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By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | March 8, 1992
The next time you say it with flowers, include a bottle of mouthwash.A capful of mouthwash to a quart of water is one home remedy that keeps flowers alive longer. Equal parts 7-Up and warm water, with a dash of Clorox, is another recipe for flourishing flowers.Folk tales abound about what makes cut flowers last longer. And Bob Brown, program director for the retail floristry curriculum at Dundalk and Catonsville Community Colleges, says he's heard them all. Aspirins, pennies and birth control pills are just a few of the remedies that don't work.
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Jacques Kelly | June 13, 2014
On a drive along Cromwell Bridge Road east of Towson, you'll notice a classic white barn surrounded by a stretch of wooden fencing. Follow the entry drive at Cromwell Valley Park and you'll encounter a modest green sign marked Talmar. Talmar stands for Therapeutic Alternatives of Maryland. It's a nonprofit therapy center where participants get their hands a little dirty during a day's work. Its home is a handful of acres containing rows of flower beds and greenhouses and a 50-hen chicken coop.
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By ELIZABETH LARGE | October 22, 2006
846 W. 36th St., Hampden 410-889-4025 botani846.com Like other Hampden shops, Botani is a classic example of Baltimore chic. That means in spite of its exotic name (pronounced botany), it has an old-fashioned, almost frumpy charm. The plants, cut flowers and gifts are anything but. All three of the owners were at Whole Foods before they decided to open their own store, and the same eco-philosophy is at work here. There are unusual plants like Madagascar palms and button ferns. Cut flowers range from what's in season and traditional (such as chrysanthemums)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 8, 2011
Joseph L. Radebaugh Sr., an owner of a family-owned florist and greenhouse business who served customers for more than 65 years, died of congestive heart failure July 3 at his Towson home. He was 88. Mr. Radebaugh was born on a family farm at Stevenson Lane and Bellona Avenue. Before his graduation from Towson High School in 1940, he helped his father and brothers sell fruit and vegetables as well as the cut flowers they grew. An athlete, he played for Towson's basketball, soccer and baseball teams.
NEWS
December 4, 2005
STORE OPENING GREEN FIELDS 5424 Falls Road, Baltimore / / 410-323-3444 Good news for gardeners. Green Fields at Falls Road and Northern Parkway has almost finished a major renovation. It doubles the interior size of the nursery, adds a pavilion with more climate control, and creates a layout that's easier to navigate. When everything is done in mid-January, Green Fields will be more of a garden center, selling not only plants and fertilizer, but also garden tools, books, gift items and even cut flowers.
NEWS
March 8, 1992
Agriculture is changing in the county and across Maryland as producers branch out to meet the market's needs, Cooperative Extension Service agent Thomas Ford said Wednesday."
NEWS
By Linda Hanson and Linda Hanson,Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 15, 2001
It's all Martha's fault. There Martha Stewart is in her magazine, strolling through dew-kissed gardens, snipping flowers that she artfully arranges in lush bouquets. Who wouldn't want to have a cut-flower garden after seeing that? She makes it look easy, but here's what you need to know before getting started. It's important to carefully select your garden's location. Many of the flowers that are good for cutting like sunlight, so find a site that gets at least six hours of sun a day. Moist, well-drained soil usually works best.
NEWS
By Eric Slater and Eric Slater,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 18, 1999
ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- "Oh, thank you" she exclaims, clutching the bouquet of roses. "They're beautiful." And then she holds them out for you to smell.This is the problem, the smelling. This is the genesis of the uncomfortable little lie. Because, sniff as you will, you cannot smell a thing -- certainly nothing more florally fragrant than your weed-filled yard. And you didn't pay $79 for the weeds. So you fib."Mmmmm," you nod. "Smells nice."In an effort to satisfy the American taste for things bigger, brighter and longer-lasting, breeders of cut flowers have produced specimens with perfectly giant buds, eye-searing colors and the ability to survive in a vase for weeks.
NEWS
June 19, 2005
Farmers can sign up for cover crop program The Maryland Department of Agriculture is taking sign-ups for the 2005 Winter Cover Crop Program through July 15. Farmers who plant cover crops this fall may apply to help reduce soil erosion and protect water quality in the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. The cost-share assistance program pays up to $50 an acre. Information: 410-848-2780. Flower tour, conference scheduled for July 14 The University of Maryland Cooperative Extension will co-sponsor a Summer Evening Cut Flower Conference and Tour from 3:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. July 14 at Triadelphia Farm in western Howard County.
NEWS
By Ray Moseley and Ray Moseley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 21, 1998
AALSMEER, The Netherlands -- Long before the sun comes up, Jacques Pannekoek leaves his home about 20 miles north of Amsterdam to begin a 12-hour workday that could end with Dutch flowers sitting on some Chicago tables by nightfall.He is a flower buyer and exporter, and Aalsmeer, a village near Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport where he works, is the undisputed flower capital of the world. It is "the New York Stock Exchange for flowers," in the words of Adrienne Lansbergen, a spokeswoman for Bloemenveiling Aalsmeer -- the Aalsmeer Flower Auction.
NEWS
By Jenny Hopkinson and Jenny Hopkinson,sun reporter | June 15, 2007
The smell of strawberries was strong on Allegheny Avenue yesterday. Farther down the block, past the fresh bread, summer squash and cut flowers, a grill was fired up in preparation for the lunch crowd. However, at the opening day of the Towson Farmers' Market, not all of the treats were for people. Lisa Lindsey-Davis stood behind her table, selling all-natural dog biscuits in vegetable and peanut butter-oatmeal flavors. "Its something good for the pups out there," she said. Lindsey-Davis' stand was among the new sights at the Farmers' Market, which started its 28th season yesterday in the Baltimore County seat.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | October 22, 2006
846 W. 36th St., Hampden 410-889-4025 botani846.com Like other Hampden shops, Botani is a classic example of Baltimore chic. That means in spite of its exotic name (pronounced botany), it has an old-fashioned, almost frumpy charm. The plants, cut flowers and gifts are anything but. All three of the owners were at Whole Foods before they decided to open their own store, and the same eco-philosophy is at work here. There are unusual plants like Madagascar palms and button ferns. Cut flowers range from what's in season and traditional (such as chrysanthemums)
NEWS
December 4, 2005
STORE OPENING GREEN FIELDS 5424 Falls Road, Baltimore / / 410-323-3444 Good news for gardeners. Green Fields at Falls Road and Northern Parkway has almost finished a major renovation. It doubles the interior size of the nursery, adds a pavilion with more climate control, and creates a layout that's easier to navigate. When everything is done in mid-January, Green Fields will be more of a garden center, selling not only plants and fertilizer, but also garden tools, books, gift items and even cut flowers.
NEWS
June 19, 2005
Farmers can sign up for cover crop program The Maryland Department of Agriculture is taking sign-ups for the 2005 Winter Cover Crop Program through July 15. Farmers who plant cover crops this fall may apply to help reduce soil erosion and protect water quality in the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. The cost-share assistance program pays up to $50 an acre. Information: 410-848-2780. Flower tour, conference scheduled for July 14 The University of Maryland Cooperative Extension will co-sponsor a Summer Evening Cut Flower Conference and Tour from 3:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. July 14 at Triadelphia Farm in western Howard County.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | March 16, 2003
On St. Patrick's Day, everybody -- regardless of national heritage -- is Irish. We sport moth-eaten green sweaters, quaff green liquids, and wolf green eggs and ham. But the plunge into verdure is not so much yearning for the "old sod" as a yearning for any sod. We're sick of winter and pine for a bit o' the green, even if it's only woolens and weird food. But what we really want is a renewed connection with growing things, which is why Bells of Ireland, tall-stemmed and densely packed with emerald green flowers, are so popular.
NEWS
By Denise Cowie and By Denise Cowie,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 16, 2003
Dispirited by the frigid temperatures? Desperate for spring? Try this antidote to the winter blues: tulips. Check out almost any florist, garden center or even supermarket right now, and you're likely to see these cheerful blossoms in cut-flower bouquets or growing in pots. January through April is prime season for such potted bulbs as tulips, hyacinths and daffodils, which are forced into bloom early to please the winter-weary. It's easy to see their appeal. Just look out a window anywhere there's a pot of colorful tulips sitting on the sill.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff writer | February 12, 1992
With Valentine's Day only two days away, some cash-conscious romantics may be wondering whether they should shell out $50 or more for thetraditional dozen long-stemmed roses.Aurora Florist on Crain Highway has some ideas for lovers who are long on romance but short on cash.For two-thirds the cost of a dozen roses, Aurora customers can buy "Romeo Roses," a combination of carnations and roses, said manager Phil Bendt."It's the same effect, the same look," said Bendt, butthe less expensive carnations keep the cost down.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 8, 2011
Joseph L. Radebaugh Sr., an owner of a family-owned florist and greenhouse business who served customers for more than 65 years, died of congestive heart failure July 3 at his Towson home. He was 88. Mr. Radebaugh was born on a family farm at Stevenson Lane and Bellona Avenue. Before his graduation from Towson High School in 1940, he helped his father and brothers sell fruit and vegetables as well as the cut flowers they grew. An athlete, he played for Towson's basketball, soccer and baseball teams.
NEWS
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 2, 2002
Like divas of the plant world, roses conjure up both lust and despair. No other flower can claim to have made so many swoon. Or to have left so many with a shelf full of chemicals in the garage and sulking plants in the garden. If you've been turned off by the labor-intensive regimen of roses in the past -- the spraying, the bugs and the black spot -- you'll be heartened to learn that new, improved varieties today make roses more of a friend than foe. "Nobody should waste their time spraying roses," says Frank Gouin, professor emeritus of horticulture and landscape architecture at the University of Maryland.
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