Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCutting Taxes
IN THE NEWS

Cutting Taxes

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2004
States and counties cutting taxes to boost job growth are likely undermining their own efforts, an economist argues in a new book - the latest salvo in a battle over the impact of taxes on economic development. Robert G. Lynch, author of the study and chairman of the economics department at Washington College in Chestertown, said he found little proof that tax breaks and incentives create jobs or encourage businesses to move from one state to another. The study was released today by the Economic Policy Institute in Washington, which focuses on the interests of low- and middle-income workers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
As early voting got underway Thursday in the primary race for governor, the four Republicans competing for the GOP nomination jockeyed to present themselves as the most qualified to take on a Democrat in November. The candidates taped a final televised forum in a Washington studio and, as they have in the past, largely agreed that tax cuts are in order after eight years under Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley. But the normally genial discussion among the Republicans was punctuated by each candidate trying to reinforce his credentials as the conservative most likely to succeed in a state where Democrats hold a 2-1 registration advantage.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 23, 1999
CONGRESSIONAL Republicans are struggling to pass a tax cut the economy doesn't need and taxpayers are not clamoring for. With President Clinton also proposing a $250-billion targeted cut, it's clear these proposals are nothing more than the candy politicians love to pass out before elections.The assumption underlying these proposals is that the federal government will realize a $3 trillion surplus over the next decade. While the economy has been performing extremely well for the past nine years, it is presumptuous to assume that the current recovery will last another 10 years.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Property taxes for Baltimore homeowners will drop again under Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's plan to gradually lower the city's rate to bring it more in line with the rest of the state. The city's spending panel agreed Wednesday to lower the rate to $2.13 per $100 of assessed value — still double the levy of surrounding counties, but down 14 cents in the past two years. The reduction is part of the mayor's plan to knock 20 cents off the tax for homeowners by 2020. The tax break, approved without discussion by the Board of Estimates, will lower the property tax bill for an average home by $174.
NEWS
August 29, 2002
ANOTHER PRESIDENT BUSH. Another mushrooming budget deficit. Another clamor from Democrats for an economic summit that would provide bipartisan cover for a deal to raise taxes -- or least forgo tax cuts that have not yet taken effect. At the former summer White House in Maine, fallout from the latest estimates of the widening gap between federal income and outgo must be invoking terrible memories of the 1990 economic summit. The resulting bargain took the first crucial step toward reversing three decades of red ink. But it cost George H.W. Bush his presidency.
NEWS
March 16, 1998
IN YOUR March 1 editorial, you warn that we should "go slow on cutting taxes." The reason we have a tax surplus is that we are overtaxed in the "Great Society" state of Maryland.Your worry that tax revenues might fall flat or decline is typical of your paper's Democratic tax-and-spend philosophy.If tax revenues decline, our legislators will have to do what every business or household does when cash flow is strained: cut spending. Not all government "programs" are vital to the well-being of Maryland citizens.
NEWS
By Drew Greenblatt | May 19, 2009
Hemorrhaging jobs - 5.6 million in a year - gets one focused on how we can stop this carnage. I was part of a blitz of 350 U.S. factory owners and managers who spent two days last week meeting with members of Congress to share with them some ideas on how we can reverse this trend and get back to growing manufacturing jobs in the United States. The U.S. manufacturing industry is still the biggest in the world; we want to keep it that way. Despite common misperception, our manufacturers ship more than China.
NEWS
March 27, 2005
Tired of the claims about cutting taxes I've read in these pages for a couple of weeks now, Howard County Republicans complain about the fact that the Democrats are now looking for ways to cut taxes. Frankly, I'm tired of it, and it's time to put some of this stuff to rest. It is claimed that if Democrats had been serious about cutting taxes, they should have passed Gail Bates' "Aging in Place" bill. Unfortunately, Ms. Bates' bill wasn't about true "aging in place." What it said was, "If you are a Howard County homeowner, and you are a certain age, you get a property tax cut."
NEWS
December 4, 1994
Getting the Shaft on Emissions TestsRegarding your Nov. 27 article on Maryland's new emissions program, the writer put forth the question as to whether the lack of opposition to the program is due to the population's willingness to do what's right for the environment or that it simply has not been well-informed about the program. While all concerned citizens are interested in the former, clearly the overwhelming silence is due to the latter.Some questions:* The dynamometer in your picture appears to have only one set of rollers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 5, 1997
In the tough years of the early 1990s, the states raised taxes that hit the poor harder than the affluent. Now that the booming economy has made the states flush with money, they are cutting taxes -- for the affluent.Sales and excise taxes, which fall more heavily on people at low income levels, were raised $11.7 billion from 1990 through 1993, data from the National Conference of State Legislatures show. These taxes have been cut by $200 million, or less than 2 percent of the amount of the increase, since 1994.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
Living near Baltimore County's Eastern Sanitary Landfill is no doubt unpleasant. The facility is huge - 375 acres - and handles about a quarter of Baltimore County's solid waste, or almost 75,000 tons of trash a year. Residents of the neighborhoods adjacent to it complain of unpredictable odors that substantially diminish their enjoyment of their property. But a proposal pending in the General Assembly to allow for property tax breaks for the affected communities is the wrong approach.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 27, 2014
If you needed proof of the political class' abiding support of the ruling class over the working class, look no further than the purportedly left-leaning blue state of Maryland, with a Democratic-dominated legislature throwing millions of dollars at the heirs of millionaires while hesitating about raising the wages of some of the poorest people in the state. With relative haste and limited debate, the state Senate, led by the well-to-do attorney and grandfather who serves as its president, voted 36-10 last week to raise the exemption on the Maryland estate tax, essentially creating a windfall for some of the wealthiest people in one of the wealthiest states in a country with an ever-widening wealth gap. If Gov. Martin O'Malley signs it into law, the measure would raise the amount of an estate exempt from Maryland's tax from $1 million to nearly $6 million.
NEWS
March 19, 2014
When Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake prepared her first city budget in 2010, she had to find a way to resolve a projected $190 deficit. In 2011, she faced another shortfall, this time $65 million. In 2012, the projected deficit was $48 million. Last year, it was $30 million. But now, for the first time since she took office, Mayor Rawlings-Blake is proposing a spending plan that includes no cuts to city services. Instead, it offers city workers a 2 percent raise - a far cry from the furloughs they experienced not long ago - and includes modest investments in a handful of priorities while continuing a long-term plan to cut property tax rates for homeowners.
NEWS
February 9, 2014
The last mayoral election in Baltimore featured a spirited debate about a variety of ideas for aggressive reductions in the city's sky-high property tax rate. The winning candidate, though, was the one who called those ideas unrealistic and advocated a gradualist approach that left the basic structure of the city's property tax system intact. To her credit, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has followed through and proposed a comprehensive 10-year financial plan to reduce costs, diversify revenue streams and cut property taxes.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | October 8, 2013
With frustration building over Washington's refusal to behave in the public interest, perhaps it's worth noting a drastic solution tried by the Irish. Last Friday, Irish voters cast ballots on a referendum to abolish the country's Upper House, known as the Seanad. Prime Minister Enda Kenny said Ireland didn't need all of its politicians and they should be made to suffer along with everyone else as the country continues to struggle economically. The measure to abolish the Seanad lost by just 42,500 votes out of more than 1,226,000 cast (51.8 percent to 48.2 percent)
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Baltimore has underbilled a downtown office tower owned by Orioles majority owner Peter G. Angelos by $390,000 in property taxes since 2011, government officials say - the most recent example of mistakes emerging from the city's Finance Department. Kevin Harris, a spokesman for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, called the billing on One Charles Center an isolated error. But a sampling of tax records shows that the city has also undercharged the owners of two other commercial properties by more than $300,000 in the past four years because of similar errors.
NEWS
October 3, 1995
THE REPUBLICAN juggernaut that came rolling out of the last election to take over Congress no longer looks invincible, thus confirming once again that zealotry and practical politics don't mix very well.Zealots in this case are ultra-conservatives in the House who actually believe they have been ordained by the voters to impose their "Contract with America" upon an electorate supposedly seething with tax-cut fever, anti-abortion sentiment and an overwhelming urge to shred the social welfare safety net.Their foes are not the Democrats, whose enmity can be taken for granted.
NEWS
March 5, 1994
THE CATO Institute, a conservative think-tank that believes the only good government is one that cuts taxes and spending simultaneously, has rated the nation's governors. Not surprisingly, our governor, William Donald Schaefer, gets an overall grade of C. Here's why:"Schaefer may have made the biggest mistake of his 40 years in public office two years ago when he rammed a major tax increase through the state legislature. That tax hike included higher income tax rates on the rich, a gas tax increase, an expanded sales tax, and a doubling of the cigarette tax."
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | August 6, 2013
I generally avoid trite devices like multiple-choice questions to frame a column. But I can't help myself this time, so please bear with me. Congressional Republicans rejected President Barack Obama's proposal last week to exchange a cut in corporate tax rates for an infrastructure-based jobs stimulus plan for which of the following reasons: (a) They know U.S. corporate tax rates aren't nearly as punitive for corporate America as they claim them to be; (b) They realize the 2009 stimulus worked and don't want to risk doing anything that might further improve the economy between now and the 2014 midterm elections; (c)
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
Baltimore's spending board voted Wednesday to approve another property tax break for city homeowners, part of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's plan to cut property taxes by 22 percent over 10 years. The tax credit approved by the Board of Estimates would knock $140 off the median property tax bill on owner-occupied homes. That is on top of the $40 cut that came when the panel created the credit last year. The numbers are based on the taxes that would be due on a property assessed at $200,000.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.