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NEWS
February 20, 1991
* Gregory Thorne, 39, of Columbia, owner of a janitorial business inHoward County:I really don't know. You can't spend money if it'snot there. On the other hand, you can't let stuff go downhill. I live in Howard County; I've been here all my life. I don't want to pay taxes, but they'll probably have to raise taxes. I feel for the new county executive -- he's not going to make anybody happy. Ecker says he's not going to do this, not going to do that. But to keep up with growth, he's going to have to cut people's jobs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mark Newgent | January 16, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley released his fiscal year 2015 budget this week, and once again he made his long used but false claim that he has cut the state budget. The budget when Mr. O'Malley's first took office was $28.8 billion, according to the Department of Legislative Services; his latest proposal would spend $39.2 billion. The back of the envelope math tells us the budget has grown by $10.4 billion - an increase of roughly 36 percent. The legislature can cut from his proposal. Where are the cuts?
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NEWS
January 15, 2008
There's a standard question in opinion polling that asks people if they'd be willing to pay more in taxes if the money is spent on education. Typically, the vast majority say yes - as many as three out of four. And it's possible they're all now suffering a temporary bout of buyer's remorse. At least that's what Gov. Martin O'Malley's sinking approval numbers suggest. To describe Maryland residents as unhappy with their current governor is a rather sizable understatement. According to the Sun poll, his approval rating is hovering around a dismal 35 percent.
NEWS
By Joel Brinkley | September 18, 2013
The annual federal-budget fight is under way, and to reduce the deficit, Republicans want to slash Medicare, Social Security and other government services while delaying or killing the Affordable Care Act, which begins to take full effect next month. They're willing to devastate tens of millions of Americans. Still, as always, one government program that wastes hundreds of millions of dollars each and every year is certain to sail through Congress without question or qualm. That's the annual appropriation for the United States Agency for International Development's Afghanistan aid programs.
NEWS
By Pat O'Malley | October 10, 1991
Paul Rusko's personal services contract as county coordinator of physical education expired at noon yesterday, and it appears that his replacement will not be named any time soon.The Board of Education and School Superintendent Larry L. Lorton had hoped to name Rusko's successor by Sept. 30, but that deadline has been extended."The hiring freeze will continue, so that means no vacant positions are going to be filled in the immediate future," said Kenneth Nichols, administrative assistant to the superintendent.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | May 13, 1992
More than 1,000 Baltimore County residents opposed to cuts in services and government employees seeking to protect jobs and raises filled Loch Raven High School's auditorium last night for a noisy public hearing at which they urged the County Council not to cut the budget.They outnumbered a small but vocal group of countians protesting a proposed increase in the county's piggyback income tax to offset a budget cut.Carrying signs reading "Boo" and bolstered by a costumed biblical Moses carrying commandments against cuts in education, the crowd more than filled the 1,200-seat auditorium.
NEWS
September 2, 2008
Referendum's wording could mislead voters The wording of the ballot question relating to the constitutional amendment authorizing video lottery terminals may be misleading to voters ("Slots opponents drafting suit over ballot wording," Aug. 26). As drafted by the secretary of state, the wording of the ballot question states that the constitutional amendment would authorize the state to issue slots licenses "for the purpose of raising revenue for education of children in public schools," and goes on to describe a number of the various ways in which this money will be spent on education.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer Staff writer John W. Frece contributed to this article | November 17, 1992
An article in The Sun yesterday on a court ruling about cuts in welfare reported incorrectly the cost to the state of restoring General Public Assistance benefits for two months. The correct figure is about $2 million.The Sun regrets the error.A Baltimore Circuit Court judge ordered yesterday that recent cuts in welfare benefits be restored to approximately 23,000 disabled adults in Maryland.The plaintiffs' lawyer said the ruling was a victory for the six welfare clients who sued the state last month, charging that its recent budget cuts were unconstitutional.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | May 13, 1992
More than 1,000 Baltimore County residents opposed to cuts in services and government employees seeking to protect jobs and raises filled Loch Raven High School's auditorium last night for a noisy public hearing at which they urged the County Council not to cut the budget.They outnumbered a small but vocal group of countians protesting a proposed increase in the county's piggyback income tax to offset a budget cut.Carrying signs reading "Boo" and bolstered by a costumed biblical Moses carrying commandments against cuts in education, the crowd filled the 1,200-seat auditorium to overflowing.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2001
County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger likely will not get the $20 million in cuts he is seeking in next year's education budget, the president of the Baltimore County Board of Education has warned. "We have researched it, and this is what we need," board President Donald L. Arnold said this week, adding that members will discuss the issue at a meeting Tuesday. A decision by the board to support the $803 million budget - a $77 million increase over this year - would be a bold show of support for schools Superintendent Joe A. Hairston.
NEWS
August 7, 2013
The Pentagon budget is bankrupting this country, and U.S. warriors are wreaking havoc all over the Middle East ("Pentagon leaders caution Congress over budget cuts," Aug. 2). The blow-back has been phenomenal. But instead of the GOP calling for major cuts in the military budget in order to fund a major rebuilding of the country's infrastructure, it is continuing its blatant attack on the poor. If we did not have a Congress beholden to military contractors, the bloated military budget would be severely cut. Then the savings would be used in our communities to salvage the bridges, the roads, schools, recreation centers and other urban infrastructure.
NEWS
By Maureen Black and David Paige | May 12, 2011
Congress' recent efforts to balance the federal budget give new meaning to "women and children first. " The $500 million cut to the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) that President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans agreed to as part of last month's budget deal pushes the nation's fiscal concerns onto the shoulders of babies. Because WIC actually reduces health care costs, it is not clear why it has been targeted for cuts. Economic analysis from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN | March 26, 2009
There was a time right here in Baltimore when police didn't worry about money. For an entire summer, cops spent $300,000 a week in overtime to put two officers in every patrol car. City officers got the highest pay raise in their history - $30 million over three years, boosting one of the state's lowest-paying agencies to parity with the suburbs. The mayor got a standing ovation in the union hall. It was 2000 and 2001, before the attacks of Sept. 11 that would bring a flood of federal dollars into Baltimore, and before people moved back to the city, helping fill long-suffering tax coffers.
NEWS
September 2, 2008
Referendum's wording could mislead voters The wording of the ballot question relating to the constitutional amendment authorizing video lottery terminals may be misleading to voters ("Slots opponents drafting suit over ballot wording," Aug. 26). As drafted by the secretary of state, the wording of the ballot question states that the constitutional amendment would authorize the state to issue slots licenses "for the purpose of raising revenue for education of children in public schools," and goes on to describe a number of the various ways in which this money will be spent on education.
NEWS
January 15, 2008
There's a standard question in opinion polling that asks people if they'd be willing to pay more in taxes if the money is spent on education. Typically, the vast majority say yes - as many as three out of four. And it's possible they're all now suffering a temporary bout of buyer's remorse. At least that's what Gov. Martin O'Malley's sinking approval numbers suggest. To describe Maryland residents as unhappy with their current governor is a rather sizable understatement. According to the Sun poll, his approval rating is hovering around a dismal 35 percent.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2004
If you imagine the battle over the Maryland budget as a game of chess, you'd have seen a knight charge this town last week, his sword aimed low. Since Republican Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. unveiled his budget, surprising everybody by adding new programs rather than making deep cuts, I have been wondering who would do the dirty work. In case you forgot, the budget in Maryland has to be balanced. The governor is king. He suggests how to spend and the General Assembly can only cut. And if nobody here raises taxes this session, or comes up with another revenue source (slot machines?
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2000
Facing an embarrassment of budget riches, Democratic leaders of the General Assembly are warming to the idea of a tax cut this year. Leaders in the Senate and House of Delegates said yesterday that they would support accelerating the 10 percent income tax cut enacted in 1997 and scheduled to take full effect in 2002. More than half of that cut, 6 percent, has gone into effect. One idea is to have the Assembly make the full 10 percent reduction effective this year, two years early, saving Maryland taxpayers an estimated $310 million over the next two years.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | January 23, 1992
Crofton voters failed to turn out in sufficient numbers Wednesday night to vote on a proposed budget for the special tax district, which means that board members will have to cut $18,000 from the 1993 spending plan.Because the proposed $550,784 budget exceeds a 5 percentincrease cap, the special tax district's bylaws require that it be approved by the general membership. But only about 50 voters turned upfor the meeting, 25 shy of a quorum. The proposed budget would have increased spending 8.6 percent.
NEWS
March 23, 2003
Tax credits spur efforts to revive communities Thank you for The Sun's well-written editorial on the Maryland historic rehabilitation tax credit program ("Summer reading," March 17). While Maryland is, without a doubt, experiencing severe budget problems, lawmakers should not cut this program. I recently received reimbursement for the renovations to my more-than-200-year-old home in Mount Vernon. Without this program, I would not have been able to undertake such a project. Furthermore, I would not have had the guidance and incentives to keep the rehabilitation respectful of our community's history.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2002
Maryland's newest state lawmakers, still aglow from their election victories, converged on the State House in Annapolis yesterday, affixed large name tags to their lapels and promptly got their first lesson in budget cutting. Their orientation, they were told, was being curtailed in order to save money. Four years ago, freshman orientation was a three-day affair, followed by a six-day bus tour of the state. This time around it's down to two days, and the tour is cut in half. So the information is tightly packed.
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