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NEWS
April 18, 2012
Mitt Romney has been accused of revealing something in a hot-mike moment that perhaps he didn't want to reveal ("Dems: 'What's Mitt hiding?" April 17). I understand the desire on the part of the Democrats and The Sun to catch Mr. Romney in a similar "gotcha" moment to what President Barack Obama had during his meeting with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, but Governor Romney repeated several times in the early primary debates in front of millions of viewers, apparently none of then Democrats or Sun employees, that he would consider cutting departments but didn't have enough information to decide which ones.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan said Tuesday night that he would focus on controlling Maryland's spending before moving to roll back what he called the "40 consecutive tax increases" adopted under Gov. Martin O'Malley. Appearing at a Baltimore Sun Newsmaker Forum, Hogan told more than two dozen attendees reigning in the growth of government has to come before some of the ambitious tax-cutting plans advanced by his Republican opponents. "What we will first do is get spending under control," Hogan said, adding that spending has grown by $10 billion during O'Malley's two terms as governor.
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BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | November 30, 1990
DETROIT -- The top executive at General Motors Corp. announced further sweeping cuts yesterday in December's car and truck production and painted a bleak short-term outlook for the auto industry.Plummeting consumer confidence has undercut demand for cars and trucks, GM Chairman and Chief Executive officer Robert C. Stempel said. The cutbacks were needed, he said, to avoid being saddled with a glut of cars heading into an uncertain new year.The accelerated retrenchment will shut down a big part of GM's U.S. and Canadian operations for the rest of the year, although company officials said they didn't yet know how many thousands of workers would be laid off."
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Maryland's growth in personal income last year was one of the smallest in the nation, a regionwide problem as federal furloughs and other cutbacks pinched earnings, the Department of Commerce said Tuesday. Maryland saw a 1.6 percent increase last year in personal income, which includes wages, dividends, interest and other payments. That compares to a 2.6 percent increase nationwide. Only West Virginia, with 1.5 percent, saw less growth, according to the Commerce Department. Virginia (1.7 percent)
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | August 13, 1994
When Bell Atlantic Corp. announces details of its planned staff cutbacks Monday, employees hoping for a repeat of its 1992 job buyout offer are likely to be disappointed, a corporate executive said yesterday."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 17, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Navy has proposed slashing its current 452-vessel fleet to 340 ships and scaling back purchases of expensive next-generation attack aircraft in an effort to meet rapidly tightening budgetary restrictions in the post-Cold War world.The plan has been presented to Defense Secretary Les Aspin as part of the "bottom-up review" of U.S. defense strategy that he is conducting for the fiscal 1995 Pentagon budget.Mr. Aspin has not reacted to the Navy proposal and is not expected to decide on specific elements until the overall defense review is well under way. As part of the process, the Army and Air Force are slated to suggest new cutbacks of their own.The Navy plan would maintain the current 12 aircraft carriers but would eliminate more than 35 submarines between now and 1999, as well as make significant cuts in frigates, amphibious warfare ships and other vessels.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | December 12, 1990
One of the first swings of USF&G Corp.'s $75 million cost-cutting ax has fallen on its advertising budget, and two large local ad agencies are feeling the blow.VanSant Dugdale & Co., which has held the bulk of USF&G's reported $11 million advertising account for several decades, confirmed yesterday that its billings have been cut "significantly."And Richardson, Myers & Donofrio said the $3 million account for corporate public affairs and the annual USF&G Golf Classic it handled for the insurance company in New Orleans has been eliminated.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel * | May 29, 1991
Res MusicAmerica, a principal local presenter of contemporary music during the last 11 years, will not present a concert series next season because of cutbacks in private and government funding for the arts.The organization, which had an annual budget of about $40,000, found it "extremely difficult" to get corporate funding in the current recession, administrator Nancy Hoffman said yesterday. At the same time, Ms. Hoffman said, foundation and government support was declining. She cited a recent grant from the National Endowment for the Arts of $6,200, down from $10,000 the year before.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | December 19, 1991
General Motors has set off big signal flares with its announcement of a massive retrenchment that will reduce its work force by 71,000 employees in the United States and Canada over the next four years.In the immediate future, economists and employment experts say, it signals that the economic downturn could deepen and extend worldwide. "Companies in Germany and Japan and everywhere will see GM's cutback and realize that they have to cut back themselves," says Lester Korn, founder of an executive placement company.
NEWS
By James Bock and M. Dion Thompson Deborah I. Greene, Peter Jensen and Dennis O'Brien of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | October 2, 1991
The word from the streets and shopping malls is: Maryland's state troopers and medevac helicopters are the political equivalent of motherhood and apple pie.Gov. William Donald Schaefer's plan to lay off troopers and ground some medevac flights hit a nerve with a wide range of taxpayers interviewed yesterday. Many said they'd be willing to pay higher taxes to avoid such cutbacks."To me, when you talk about life-and-death services like the medevac helicopters, that's something that should be kept sacrosanct," said Robert Pace, an environmental consultant interviewed in Towson.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
The Maryland Center for Veterans Education and Training's Baltimore complex is full of neatly made beds and shining-clean floors, a military-like environment for homeless former service members working to get their lives back on track. Its executive director, a retired Navy lieutenant, would love to expand the nonprofit so he can take in families - children as well as their veteran parent. But as David T. Clements works to pin down new funding for that effort, he's worried about the money he's already got. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development recently warned the center to expect a cut in grant funding of more than 3.5 percent, which Clements said would hit late next year.
NEWS
By Maravene Loeschke | March 15, 2013
Recently, I announced with a heavy heart the discontinuation of men's soccer and baseball at Towson University. The decision was made after an extensive review following the initial recommendation from athletics leadership and the majority support of an independent task force charged to resolve three critical issues facing the university: long-term financial sustainability and affordability of the athletics budget; compliance with gender equity requirements...
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2012
Baltimore is among the regions hardest-hit by organized retail crime, a growing national problem in which gangs steal and sell goods, a retail trade group reported Tuesday. A survey by the National Retail Federation shows that almost no retailer is immune, whether the outlets are department or big-box stores, discounters, drugstores, supermarkets, restaurants or specialty chains. The crimes have also become more violent, the survey noted. "Criminals have become more desperate and brazen in their efforts, stopping at nothing to get their hands on large quantities of merchandise," Rich Mellor, NRF vice president of loss prevention, said in a statement.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 15, 2012
The Potomac River, which flows between Maryland and Virginia, was named the nation's "most endangered" waterway today by a Washington-based environmental group. American Rivers put the Potomac atop its annual list of endangered rivers.  Though cleaner than it used to be, the "nation's river," so named because it flows through Washington, D.C., still faces threats from urban and agricultural pollution, the group says, and from cutbacks being pushed in Congress of federal environmental regulations.
NEWS
April 18, 2012
Mitt Romney has been accused of revealing something in a hot-mike moment that perhaps he didn't want to reveal ("Dems: 'What's Mitt hiding?" April 17). I understand the desire on the part of the Democrats and The Sun to catch Mr. Romney in a similar "gotcha" moment to what President Barack Obama had during his meeting with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, but Governor Romney repeated several times in the early primary debates in front of millions of viewers, apparently none of then Democrats or Sun employees, that he would consider cutting departments but didn't have enough information to decide which ones.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 9, 2012
Maryland is on track to reduce climate-altering greenhouse gases 25 percent by the end of the decade, according to a state environmental official. In a preview of the state's overdue plan to curb emissions of carbon dioxide and methane, George S. "Tad" Aburn Jr., head of air management for the state Department of the Environment , told members of the House Environmental Matters Committee Wednesday that Maryland should exceed the goal set in a 2009 law if all 65 control programs laid out in the draft blueprint work as planned.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1995
Falling mortgage interest rates will make home buying more affordable in 1996, but don't look for a hefty boost to Maryland's housing market.The number of homes sold and built should just about keep pace with 1995, though economists' predictions vary. Some call for a slight increase as lower interest rates satisfy buyers' pent-up demand. Others expect housing activity to lag behind this year's, largely because of federal cutbacks that place Maryland in the bottom five states for job growth.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1991
Nearly 61 percent of callers to SUNDIAL say they plan to cut back on Christmas shopping this year, as opposed to 38 percent who do not plan on cutting back. The numbers, based on 341 calls, were 208 for cutbacks, 133 for no cutbacks."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically, as would be done in a scientific public opinion poll.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2011
Northrop Grumman Corp.'s plan to eliminate as many as 800 jobs — the second steep reduction for the Linthicum-based Electronic Systems division this year — could presage cutbacks by other federal contractors and further blows to the state's economy. Federal deficits — and a budget-cutting mood in Washington — have left Maryland companies less and less able to rely on government work, analysts said Thursday. Defense giants such as Northrop Grumman are particularly vulnerable, they said.
NEWS
October 1, 2011
Maryland's economy is heavily dependent on government spending, and the increasing pressure in Washington to rein in the nation's deficits is definitely cause for worry. According to a new report from the Census Bureau, Maryland's share of federal spending effectively remained flat between fiscal 2009 and fiscal 2010, posting so small a gain that it failed even to keep up with the modest rate of inflation. That's bad news, but it's hardly cause for panic. Maryland took in $96 billion in total federal payments in 2009.
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