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Cyber Attacks

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NEWS
June 13, 2012
Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger and the other leaders of Congress' intelligence committees this week issued a strong, bi-partisan statement of condemnation for recent leaks of classified information about America's clandestine operations abroad, including its cyber-warfare against Iran and drone strikes in Pakistan and Yemen. They promised new legislation to clamp down on leaks that they say can endanger Americans. Sen. John McCain went further, alleging that the Obama administration has engaged in a double standard on leaking — aggressively prosecuting low-level leakers while tolerating or even encouraging high-level leaks of information that could bolster the president's re-election prospects.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mike Denison, Capital News Service | March 16, 2014
High-profile cyber attacks on organizations such as Target and Neiman Marcus have drawn increased attention to the cybersecurity industry - an industry that continues to thrive in Maryland, and specifically in Howard County. Local cybersecurity experts who aim to thwart hackers say they are always being challenged, and at times seem to work from a disadvantage. "We have to be right 100 percent of the time," said Jim Close, federal account manager for Sourcefire, a Columbia-based network security company acquired by Cisco in October.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
A new computing facility at the National Security Agency will help the country better defend against cyber attacks , agency officials and members of Congress said Monday. The High Performance Computing Center-2 will assist in "front-line defense against immediate threats" in cyberspace, Gen. Keith B. Alexander, the director of the National Security Agency and head of U.S. Cyber Command, said during a groundbreaking ceremony Monday at Fort Meade. The 600,000-square-foot facility, similar in function to an existing computer center, is scheduled to open in 2016.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2013
In an industry with a lot of new competition, Belcamp-based SafeNet is a cybersecurity old hand: It's celebrating its 30th anniversary this year. To put that into context: SafeNet predates the World Wide Web. The company, founded with a focus on encryption, had a tumultuous past decade that included a stock options back-dating scandal while it was a publicly traded company. Now owned by a San Francisco firm that took it private in 2007, SafeNet says it protects nearly $1 trillion in transactions daily and has more than 25,000 customers, both government and commercial.
NEWS
July 14, 2009
Should the United States retaliate against North Korea for a series of cyber attacks on U.S. and South Korean computer networks this past week believe to have originated in North Korea? Yes 69% No 21% Not sure 10% (852 votes, results not scientific) Next poll: : Should the government launch an inquiry into whether former Vice President Dick Cheney ordered a CIA counter-terrorism program to be kept secret from congressional leaders in violation of the law? Vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
NEWS
June 11, 2012
If this was during President George W. Bush's term, there would have been no "question" about drone and cyber attacks (not to mention leaks by the White House). He would have been vilified by your paper ("The secret wars," June 8). And by the way, where is your editorial board on Attorney General Eric Holder'spathetic performance on the "Fast and Furious" fiasco? If John Ashcroft was attorney general, you would have been all over this - probably with at least two negative editorials by now. Lyle Rescott, Marriottsville
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley tapped a private-sector cyber security veteran to lead a push to promote that industry's job growth in the state, he announced in a visit to Hanover company KEYW Corp. Tuesday. Jeani Park will serve as Maryland's director of cyber development as the state works to woo more cyber firms and train more workers for the growing field. Park has worked in product strategy and marketing for companies including Hewlett Packard and Dell. "This is a huge new issue of national security," said O'Malley, referring to news reports of cyber attacks from China and elsewhere around the world.
NEWS
By Mike Denison, Capital News Service | March 16, 2014
High-profile cyber attacks on organizations such as Target and Neiman Marcus have drawn increased attention to the cybersecurity industry - an industry that continues to thrive in Maryland, and specifically in Howard County. Local cybersecurity experts who aim to thwart hackers say they are always being challenged, and at times seem to work from a disadvantage. "We have to be right 100 percent of the time," said Jim Close, federal account manager for Sourcefire, a Columbia-based network security company acquired by Cisco in October.
NEWS
By Henry F. Cooper | September 6, 2012
Recent reports suggest that the U.S. government was likely engaged in two very sophisticated cyber attacks: one that spied on Iran's nuclear program and another that slowed it by destroying centrifuges. These attacks encourage a twinge of national pride in our cyber capabilities. Yet there's a dark corollary to this news. Our enemies can use similarly sophisticated cyber tactics to attack the U.S. government and our private sector. Billions in intellectual property and state secrets are at risk, as well as the critical infrastructure that supports modern American life.
NEWS
March 12, 2013
Maryland has little idea how much it owes a mother, a lawmaker and a football player. Christine McComas, Del. Jon Cardin and Ray Rice of the Baltimore Ravens are the driving forces behind the proposed cyber bullying bill that will save teenagers' lives. As the founder of the national crusade, The Monster March Against Bullying, I've written the tragic obituaries of more than 100 bullied American teens who in the last three years have committed suicide. Four of them, 14-year-old Kenny Wolf, 17-year-old Aiden Schaeff, 18-year-old Zoe Hauser and 15-year-old Grace McComas, are Maryland kids.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
U.S. commerce "would grind to a halt in a matter of days" in the aftermath of a crippling cyberattack that the nation's ports — including Baltimore — are ill-prepared for, according to a new Brookings Institution report. But port officials here and elsewhere dispute the assessment written by Coast Guard Cmdr. Joseph Kramek, who spent a year as a Brookings fellow looking at cybersecurity at six of the nation's busiest waterfronts. The study concluded that failure to bolster defenses against hackers could lead to disruption of the computer networks used to move goods, fuel and food from ships to the marketplace.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
A new computing facility at the National Security Agency will help the country better defend against cyber attacks , agency officials and members of Congress said Monday. The High Performance Computing Center-2 will assist in "front-line defense against immediate threats" in cyberspace, Gen. Keith B. Alexander, the director of the National Security Agency and head of U.S. Cyber Command, said during a groundbreaking ceremony Monday at Fort Meade. The 600,000-square-foot facility, similar in function to an existing computer center, is scheduled to open in 2016.
NEWS
By Jonathan Coombes | April 11, 2013
We live in a world where almost everything we need to accomplish can be done online. Mobile phones and tablets allow us to work and play on the go. We shop online. We bank online. We store some of our most important personal details online. The other side, of course, is that we also live in a world where many of the networks we use to work and play online are increasingly vulnerable to attack by creative cyber criminals. A majority of Americans don't think twice about these issues when they log into a computer or use their mobile phone, but those of us in the security business know better.
NEWS
March 12, 2013
Maryland has little idea how much it owes a mother, a lawmaker and a football player. Christine McComas, Del. Jon Cardin and Ray Rice of the Baltimore Ravens are the driving forces behind the proposed cyber bullying bill that will save teenagers' lives. As the founder of the national crusade, The Monster March Against Bullying, I've written the tragic obituaries of more than 100 bullied American teens who in the last three years have committed suicide. Four of them, 14-year-old Kenny Wolf, 17-year-old Aiden Schaeff, 18-year-old Zoe Hauser and 15-year-old Grace McComas, are Maryland kids.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley tapped a private-sector cyber security veteran to lead a push to promote that industry's job growth in the state, he announced in a visit to Hanover company KEYW Corp. Tuesday. Jeani Park will serve as Maryland's director of cyber development as the state works to woo more cyber firms and train more workers for the growing field. Park has worked in product strategy and marketing for companies including Hewlett Packard and Dell. "This is a huge new issue of national security," said O'Malley, referring to news reports of cyber attacks from China and elsewhere around the world.
NEWS
By Henry F. Cooper | September 6, 2012
Recent reports suggest that the U.S. government was likely engaged in two very sophisticated cyber attacks: one that spied on Iran's nuclear program and another that slowed it by destroying centrifuges. These attacks encourage a twinge of national pride in our cyber capabilities. Yet there's a dark corollary to this news. Our enemies can use similarly sophisticated cyber tactics to attack the U.S. government and our private sector. Billions in intellectual property and state secrets are at risk, as well as the critical infrastructure that supports modern American life.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 23, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Warning that terrorists will increasingly try to target America with cyber viruses and chemical and biological weapons, President Clinton proposed a budget increase of $2.8 billion yesterday to protect computer networks, stockpile medicines and train emergency workers.His proposal represents a 40 percent increase in spending for computer security and a doubling of funding for chemical and biological defense from two years ago.Some experts say more should be spent on life-saving vaccines and less on training military and other emergency workers.
NEWS
By Jonathan Coombes | April 11, 2013
We live in a world where almost everything we need to accomplish can be done online. Mobile phones and tablets allow us to work and play on the go. We shop online. We bank online. We store some of our most important personal details online. The other side, of course, is that we also live in a world where many of the networks we use to work and play online are increasingly vulnerable to attack by creative cyber criminals. A majority of Americans don't think twice about these issues when they log into a computer or use their mobile phone, but those of us in the security business know better.
NEWS
June 13, 2012
Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger and the other leaders of Congress' intelligence committees this week issued a strong, bi-partisan statement of condemnation for recent leaks of classified information about America's clandestine operations abroad, including its cyber-warfare against Iran and drone strikes in Pakistan and Yemen. They promised new legislation to clamp down on leaks that they say can endanger Americans. Sen. John McCain went further, alleging that the Obama administration has engaged in a double standard on leaking — aggressively prosecuting low-level leakers while tolerating or even encouraging high-level leaks of information that could bolster the president's re-election prospects.
NEWS
June 11, 2012
If this was during President George W. Bush's term, there would have been no "question" about drone and cyber attacks (not to mention leaks by the White House). He would have been vilified by your paper ("The secret wars," June 8). And by the way, where is your editorial board on Attorney General Eric Holder'spathetic performance on the "Fast and Furious" fiasco? If John Ashcroft was attorney general, you would have been all over this - probably with at least two negative editorials by now. Lyle Rescott, Marriottsville
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