evacuees are to be ferried to the eastern Mediterranean island of Cyprus on charter ships, watched over by U.S. Marine and Navy jets and warships that will escort the vessels through an Israeli blockade of Lebanon and guard against other threats, according to U.S. military and civilian officials.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | March 13, 2007
Funeral plans are being made for Theophanis "Phanos" Dymiotis, a violinist, composer and adjunct music professor at McDaniel College who died in a Delaware car crash Saturday night. Mr. Dymiotis was returning from Wilmington after a performance with the Delaware Symphony Orchestra when he was killed, officials at the college in Westminster said yesterday. Police said the driver of a northbound car crossed the center line in attempting to pass a tractor-trailer and that the resulting collision killed Mr. Dymiotis and the two occupants of the other car. The 41-year-old Lutherville resident had taught violin at McDaniel since 2004 and was a faculty member in the college's Summer Orchestra Camp.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 3, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush announced yesterday that Greece and Turkey will join a peace conference next month to resolve the bitter dispute that has divided the island of Cyprus for at least 17 years, provided there is "adequate progress" in preliminary talks under way.The announcement, which came during a White House news conference, indicates that the latest campaign to settle the Cyprus problem, launched by U.N. Secretary-General Javier Perez de...
TRAVEL
By Carol Pucci and Carol Pucci,Seattle Times | September 18, 2005
A five-minute walk from where a bunker manned by soldiers divides the Turkish north and Greek south sides of the Mediterranean island of Cyprus, Starbucks manager Faye Avraamidou serves iced lattes to customers relaxing on a sidewalk patio. The signs above the cash register are in Greek and English; the coffee prices are in Cypriot pounds. When Avraamidou finds out that my husband and I are from Seattle, Starbucks' headquarters, she offers us drinks on the house. "Welcome to Cyprus," she says, extending her hand.
NEWS
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2005
A 25-year-old Baltimore-area native and graduate of the Institute of Notre Dame was among those killed when a Cypriot plane crashed into a mountainside north of Athens Sunday, family members said yesterday. Meropi "Popi" Sofocleous had been a crew member aboard Helios Airlines flight ZU522, a spokeswoman from the Cyprus Embassy in Washington confirmed. The flight, which departed from Larnaca, a city in southern Cyprus, was bound for Prague, Czech Republic, after a stop in Athens. All 115 passengers and six crew members were killed in the crash.
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