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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2010
Bob Parsons managed the sort of life leap that movies are made of: Bethlehem Steel laborer to dot-com millionaire. The Baltimore native struggled as a student, graduated from Patterson High School by the skin of his teeth and fought in Vietnam before returning to Baltimore and a job at the Sparrows Point steel mill. No thanks, he quickly decided. "That place was no place to work," he said. He ended up at the University of Baltimore, majoring in accounting. After a stint running a small accounting practice, he moved to Iowa, started a software company and — in 1994 — sold it for $64 million to Intuit.
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By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2012
Republican Del. Justin Ready rose during a recent debate in Annapolis to complain that Maryland's process for petitioning a bill to referendum is "complicated and cumbersome. " Del. Ariana Kelly, a Democrat from Montgomery County, had the opposite view. "Shouldn't it be?" she said. "No, petitioning a bill should be easier," Ready, who represents a Carroll County district, fired back. The exchange was remarkable for one reason: It started on the House floor, but it continued in cyberspace, with the two delegates sparring via Twitter.
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NEWS
January 30, 2000
The following is an excerpt from an editorial in Friday's Los Angeles Times: China's no-nonsense-named State Bureau of Secrecy has issued a list of proscriptions to Internet users aimed at protecting the government's control over the flow of information and its monopoly on power. Internet users, including those sending e-mail or participating in chat rooms, are banned from sending or discussing "state secrets." What's a state secret? In practice, it's any information -- for example, corruption within the Communist Party -- that has not been officially released.
EXPLORE
By Doug Miller | June 1, 2011
Just a quick note to let you know that if you’ve bookmarked this blog, you’ll need to redo it. We’re changing the delivery system for our websites, so if you go to your old bookmark you’ll wind up in some kind of cyberspace limbo, and neither of us wants that. If you’d like to bookmark the new and improved Dougout Chatter — and who wouldn’t, after all —  just hover over where it says “blogs” in the new toolbar up top. You’ll get a pop-up menu that has all the blogs.
NEWS
By Abraham Cooper | April 24, 1995
THE EMERGENCE of the information superhighway has transformed the rules of engagement in the marketplace of ideas. Virtually overnight, the new world of cyberspace -- combining the communicative clout of newspapers, telephones, faxes, photo transmittal services, reference libraries and broadcast outlets -- is providing direct access to some 20 million homes and education institutions worldwide.Small wonder that more than 50 hate groups, long frustrated by their inability to package and deliver their message in a consistent format, have rushed to embrace the new technologies.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | July 24, 1995
Washington -- Newt Gingrich will head off to Aspen, Colorado, next month to take part in a conference on ''Cyberspace and the American Dream.'' For two days (at $895 a head) experts will mull implications, from social to economic, of the electronic frontier.Perhaps the speaker should take a look at electronic communication breakthroughs bubbling up at the grassroots -- even in his own backyard, within that much maligned Washington Beltway.Some of the more exciting cyperspace experiments involve poor people and neighborhoods -- those it's been feared would be red-lined off the Information Highway.
NEWS
By Michael Kinsley | July 24, 2005
CYBERSPACE, TO ITS early denizens, was supposed to be a prelapsarian world, free from the taint of commerce and other vices of "meatspace" (as the material world is known), full of sweetness and light and universal siblinghood. In fact, the storyline was Genesis in reverse. Our troubles started when Eve ate the apple of knowledge. Now knowledge had accumulated to the point where it could undo the damage, reconstruct the apple (or Apple) and restore our innocence. As many were saying a decade ago, technology was the real counterculture.
FEATURES
By Todd Copilevitz and Todd Copilevitz,Dallas Morning News | January 8, 1995
Call it the Year of the 'Net, the turning point where everyone with anything to say, sing or display raced to stake a claim in cyberspace.It all came into focus at the Cotton Bowl Nov. 18, when the Rolling Stones broadcast part of their concert to the world via the Internet. Cyberspace, it seems, is destined to be as much a part of our lives as television and radio.True, only a few million Americans are currently using their computers and modems to get on-line. But from all the hype, that was hard to remember.
FEATURES
By Carol Vogel and Carol Vogel,New York Times | April 24, 1995
Thea Westreich is a newbie, a newcomer to cyberspace. But Ms. Westreich, a SoHo-based art consultant, is in good company. As the art world is poised on the edge of its own technological explosion, she and others who are getting involved now are among the pioneers in the field.Artists are creating works for the on-line world. Museums and galleries, private dealers and auction houses are staking out their own territory, too. They're all linking up to the World Wide Web, an international method of handling information over the Internet.
NEWS
By Sandy Close and Nick Montfort | March 13, 1996
SAN FRANCISCO - Thirty years ago a student protest at the University of California over free speech sparked a worldwide chain reaction of youthful rebellion against authority. Is a new generation of free-speech agitators emerging now in cyberspace?Ever since the Telecommunications Act was signed into law, many denizens of cyberspace have taken to the Internet to protest its censorship provisions. But whereas the free-speech militants of the '60s staged campus rallies, classroom boycotts and street demonstrations aimed at bringing life at universities to a halt, today's protesters have largely eschewed public action (apart from a rally at San Francisco's South Park in December)
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2010
Bob Parsons managed the sort of life leap that movies are made of: Bethlehem Steel laborer to dot-com millionaire. The Baltimore native struggled as a student, graduated from Patterson High School by the skin of his teeth and fought in Vietnam before returning to Baltimore and a job at the Sparrows Point steel mill. No thanks, he quickly decided. "That place was no place to work," he said. He ended up at the University of Baltimore, majoring in accounting. After a stint running a small accounting practice, he moved to Iowa, started a software company and — in 1994 — sold it for $64 million to Intuit.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel , andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
It's TMI - too much information, in the language of the Internet, cell phone texts and social media posts. Easy juror access to cyberspace is a growing problem for courts, whether it involves the criminal trial of Baltimore's mayor, an Anne Arundel County murder trial or a Florida drug case. Last week, a Maryland appeals court upended a first-degree murder conviction because a juror consulted Wikipedia for trial information. Earlier this year, the appeals judges erased a conviction for three counts of assault because a juror did cyberspace research and shared the findings with the rest of the jury.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel | December 13, 2009
It's TMI - too much information, in the language of the Internet, cell phone texts and social media posts. Easy juror access to cyberspace is a growing problem for courts, whether it involves the criminal trial of Baltimore's mayor, an Anne Arundel County murder trial or a Florida drug case. Last week, a Maryland appeals court upended a first-degree murder conviction because a juror consulted Wikipedia for trial information. Earlier this year, the appeals judges erased a conviction for three counts of assault because a juror did cyberspace research and shared the findings with the rest of the jury.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | March 10, 2008
WOMEN DRIVE what's on television - husbands and boyfriends decide on movies," says NBC's reigning brilliant, Tina Fey. So, Vanity Fair magazine hits its stride again with an April issue crammed with everything you ever wanted to know about funny women like Ms. Fey, Sarah Silverman, Amy Poehler, et al.; rich payouts to the wealthy we mostly never heard of, but a few will be familiar among those who reaped the financial whirlwind in 2007; feuds and fights...
NEWS
By Siobhan Gorman and Siobhan Gorman,Sun reporter | November 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- President Bush quietly announced yesterday his plans to launch a program targeting terrorists and others who would seek to attack the United States via the Internet, according to lawmakers and budget documents. Bush requested $154 million in preliminary funding for the initiative, which current and former government officials say is expected to become a seven-year, multibillion-dollar program to track threats in cyberspace on both government and private networks. But lawmakers, who received briefings on the initiative only recently, continue to have many questions, and some remain concerned, about whether the program has adequate privacy protections.
FEATURES
By Ann Powers | August 16, 2007
Elton John's recent public outburst about the Internet's effect on pop -- he suggested that a five-year cyberspace shutdown might be the only way to renew the music's creativity -- was greeted with eye rolling and the general consensus that he should splurge on an iPod. But his consternation is understandable. The music industry is in tatters; the noise that amateurs once kept to themselves emanates from every corner of cyberspace, and between the money-obsessed mainstream and the hype-addled underground, there's no agreement on what will endure.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff | December 6, 1995
Husky Labs, regarded as one of Maryland's most promising start-up information technology companies, has moved to cyberspace.Vice President Monica Larson said yesterday that Husky, which designs World Wide Web pages for clients who want to be on the Internet, will now operate with most employees working out of their homes and connected by a computer network.She said the physical headquarters of the company will be outside Shepherdstown, W.Va., at the home to which she and her husband, company founder David Larson Levine, have recently moved.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Content and Thomas Content,Milwaukee Journal Sentinel | August 11, 2007
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. -- The next breakthrough in making driving safer might come from cyberspace, not the vehicle itself. Most of the technologies deployed in the past by the auto industry have been changes inside the vehicle, from making the structure stronger to adding seat belts, airbags and - in certain high-end models - collision-warning systems. But for a new generation of drivers, safety could come through a national wireless network that would enable cars to communicate electronically with one another and with the roads they're driving on. It's an initiative that's expected to roll out over the next 10 to 25 years, experts at an auto industry conference said this week.
BUSINESS
By Mary Umberger and Mary Umberger,Chicago Tribune | March 29, 2007
CHICAGO -- Find your next home on YouTube. That's the latest promise of the phenomenally popular Internet video site and its brethren, where, in addition to viewing such cultural treasures as wedding bloopers and clips from The Simpsons, you can shop for real estate these days. From slick, cinematic productions touting waterfront castles to underlit, homemade tours of modest condos, real estate marketers are eyeing online video as the next way to capture that increasingly elusive creature, the homebuyer.
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