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By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 2005
Is it a bad idea to cut back perennials while the leaves are green? Are the plants still benefiting this late in the year? I want to use the green leaves on my compost pile as "greens." If I wait until the leaves turn brown and compost them, do they still provide nitrogen to the compost pile? This late in the season, you can cut back your perennials for use in your compost pile. If you wait until the foliage browns, they will not provide the nitrogen or "green" source that you desire for your compost pile.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. said 640,000 customers earned a credit on their bills last week for cutting back on electricity, the biggest test of a fledgling program aimed at reducing demand on hot days. The "Energy Savings Day" on Wednesday — part of BGE's voluntary Smart Energy Rewards program — earned people who bumped up their thermostats or made other changes an average of $6.80. It was the first such savings day of the summer. Dan Benner, an art director who lives in Annapolis, unplugged his power strips, turned off the lights, set his thermostat to 80 degrees and left for work.
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NEWS
December 6, 1993
Black & Decker Corp. has announced it will cut back operations at its Hampstead distribution center starting in 1995.The reduction will coincide with the opening of a new distribution plant in South Carolina.A spokeswoman for Black & Decker said the Hampstead distribution center, which has slightly more than 100 employees, will remain in full operation through 1994.The entire Hampstead plant employs between 700 and 800 people now, most of them in production, and they were notified of the cutback Thursday evening.
NEWS
July 22, 2014
I read the article, "Md. health agency cutting inspections (July 20), with dismay. My parents were in a beautiful assisted living facility in Anne Arundel County. We noticed many unsettling events and brought them to the attention of the facility's director and owner. Promises were made but improvements were not and things were going steadily downhill. After several months, we noticed that the stairwell doors were locked with furniture stored in the stairwells. I called the Anne Arundel Fire Inspector and asked how often the facilities were inspected.
BUSINESS
By Michael Enright and Michael Enright,Special to The Sun | November 5, 1990
Gone are the confident chatter and the exuberance that once marked the opening of local Chamber of Commerce meetings. Today members speak in low murmurs, and their faces, over steaming cups of coffee, look tired.Housing starts, retail sales, quarterly financial reports -- it seems every day brings another disastrous economic sign, as analysts proclaim that the nation is either on the brink, or in the midst, of a recession.And small- to midsized businesses, with razor-thin profit margins and limited cash reserves, feel the sharp pinch first.
SPORTS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 26, 1996
TEMPE, Ariz. -- California Angels designated hitter Chili Davis reported to camp yesterday -- nine days after he was asked to.Said Davis, 36, whose arrival was delayed by personal business: "I took up a new hobby, mountain biking. I gave up cigarettes and dipping and cut back on my alcohol intake. . . . Why? I'm getting old."
NEWS
August 16, 1993
THE latest health reports say it's good to cut back. Our bodies can benefit from cutting back on fat, calorie and cholesterol intake, but if we cut back too much we will lose muscle in addition to unwanted fat.It seems that American institutions for higher learning have been forced to cut back, too -- to retain their fiscal health. Since the recession began, they have been reducing enrollment as well as faculty -- so much so that the cutbacks could could be affecting the muscles of universities.
BUSINESS
By David Conn | December 11, 1991
The Baltimore and Maryland job markets will deteriorate in the first quarter of next year, with more employers planning to reduce their staff than those planning to hire, a new survey shows.In Baltimore, only 5 percent of the employers surveyed by Manpower Inc., an international temporary employment firm, said they planned to increase their work force next quarter, while 16 percent said they would cut back.The statewide employment picture was a bit less negative. Of about 1,760 employers questioned over the telephone, 17 percent planned a decrease in staffing and 12 percent planned to hire.
NEWS
March 4, 2002
Flat job market expected in spring, company's poll finds Job seekers in the Annapolis area will find a flat market this spring, according to survey by Manpower Inc., a national personnel company with an office in Annapolis. Of the Annapolis-area companies that responded to the Second Quarter Employment Outlook Survey, 3 percent will recruit more workers during April, May and June, 3 percent will cut back and 94 percent said they anticipate no changes. The same period last year, a third of the companies anticipated adding staff and 3 percent planned to cut back.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | June 27, 1992
CHICAGO -- It became known as the shrub that ate the sidewalk, the evergreen yew that had grown so prolifically that tips of its foliage brushed against pedestrians walking single file.Trimming it back to where it was no longer a nuisance would leave an ugly view into the inner branches of the bush. To try to shear it into shape gradually would take years of careful pruning. To remove the bush would be a huge chore and would leave a gaping hole in this corner lot's landscape."You can trim back a yew 50 percent and expect pretty good regrowth if there are enough dormant buds on the inner branches," says Greg Stack, University of Illinois Cooperative Extension adviser for Cook County, Ill. "Most people are more timid than they should be and don't cut back far enough.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
The Maryland health agency responsible for overseeing medical facilities, including the group home where a disabled foster child died this month, is moving to reduce the number of facilities it inspects across the state - even as it acknowledges that thousands of complaints and inspections have not been properly handled. The Office of Health Care Quality says the policy change stems in part from a long-standing, and growing, problem: a shortage of inspectors. The agency proposes to cede some oversight to accrediting organizations while focusing its inspections on facilities with a history of serious problems.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
Maryland's economy has grown almost without fail in the last quarter-century, ticking up year after year. But not in 2013. That's according to early estimates from the U.S. Department of Commerce, which showed Maryland's gross domestic product stagnating last year - putting the state near the bottom of the national pack. Only the District of Columbia and Alaska fared worse. It's another indication that 2013 wasn't great for Maryland, where federal budget cuts had an outsized effect because of the state's big cluster of federal contractors and agencies.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
" The Onion " took a jab at Baltimore's long struggle with drugs in a story this week. The satiric site reported that Oriole Park at Camden Yards would no longer sell crack after the seventh inning. “From now on, fans who have been hitting the pipe all afternoon can take a bit of a breather to come down and stop tweaking out long enough to stagger home safely," the site quotes a stadium official as saying. "That's what Orioles baseball is all about.” The story concludes by saying that stadium workers "would continue to check IDs for everyone seeking to purchase crack, noting that - per Baltimore city regulations - sales of the drug are prohibited to anyone 14 years of age or younger.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
When Samantha Kuczynski contemplated the biggest dietary problem in her lunch recently, she didn't point to the chicken wrap sandwich or the french fries. It was the dollop of ketchup that caught the eye of the 24-year-old Center Stage props artisan, who was eating outside recently. The World Health Organization has identified "hidden" sugars in processed foods as a major threat to people's weight and teeth - the condiment contains about a teaspoon of sugar in every tablespoon - and the agency proposed earlier this month that people limit the sweetener to just six teaspoons daily.
HEALTH
By Shanti Lewis, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. The latest post is from Shanti Lewis, a registered dietitian. The benefits of eating less meat? Decreased cancer risk, improving heart health, helping the environment, weight management and financial benefits are just a few. Helping your diet It may seem obvious that exchanging a hamburger for a black bean burger is an easy way to cut fat and calories out of your meal.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 1, 2012
Americans are making fewer visits to the doctor even if they are in poor health, new U.S. Census data has found. Working age adults visited the doctor about 3.9 times in 2010, down from 4.8 visits in 2001. Older people were more likely to visit a doctor than younger people, as were women compared to men. For those who defined their health as fair or poor, the average number of annual visits dropped from 12.9 to 11.6 during the period. Americans were even less likely to visit a dentist.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1991
The Sun conducted the following telephone Sundial call-in survey of Baltimore-area readers' holiday shopping plans and other issues affecting the retail industry from Nov. 8 through Nov. 11.While the sample was as large as those used in many national market surveys, the survey was not a scientific poll. It did not sample the entire population, only Sun readers, and it was, in the terminology used by polling professionals, "self-selecting," meaning that if people holding one point of view are more motivated to call, the findings can be skewed.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | January 2, 1994
The double whammy of the recession and Pentagon budget cuts hit J. Alexander Doyle's small manufacturing company hard -- real hard."Our employment and sales fell 30 and 35 percent, respectively, during the past year and a half," said Mr. Doyle, the owner of Micro Machining Inc., a precision-tool manufacturer in Woodlawn that employs 34 workers and grossed about $2.25 million last year.His company is hardly the only manufacturer in the state that has suffered in recent years. Mr. Doyle, president of the Maryland Manufacturers Association, a division of the Maryland Chamber of Commerce, said a lot of other factories -- big and small -- have been struggling.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
The Catholic Review, which has chronicled Catholic life in Baltimore in its weekly publication for nearly two centuries, has cut back to biweekly issues. The decision came after months of strategic planning and improvements to the publication's Web pages and social media sites, said Chris Gunty, its editor and associate publisher. The change is a move to preserve the paper and tailor it to the 21st-century reader, he said. "We are not cutting back," he said. "We are enhancing and adding to our content.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
Baltimore County school officials told middle and high school principals last week that they must limit the number of leadership positions next year to save $814,000, a move teachers say means schools have again been targeted for cuts. The decision will strip the title and pay from some teachers who act as department chairs and perform certain roles, including helping principals evaluate teachers, making sure books and supplies are evenly distributed, and deciding how curriculum will be taught.
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