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NEWS
January 28, 2010
In response to Garrison Keillor's Jan. 27 commentary ("Don't knock elitism; it could save your life"): What a childish pout we have here, in explaining the Republican plan for health care as "let them die." I sincerely believe that the Democrats' proposed health care plan will cut nearly $500 billion from Medicare because that has been promised. That will most assuredly let someone die. I recently saw my first "comparative effectiveness" study. I was shocked to see the conclusion that Zocor would be preferred over Lipitor because the additional heart attacks with Zocor didn't cause so much lost work time as to cover the cost of the Lipitor!
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NEWS
October 13, 2014
I fully agree with commentator Ned Holstein's view that parenthood generally should be shared (" Joint custody should be the rule, not the exception," Oct. 8). As a father of two who fights for his children only because their mother wishes to control them, the courts all to often allow this to happen to great quality dads. Fathers are being cut out of our children's lives for the financial gain of others - mothers and their attorneys. Joe Phillips - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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NEWS
March 10, 2010
Community colleges are needed now more than ever to put people back to work, train employees in critical work force areas such as nursing and give high school graduates hope that they can receive a quality education that is affordable and accessible. The overwhelming majority of jobs in our "knowledge economy" require education beyond high school. Maryland's response to this reality includes a recent push to ensure that education is provided for people interested in careers that require more than a high school diploma but less than a four-year degree ("Not enough workers," March 2)
HEALTH
Michael Bodley and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Marlene MacGregor knew she was going to be a medical guinea pig, but she agreed anyway. Doctors at Medstar Union Memorial Hospital offered the 70-year-old Nottingham resident several options after a biopsy revealed she had Stage 1 breast cancer . After surgery to remove the tumor, she was told traditional radiation therapy - in which a patient goes through weeks of daily radiation treatment - was the tried and true method, with over 30 years...
NEWS
April 20, 2011
Recent articles on the FY12 budget debate have failed to recognize the incredible harm proposed cuts would have on low-income older Americans. The House Republican budget proposal would cut Medicaid spending by$1.4 trillion over 10 years. Right now, Medicaid pays for about 62 percent of the nation's total long-term care costs, and about 6 million seniors need long-term care. The proposal also would cut the Senior Community Service Employment Program by $150 million –on top of the $375 million just cut from the program in the FY11 budget.
NEWS
August 19, 2011
Dan Rodricks proposes to cut defense spending almost by half, but says he also wants our troops to have the technology they need. ("Austerity measures must apply to the Pentagon, too" Aug. 11). Like so many advocates of reckless defense cuts, he provides no specifics about how we could possibly accomplish these contradictory objectives. Defense spending didn't dig us into this hole and we shouldn't look to it to dig us out. Defense spending shrunk by more than half as a share of the budget since 1970, while spending on entitlements more than doubled.
NEWS
October 10, 2012
When I heard the news, I thought it was a joke. My alma mater, Towson University, has made an entirely irrational decision to drop both men's baseball and soccer programs ("Angry coach says officials kept quiet about folding team," Oct. 4). Apparently, there is a collegiate rule that strives for gender equality participation in sports, and there was some imbalance in the numbers of female athletes versus male athletes. Once again, political correctness rears its ugly head, and who loses?
NEWS
By Gene M. Ransom III | March 30, 2010
The congressional debate over reforming the nation's health care system is now complete. Yet, the challenge of quality care for our citizens is far from resolved. On Thursday, unless Congress acts, Maryland physicians and their colleagues across the nation will face an across-the-board cut of 21.2 percent to Medicare reimbursements, with more cuts expected to follow in the coming years. Given the current precarious state of the health care delivery system, a jolt of that magnitude would send it into shock.
NEWS
May 27, 2011
I am writing to speak up for amputees and persons with chronic limb impairment. Several states have taken the extreme steps of trying to modify Medicaid benefits so that the state would deny access to artificial limbs. I am asking you to keep this from happening in Maryland. Recent studies such as the "Prosthetic and Orthotic Adult Benefit" by the Colorado Department of Health Care Policy have concluded that providing this essential health benefit saves money by helping patients avoid costly co-morbid medical conditions.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III urged City Council members on Thursday to resist suggested budget cuts that he said would decimate his department and set back a decade of progress in reducing shootings and homicides. During a 45 minute presentation, Bealefeld railed against a budget process that department heads have said largely froze him out and instead relied on recommendations from the finance department. Bealefeld said the cuts were not grounded in reality, would violate a union contract, would devastate patrol operations and could prompt an exodus of officers and detectives beyond the 300 or so he estimated could be laid off. He noted that his department has cut overtime by $13 million since 2007 — from $31.6 million to $14.2 million, a 43 percent drop — and still reduced homicides to a three-decade low and dropped other crimes by greater amounts.
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz | October 3, 2014
The presidential election of 2012 and Maryland's gubernatorial election of 2014 have much in common rhetorically in terms of their approaches to issues and spin, the two key components of political persuasion. The 2012 presidential election pitted a likable African-American Democratic incumbent president against a white, older Republican who had been out of politics for years. The 2014 Maryland gubernatorial race features a likable incumbent African-American Democratic lieutenant governor against a white, older Republican who has been out of politics for years.
NEWS
October 3, 2014
A reader argues that overspending is the problem in Annapolis ( "Maryland's spending problem ," Sept. 29). This is a constant refrain, but then the inevitable question arises: Exactly what programs should be cut? Education? Then your kids will attend overcrowded classrooms. Transportation? Then roads will have more potholes and your commute will take longer. State inspectors? Then your food is more likely to be spoiled and your parents will be living in unsupervised retirement communities.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 2, 2014
Here's another thing: The attack ad on Larry Hogan that claims Anthony Brown's Republican challenger for governor wants to give a $300 million tax break to corporations at the expense of kindergartners - that's another stretch into the shady side by the Democrats, and for a couple of reasons. First of all, Hogan hasn't said any such thing yet, although, being a mainstream Republican businessman, he says he would cut Maryland's corporate tax rate, and we all know the story there: You can't be a Republican without saying you want to cut taxes.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The Ravens have re-signed veteran wide receiver Deonte Thompson to their practice squad and cut defensive tackle A.J. Pataiali'i. Thompson's practice squad salary will be more than the usual $6,300 per week, according to a source. Thompson cleared waivers Thursday, one day after being released for the second time in five days. He caught three touchdown passes during the preseason and 10 passes for 96 yards last season. Thompson is possibly the fastest player on the team with 4.21-second speed in the 40-yard dash.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Maryland is now facing a $405 million revenue shortfall over this year and next, largely the result of sluggish job growth, stagnant incomes and a weak housing market, state officials reported Wednesday. Five years after the official end of the recession, Maryland continues to confront fiscal trouble. This latest shortfall will force Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration and the General Assembly to make deeper cuts than previously expected to balance the state's roughly $40 billion budget.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
After the pain of Towson cutting its men's soccer program in March 2013 had subsided, Kay Banjo was faced with a life-changing decision: He could go pro and try out for Major League Soccer or finish his undergraduate degree and then use his final year of eligibility elsewhere. It was a no-brainer. "My dad has always been big on education, and I know I'm not going to play soccer my whole life, and I need to have something to fall back on," Banjo said. "I had one more semester to graduate.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
Sen. Ben Cardin sent a letter to Democratic Senate leaders Thursday expressing outrage over reports that a budget deal developing in Congress may include further cuts to the federal workforce -- the latest member of Maryland's delegation to push back on the possibilities of those cuts. Lawmakers in states with a high concentration of federal employees are reacting to rumors that negotiators are considering a 5.5 percentage point increase in how much federal employees would contribute toward retirement plans.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2010
Defense contractor Science Applications International Corp. said it is laying off about 35 people in its Aberdeen and Edgewood offices as part of a restructuring that will eliminate 60 jobs across the country. The cuts, to SAIC's Infrastructure, Logistics & Product Solutions Group, are "part of ongoing efforts to more strategically align business capabilities and achieve efficient, cost-effective business services to better serve customers," said spokeswoman Melissa Koskovich.
NEWS
September 12, 2014
The violent attack on Janay Palmer by Ray Rice was deplorable and shocking, and he deserves the price he is paying for his actions. Janay is the victim, and she deserves our sympathy and prayers. She does not deserve the pain and humiliation cast upon her by the public spectacle of turning in anything that says Rice for other NFL merchandise, jewelry store credit and even food ( "Remember the victim," Sept. 10). Cut up your Ray Rice football jersey and use it for cleaning cloths.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Emotional about Ray Rice's release and still stinging from a season-opening defeat, the Ravens play AFC North rival Pittsburgh Steelers in two days. The quick turnaround looms for the Ravens following a disappointing game Sunday in which they lost, 23-16, to the Cincinnati Bengals. The potential of falling into an 0-2 hole in the division makes the Steelers game a pivitol one for a team that just dismissed one of its top players. "It was a tough loss," veteran defensive end Chris Canty said.
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