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NEWS
March 3, 2013
If there are nearly 20,000 cyber security jobs are available in the state of Maryland, why hasn't it been shouted from the roof tops ("Cyber help wanted," Feb. 27)? Most employment news we hear now is fairly dismal. With this many high-paying positions needing to be filled, the school system must take more notice. Baltimore's Digital Harbor High School, a marvelous place dedicated to technology and located right in Federal Hill, is one place to start. Recruiters from the National Security Agency, U.S. Cyber Command and other government and private agencies should stop by and encourage students to enroll in computer security programs and pursue degrees in the field.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 25, 2014
From afar, the recent dramatics involving "House of Cards" and the size of the film tax credit it receives from Maryland have offered intrigue worthy of a Hollywood-produced political thriller like, oh, "House of Cards. " The producers threatened to leave, some legislators threatened to seize property, and when the dust cleared in Annapolis, the overall budget for the film tax credit stood at $3.5 million less than supporters wanted. Now that a deal has been struck for the popular Netflix TV series to return to shoot a third season in Maryland, the episode has raised an important question: Is spending so much money to attract or retain film or television productions worth the expense?
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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley tapped a private-sector cyber security veteran to lead a push to promote that industry's job growth in the state, he announced in a visit to Hanover company KEYW Corp. Tuesday. Jeani Park will serve as Maryland's director of cyber development as the state works to woo more cyber firms and train more workers for the growing field. Park has worked in product strategy and marketing for companies including Hewlett Packard and Dell. "This is a huge new issue of national security," said O'Malley, referring to news reports of cyber attacks from China and elsewhere around the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
Convergence Technology Consulting relocated its office to Columbia, almost doubling the space it occupies, the Howard County Economic Development Authority announced Monday. The cyber security firm leased nearly 8,000 square feet in Columbia Gateway Business Park. Previously, its office was in Glen Burnie. Convergence Technology employs 65 people and plans for more expansion over the next few years. The firm generated $30 million in revenue last year and expects to double that in a several years, said Howard County Executive Ken Ulman in a statement welcoming the firm.
NEWS
January 25, 2010
Last year, I stood next to President Barack Obama at the White House, when he pledged to make securing the country's most vital computer networks a top economic and national security priority. It's a task that President Obama has described as the "most serious economic and national security challenge we face as a nation." Recent news that Google was victim to a "highly sophisticated and targeted attack" is a stark reminder that, as individuals and as a nation, we must be more vigilant and more determined in our efforts to secure our cyber infrastructure.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | January 12, 2010
Gov. Martin O'Malley plans to promote Maryland as the "national epicenter" for cyber security innovation and to team with the state's Washington delegation to vie for billions in government spending as the global war on terrorism intensifies efforts to protect computer networks. State and industry officials said Maryland is better positioned than other areas, such as California's Silicon Valley, to be the premier cyber security hub because major defense agencies are based here already.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | June 23, 2009
Maryland technology companies that specialize in cyber security are expecting to reap the benefit of billions in federal spending after President Barack Obama called May 29 for a far-reaching overhaul in the way the country secures its communication and data networks. An already-established cyber security industry in the state, fueled by an infusion of an expected $30 billion in federal spending, could create thousands of jobs and new opportunities for research and development at Maryland universities.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2010
While unemployment lines remain long elsewhere, SafeNet Inc. is one Maryland employer that's hiring. The Belcamp cyber security firm has more than 100 job openings for consultants. But so far this year, it has only been able to fill four of those positions. That's because in the white-hot world of cyber security, there's a lot of opportunity but not enough qualified workers to take advantage. As the federal government, contractors who support federal agencies and private companies ramp up spending to secure complex computer networks, they are all competing for a tight pool of high-tech specialists and workers with government security clearances.
NEWS
October 10, 2001
SINCE 1988, when a software worm effectively shut down the fledgling Internet, we have known cyber-terrorism is possible. Indeed, over the past two decades, hackers and pranksters have momentarily crippled innumerable computers with viruses. The appointment of veteran diplomat Richard A. Clarke to direct the nation's cyber security acknowledges the obvious: Computer terrorism is a realistic threat. A well-planned computer assault can paralyze life in the United States more quickly than anything short of a nuclear attack.
NEWS
January 13, 2010
W hile Texans don't apologize for having oil reserves and Floridians aren't bashful about their warm weather and sunshine, Marylanders are seldom caught boasting about one of the state's most impressive resources - a veritable army of people who know how to spy in cyber space. The presence of the National Security Agency in Fort Meade has long been the least-talked-about jobs engine in the state's economy for obvious reasons. It's a government agency so secretive that neither its budget nor the size of its payroll is ever officially revealed.
NEWS
By Katie V. Jones, Baltimore Sun Media Group | February 24, 2014
It was about nine months ago, during Howard County's Business Appreciation Week, that County Executive Ken Ulman learned Columbia-based AirPatrol Corporation was thinking about relocating. Ulman's reaction was immediate, said Guy Levy-Yurista, chief technology officer for AirPatrol. Officials said the county executive worked with the Howard County Economic Development Authority to present options and expressed his desire to keep the firm in county. "Ken Ulman truly stepped forward," Levy-Yurista said.
NEWS
January 27, 2014
The effort to focus the post O'Malley era in Maryland on developing private sector businesses and jobs got a big boost Friday from the unprecedented joint agenda of House Speaker Michael E. Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller. It's encouraging that the two top leaders in the General Assembly are both focused on the issue at the same time that most of the candidates for governor next year are talking about the same thing and private sector advocacy groups like the Greater Baltimore Committee are pursuing similar efforts.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
In a public appearance in Baltimore on Thursday, National Security Agency director Keith Alexander forcefully defended surveillance methods that have come under scrutiny this year but acknowledged that some of them may need adjustments. Alexander, an Army general, said the NSA is looking for "better ways" to conduct its surveillance, but the agency based at Fort Meade has not been able to come up with such changes to its programs. "These were programs that were developed to defend this country," Alexander said in a talk hosted by the Baltimore Council on Foreign Affairs at the Hyatt Regency Hotel.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
First The New York Times; now the Canton Kayak Club? The website for the group of urban paddling enthusiasts was the victim of an apparent hacking Wednesday and Thursday, bearing an image of a man on a horse with a spear and the messages "NO WAR!" and "All Hail the Islamic world, we're here!" "We have no idea who did it nor why someone would hack our site," c lub Vice President Cliff Charland said. "It is obviously something we're not happy about. " The website had been restored to normal as of 3:30 p.m. Thursday.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 25, 2013
More than 100 people, including 63 students, attended an informational session at Battelle that included demonstrations about the growing field of cyber security. The interactive sessions April 18 included mobile forensics on android, cryptography, robotics and cyber-hygiene, which focused on strategies for staying safe and employable while using social media. The purpose of the event was to expose students to the possibilities of career opportunities in cyber security and it included a session on cyber degree programs and related careers.
NEWS
By Jonathan Coombes | April 11, 2013
We live in a world where almost everything we need to accomplish can be done online. Mobile phones and tablets allow us to work and play on the go. We shop online. We bank online. We store some of our most important personal details online. The other side, of course, is that we also live in a world where many of the networks we use to work and play online are increasingly vulnerable to attack by creative cyber criminals. A majority of Americans don't think twice about these issues when they log into a computer or use their mobile phone, but those of us in the security business know better.
NEWS
March 3, 2013
If there are nearly 20,000 cyber security jobs are available in the state of Maryland, why hasn't it been shouted from the roof tops ("Cyber help wanted," Feb. 27)? Most employment news we hear now is fairly dismal. With this many high-paying positions needing to be filled, the school system must take more notice. Baltimore's Digital Harbor High School, a marvelous place dedicated to technology and located right in Federal Hill, is one place to start. Recruiters from the National Security Agency, U.S. Cyber Command and other government and private agencies should stop by and encourage students to enroll in computer security programs and pursue degrees in the field.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley tapped a private-sector cyber security veteran to lead a push to promote that industry's job growth in the state, he announced in a visit to Hanover company KEYW Corp. Tuesday. Jeani Park will serve as Maryland's director of cyber development as the state works to woo more cyber firms and train more workers for the growing field. Park has worked in product strategy and marketing for companies including Hewlett Packard and Dell. "This is a huge new issue of national security," said O'Malley, referring to news reports of cyber attacks from China and elsewhere around the world.
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