Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCut Costs
IN THE NEWS

Cut Costs

NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2002
The Columbia Foundation's winter grants to 31 nonprofits for 2003 came with a caveat: Cut your costs, and rethink your new programs. Unless there is an undeniable need in the community, "it's not a good time in today's environment to be starting a new project," said Barbara K. Lawson, foundation president and chief executive officer. This month, the group awarded $188,500 in operating grants ranging from $2,000 to $16,000 to support Howard County charitable organizations struggling because of the economic downturn.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | November 7, 2001
THE layoff became corporate America's favorite cost-cutting act in the 1990s, a tactic so popular on Wall Street that companies would exaggerate the extent of their firings to boost share prices. The downside of downsizing, however, eventually made business executives pause and reflect. Not out of concern for people who lost their jobs. Are you kidding? Out of concern for shareholders and profits. When the economy went on the boil late last decade, the problem for many companies became too few workers, not too many.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | December 27, 2001
Employing a tactic used to fight crime, Baltimore school officials plan to begin next month tracking the city system's performance - including dropout rates, teacher and student attendance, suspensions and expulsions, and the time it takes to process bills. The approach -- dubbed SchoolStat - follows Mayor Martin O'Malley's signature method for ensuring that government services are delivered efficiently, CitiStat. It has spawned a slew of spin-offs, including HousingStat, LeadStat, DrugStat and KidStat.
NEWS
By Ronnie Greene and John B. O'Donnell and Ronnie Greene and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1997
As federal housing auditors promised a review of Baltimore's $300 million rebuilding campaign yesterday, the head of a city loan agency that finances some of the work vowed to cut costs."
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2003
A smaller US Airways emerged yesterday from bankruptcy with $1.24 billion in new financing and its chief executive pledging to continue looking for ways to cut costs and boost revenue. "This legal process is done, but we're going to lose money this year and this war brings out a lot of uncertainty, and so we're going to have to continue to adapt and refine our business model," said David N. Siegel, the carrier's chief executive. The Arlington, Va.-based airline, which cut expenses by $1.9 billion annually while in bankruptcy protection, hopes to further cut costs in light of reduced business.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1993
Dole Food lays off 400 in Calif.Dole Food Co.'s cost-cutting ax fell on 400 workers at its Bakersfield, Calif., carrot plant, who will lose jobs as processing and packing are consolidated at two other plants. Dole has undertaken a worldwide reorganization it hopes will cut costs by more than $100 million.Weinberger is Forbes chairmanForbes magazine Publisher Caspar Weinberger, the former defense secretary, has been named chairman, the company announced yesterday.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The child born to Virginia Leigh Fallon of Petaluma, Calif., entered the world last year with heart and breathing problems, and after an extraordinarily difficult labor that ended only when doctors performed a Caesarean section.Yet three days after the birth, the hospital -- under pressure to hold down costs -- discharged mother and son, even though baby Jesse had been diagnosed with a heart murmur and Ms. Fallon was, in her words, "in continuous pain."Several days later, Ms. Fallon told a Senate committee yesterday, Jesse was rushed to the hospital, where emergency heart surgery failed to save the boy's life.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | August 29, 2007
Next month, Hedwin Corp. will shut down its Indiana factory and lay off 60 employees. Seems like another story of greedy shareholders, foreign imports and good American manufacturing jobs moved offshore. Except there aren't any greedy shareholders. Foreign imports aren't a problem. And the jobs aren't moving to Shanghai. They're going to Baltimore: Hedwin is filling 40 positions here. Sometimes the brush portraying U.S. manufacturing as a victim of cut-rate imports and stock-option-gobbling CEOs gets swept too broadly.
BUSINESS
By Journal of Commerce | August 7, 1991
Volvo Cars of North America in October will slash its U.S. entry ports from 10 to four to speed handling and cut costs, starting with the 1992 model year. Baltimore would be one of the ports cut out.All Volvos will be imported through either Halifax, Nova Scotia; Newark, N.J.; Jacksonville, Fla.; or Wilmington, Calif., in Los Angeles harbor.Cut out of the Volvo distribution network once 1991 model inventories are -- besides Baltimore -- Portsmouth, Va.; Houston; Richmond, Calif.; Portland, Ore.; and Vancouver, British Columbia.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,Sun Staff Writer | August 1, 1995
In an effort to cut costs and improve service, NationsBank is planning to place an indefinite number of tellers and other employees who deal with consumers on part-time status.The company, in an announcement to employees due today, also is expected to reschedule the work hours of tellers and other consumer representatives.The goal is to have more employees working during peak hours and fewer during slower times of the day, said John Riggin, a NationsBank spokesman.Mr. Riggin said fewer than a dozen employees will lose their jobs.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.