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By Katherine D. Ramirez and Katherine D. Ramirez,Staff Writer | June 24, 1993
Fearful that deepening federal budget deficits will lead to higher taxes, about 50 students and faculty members gathered at the University of Maryland's College Park campus yesterday to demand fiscal responsibility from Congress and the White House and a drastic reduction in the deficit.The protest was organized by Lead. . .or Leave, a national grass-roots organization that wants to see a 50 percent cut in the annual federal budget deficit by 1996. A future generation of Americans will soon be paying the price for the government's overspending, rally participants said.
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NEWS
By Steve Chapman | August 20, 2004
CHICAGO -- The budget surplus is gone, federal spending is out of control, and the government is swimming in debt. But, to coin a phrase, help is on the way. George W. Bush and John Kerry both promise that in the next four years, they will cut this year's $445 billion federal budget deficit in half. To which serious students of the budget reply: Big, fat, hairy deal. The vow is only slightly more risky than promising that four years from now, everyone will be four years older. All the next president needs to do to cut the deficit in half, you see, is ... nothing.
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NEWS
January 23, 1992
Washington's favorite punching bag these days is the 1990 federal budget agreement, arguably the most creditable instrument of fiscal discipline our politicians have imposed on themselves in a long, long time. It has not forestalled a recession-fired spurt in the federal deficit to a new high of $362 billion. But without it, according to the Congressional Budget Office, the nation would be "in a much deeper hole."That being the case, our politicians should logically be celebrating the end of the Cold War and their consequent opportunity to slash military spending and cut the deficit.
BUSINESS
By Lorene Yue | March 14, 2004
To hear it from federal budget watchers, your golden years are on the verge of tarnishing. Reacting to the combination of the largest U.S. population group nearing retirement and a hefty deficit, Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan on Feb. 25 recommended cuts to Social Security and Medicare benefits for future retirees. It wasn't a popular suggestion, but it spotlighted the problems of government overspending. The White House has said the deficit in fiscal 2004, which ends Sept. 30, will total $521 billion.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | August 6, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Former Democratic presidential candidate Paul E. Tsongas and retiring Republican Sen. Warren B. Rudman endorsed a campaign yesterday to force all presidential and congressional candidates to sign a pledge to resign if the fiscal 1992 budget is not halved by 1996.The veteran deficit campaigners will launch their own bipartisan deficit-reduction movement next month, but yesterday they threw their political weight behind the pledge campaign being launched here by a group of young activists.
NEWS
By JEFF FAUX | February 21, 1993
At the end of his speech Wednesday night, President Clinton asked the audience to judge his plan not so much according to what's in it for "you and me" but according to what's in it for "us." That's certainly the better criterion. But before you can apply it, you have to decide what you think is most in the national interest.There are four major economic goals embedded in President Clinton's budget plan: deficit reduction, fairness of sacrifice, near-term job creation and long-term economic growth.
NEWS
January 25, 1995
Prey on the weakThe attempt of the Republican Congress to cut the deficit at the expense of so-called entitlements such as Social Security, Medicare and welfare makes one wonder how far we have become civilized, so to speak.My point is this. Have you ever observed how in Africa or Alaska, when big cats or wolves stalk a herd of animals, they try to cut out the old or weak to get a meal? It's what you call preying on the weakest.Certainly there is a similarity between this attempt to prey on the weakest in our society when there are more able-bodied places to cut costs.
NEWS
By GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE | March 14, 1993
Washington. -- "Balancing the budget," according to Ronald Reagan, that sage of the homespun one-liner, "is a little like protecting your virtue: You just have to learn to say 'No'."But it seems that being so negative doesn't come naturally to either presidents or national politicians. So, even as Congress wields the budget knife with more vigor than President Bill Clinton dared to suggest, one has to wonder just how successful the latest attempt to cut the deficit will be.A little history: The last time the federal budget was balanced was in 1969.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | February 15, 1993
A SENIOR official of the centrist Democratic Leadership Council recently lamented to me, "We thought we were voting for Bill Clinton, but we got a combination of Paul Tsongas and Ross Perot." By this, my commentator meant that Mr. Clinton, the supposed economic populist, was turning out to be a social liberal -- championing affirmative action, abortion rights, gay rights, environmentalism -- and that he might turn out to be a deficit-hawk, too.Mr. Clinton's social liberalism is fine with me, and it will even be fine with the voters -- as long as he gets the economy right.
NEWS
By Stephen E. Nordlinger and Stephen E. Nordlinger,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 31, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Congressional Budget Office came out yesterday with the government's first official estimates of the 1992 budget deficit, and the figures went all the way from $186 billion to $354 billion.What number is picked from that wide range depends, the CBO said, on what is counted in -- and out.The favorite choice of CBO Director Robert D. Reischauer, who appeared at a hearing of the House Budget Committee, was at the low end -- in keeping with the views of most economists.But panel members zeroed in at the top of the range as they fretted that all the anguish and political capital spent last fall to xTC reach a deficit-reduction package appeared to be coming to naught.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 26, 2003
ARLINGTON, Va. - Washington was buried under snow last week. That's nothing new for this town, which gets snow jobs year round from the politicians of both parties (and the independents, too). Democrats - and some Republicans - are wringing their hands over the Bush tax cuts and the administration's proposal to let their full impact take effect this year. The familiar laments are heard on the political streets, on some editorial pages and on television: "We can't afford it." "This is a sop to the rich."
NEWS
January 25, 1995
Prey on the weakThe attempt of the Republican Congress to cut the deficit at the expense of so-called entitlements such as Social Security, Medicare and welfare makes one wonder how far we have become civilized, so to speak.My point is this. Have you ever observed how in Africa or Alaska, when big cats or wolves stalk a herd of animals, they try to cut out the old or weak to get a meal? It's what you call preying on the weakest.Certainly there is a similarity between this attempt to prey on the weakest in our society when there are more able-bodied places to cut costs.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | February 15, 1994
Teresa Thacker is a mother of four. Her husband, Richard, is a carpenter. They live in public housing in Cockeysville. And every month they struggle to get by.Their story isn't remarkable. That's what makes it important. It's the story of typical people leading typical lives.And, at the same time, it's the story of the federal budget and what it can mean to ordinary folks."We live paycheck to paycheck," Teresa says. "At the end of each month, we pay off whatever is most pressing. A lot of times, we're paying turnoff notices.
NEWS
August 12, 1993
On the budget only rhetoric has changedThis paper constantly describes the deficit reduction bill with phrases like "the largest deficit reduction bill in history" and "necessary to reverse the budget gap created by the Reagan tax cuts."How short is your memory?Only three years ago, the "necessary" 1990 package (which allowed the deficit to grow by $50 billion) was designed to "cut" the deficit by $496 billion over five years mostly by trimming defense spending, raising taxes on the "rich," cutting $45 billion out of Medicare, capping some discretionary spending, taxing gas another nickel and depending on low interest rates to decrease payments on the debt.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | August 7, 1993
NEW YORK -- As President Clinton's deficit-cutting bill inched its way through the Senate toward final approval last night, Wall Street's legions of economic analysts and forecasters had already given it a near-unanimous thumbs-down.In interviews, newsletters, studies and faxes, many of the nation's top economists from business and finance expressed grave doubts about the plan to cut the deficit.While applauding the president for tackling the problem and for basing his plan on credible economic projections, most found the plan tax-heavy and content-light.
NEWS
By Alice M. Rivlin | June 25, 1993
I HAVE such a longstanding respect for Sen. Bob Dole that I fantasize the old Bob Dole -- the responsible statesman -- will weigh back into the budget debate.He was one of the first Republicans to recognize that the towering Reagan deficits endangered the health of the economy.Ignoring the political risk, he stood up to his own president, who offered supply-side nostrums, blithely talking about "growing out the deficits" and minimizing their size by basing projections on rosy scenarios.The old Bob Dole cut through the malarkey.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun Peter Osterlund of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | October 3, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Faced with election-year defections from his hard-won budget pact, President Bush warned Americans last night that if they do not insist on speedy congressional action to cut the deficit, they are risking their children's future and threatening the nation's survival."
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | August 20, 2004
CHICAGO -- The budget surplus is gone, federal spending is out of control, and the government is swimming in debt. But, to coin a phrase, help is on the way. George W. Bush and John Kerry both promise that in the next four years, they will cut this year's $445 billion federal budget deficit in half. To which serious students of the budget reply: Big, fat, hairy deal. The vow is only slightly more risky than promising that four years from now, everyone will be four years older. All the next president needs to do to cut the deficit in half, you see, is ... nothing.
NEWS
By Katherine D. Ramirez and Katherine D. Ramirez,Staff Writer | June 24, 1993
Fearful that deepening federal budget deficits will lead to higher taxes, about 50 students and faculty members gathered at the University of Maryland's College Park campus yesterday to demand fiscal responsibility from Congress and the White House and a drastic reduction in the deficit.The protest was organized by Lead. . .or Leave, a national grass-roots organization that wants to see a 50 percent cut in the annual federal budget deficit by 1996. A future generation of Americans will soon be paying the price for the government's overspending, rally participants said.
NEWS
By GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE | March 14, 1993
Washington. -- "Balancing the budget," according to Ronald Reagan, that sage of the homespun one-liner, "is a little like protecting your virtue: You just have to learn to say 'No'."But it seems that being so negative doesn't come naturally to either presidents or national politicians. So, even as Congress wields the budget knife with more vigor than President Bill Clinton dared to suggest, one has to wonder just how successful the latest attempt to cut the deficit will be.A little history: The last time the federal budget was balanced was in 1969.
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