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By John J. O'Connor and John J. O'Connor,New York Times News Service | May 4, 1992
Who needs Bruce Willis? That's the nose-thumbing attitude being mischievously taken tonight at 9 by Cybill Shepherd in "Stormy Weathers," the ABC movie, which obviously has its eye on a weekly series.Like Maddie Hayes in "Moonlighting," Samantha Weathers -- call her Sam -- is a private investigator with a hands-off attitude and a mouth to back it up.Only Sam doesn't have to parry Dave Addison's repertory of wisecracks. She's very much her own woman, and Ms. Shepherd doesn't let you forget it.Sam used to be called Stormy, but anyone using the nickname these days had better duck.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 25, 2005
Paul Schrader, the screenwriter of Taxi Driver (1976), once asked Martin Scorsese, its director, "This privilege we have of creating unreal images, things that we make up, that never happened - does this privilege, this freedom, allow you to live vicariously? To what extent does it relieve sexual tension?" Scorsese answered, "None" - and a minute later added, "I was crazier when I finished Taxi Driver than when I began." A new 35mm print of Taxi Driver premieres Monday at 9:10 p.m. at AFI Silver Theatre in Silver Spring - and this story about a violently alienated Manhattan cabbie is still crazy, and harrowing, after all these years.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | January 27, 1992
How's this for big-name talent? Cybill Shepherd in a movie written by Larry McMurtry based on a book by Shelby Foote?That's part of the lineup in "Memphis," a made-for-TV movie that premieres at 8 tonight on cable channel TNT. And the whole is even greater than the sum of its parts. This is one of the most stylish, lyrical and finely crafted TV movies of the year. You'll feel the sweat, sex and desperation of the main characters while the film plays. Images of violence and tenderness will rattle around in your head long after the final credits roll.
FEATURES
May 21, 1998
CBS cancelled some big-name series yesterday as it rolled out its fall schedule for advertisers in New York.David Caruso ("Michael Hayes"), Tom Selleck ("The Closer"), Jane Seymour ("Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman"), Cybill Shepherd ("Cybill"), Bob Newhart and Judd Hirsch ("George & Leo") all got pink slips, along with Steven Bochco's heavily-promoted "Brooklyn South."Bryant Gumbel's newsmagazine, "Public Eye," also got the ax, but Gumbel will remain a prominent player at the network, according to Les Moonves, president of CBS Entertainment.
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By John J. O'Connor and John J. O'Connor,New York Times News Service | May 4, 1992
Who needs Bruce Willis? That's the nose-thumbing attitude being mischievously taken tonight at 9 by Cybill Shepherd in "Stormy Weathers," the ABC movie, which obviously has its eye on a weekly series.Like Maddie Hayes in "Moonlighting," Samantha Weathers -- call her Sam -- is a private investigator with a hands-off attitude and a mouth to back it up.Only Sam doesn't have to parry Dave Addison's repertory of wisecracks. She's very much her own woman, and Ms. Shepherd doesn't let you forget it.Sam used to be called Stormy, but anyone using the nickname these days had better duck.
FEATURES
May 21, 1998
CBS cancelled some big-name series yesterday as it rolled out its fall schedule for advertisers in New York.David Caruso ("Michael Hayes"), Tom Selleck ("The Closer"), Jane Seymour ("Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman"), Cybill Shepherd ("Cybill"), Bob Newhart and Judd Hirsch ("George & Leo") all got pink slips, along with Steven Bochco's heavily-promoted "Brooklyn South."Bryant Gumbel's newsmagazine, "Public Eye," also got the ax, but Gumbel will remain a prominent player at the network, according to Les Moonves, president of CBS Entertainment.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 25, 2005
Paul Schrader, the screenwriter of Taxi Driver (1976), once asked Martin Scorsese, its director, "This privilege we have of creating unreal images, things that we make up, that never happened - does this privilege, this freedom, allow you to live vicariously? To what extent does it relieve sexual tension?" Scorsese answered, "None" - and a minute later added, "I was crazier when I finished Taxi Driver than when I began." A new 35mm print of Taxi Driver premieres Monday at 9:10 p.m. at AFI Silver Theatre in Silver Spring - and this story about a violently alienated Manhattan cabbie is still crazy, and harrowing, after all these years.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 25, 2005
If a culture is judged by its heroes, CBS, which tonight presents Martha Stewart, in Martha Behind Bars (9 p.m., WJZ Channel 13), has a lot to answer for. This crackpot hagiography launches a new season of CBS Sunday night movies, with Cybill Shepherd reprising her 2003 role from the network's made-for-TV movie, Martha, Inc. This "sequel's" message? For Martha, even a stint in prison can be transformed into a good thing. s TV season, go online to baltimoresun.com/falltv.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | January 2, 2000
Remembered today as the series that introduced Bruce Willis, "Moonlighting" featured Cybill Shepherd as Maddie Hayes, a suddenly impoverished fashion model who finds that one of her few remaining possessions is the Blue Moon Detective Agency, headed by David Addison (Willis). "Moonlighting" was responsible for some of television's finer hours, including a black-and-white film noir episode. At its worst, "Moonlighting" was a self-indulgent mess. But "Moonlighting" at its best is worth watching -- which you can do today during Bravo's six-episode marathon, starting at 1 p.m. Beginning tomorrow, "Moonlighting" will air weeknights at 7 on Bravo.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 11, 2009
Series Knight Rider: : Mike (Justin Bruening) tells a DEA agent (Maria Menounos) that the plane crash she's investigating was faked and the young federal witness who was aboard has been kidnapped. (8 p.m., WBAL-Channel 11) American Idol: : The Hollywood round continues. (8 p.m., WBFF-Channel 45) Criminal Minds: : The team tracks a serial killer who embalms his victims so he can keep them around for a while. Cybill Shepherd guest stars as a suspect's mother. (9 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13) Lost:: Locke (Terry O'Quinn)
FEATURES
By John J. O'Connor and John J. O'Connor,New York Times News Service | May 4, 1992
Who needs Bruce Willis? That's the nose-thumbing attitude being mischievously taken tonight at 9 by Cybill Shepherd in "Stormy Weathers," the ABC movie, which obviously has its eye on a weekly series.Like Maddie Hayes in "Moonlighting," Samantha Weathers -- call her Sam -- is a private investigator with a hands-off attitude and a mouth to back it up.Only Sam doesn't have to parry Dave Addison's repertory of wisecracks. She's very much her own woman, and Ms. Shepherd doesn't let you forget it.Sam used to be called Stormy, but anyone using the nickname these days had better duck.
FEATURES
By John J. O'Connor and John J. O'Connor,New York Times News Service | May 4, 1992
Who needs Bruce Willis? That's the nose-thumbing attitude being mischievously taken tonight at 9 by Cybill Shepherd in "Stormy Weathers," the ABC movie, which obviously has its eye on a weekly series.Like Maddie Hayes in "Moonlighting," Samantha Weathers -- call her Sam -- is a private investigator with a hands-off attitude and a mouth to back it up.Only Sam doesn't have to parry Dave Addison's repertory of wisecracks. She's very much her own woman, and Ms. Shepherd doesn't let you forget it.Sam used to be called Stormy, but anyone using the nickname these days had better duck.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | January 27, 1992
How's this for big-name talent? Cybill Shepherd in a movie written by Larry McMurtry based on a book by Shelby Foote?That's part of the lineup in "Memphis," a made-for-TV movie that premieres at 8 tonight on cable channel TNT. And the whole is even greater than the sum of its parts. This is one of the most stylish, lyrical and finely crafted TV movies of the year. You'll feel the sweat, sex and desperation of the main characters while the film plays. Images of violence and tenderness will rattle around in your head long after the final credits roll.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | January 2, 1995
In case you aren't confused enough on this first day of the big affiliate switch, CBS has more surprises in store for viewers this week.Starting tonight, the network that bet the farm on baby boomers -- and lost -- is launching an overhaul of its prime-time schedule. Three new weekly series -- all sitcoms -- premiere this week, starting with Cybill Shepherd's "Cybill" tonight. Wednesday, it'sDelta Burke in "Women of the House" and Robert Pastorelli in "Double Rush."Launching this many big-name series so early in the new year is unprecedented and suggests how much ratings trouble CBS is in with its aging audience.
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By Lou Cedrone | January 25, 1991
WOODY ALLEN'S ''Alice'' is a film that must be lauded for its inventiveness, and if, in total, it does not exactly thrill, it is most certainly pleasant.''Alice'' is an Allen homage to Federico Fellini, the director who did all this years ago in his ''8 1/2 '' and ''Juliet of the Spirits.''''8 1/2 '' was Fellini's examination of his own psyche. ''Juliet of the Spirits,'' released in 1965, allowed Mrs. Fellini, Giuletta Masina, her turn on the cinematic couch.In ''Juliet,'' fact was mixed very freely with fiction, illusion with reality and ghost with mortal being.
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