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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1997
U.S. Customs officials unapologetically defend their policy of energetically questioning and searching more travelers, because, they say, more drugs are coming in and more money is going out of the country through Baltimore-Washington International Airport."
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2013
In one of the largest drug busts at the port of Baltimore in years, U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents seized two gym bags stuffed with nearly 128 pounds of cocaine from a Panamanian shipping container. Customs agents put the estimated street value of the drugs at $4 million. "'Tis the season for giving, but sometimes it's better to just seize," the agency said Tuesday in a statement announcing the Dec. 18 bust. The last cocaine seizure of such significant weight at the port was in 2007, when 310 pounds of the drug was found in three duffel bags inside a refrigerated container arriving from Ecuador, customs officials said.
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NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2001
U.S. Customs officials arrested two men yesterday on charges they tried to illegally export a sophisticated surveillance camera made in Maryland to Pakistan. The camera would have been used on unmanned planes, possibly to help Pakistan spy on or target weapons in neighboring India, officials said. Tensions between the countries have been running high for months, especially after both detonated nuclear weapons in tests in 1998. "We want to do everything we can to prevent the escalation of a conflict," said Allan Doody, special agent in charge of the U.S. Customs Service office in Baltimore, which handled the case.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Call them port discoveries. Federal agents intercepted dozens of animal skeletons at the port of Baltimore in recent weeks because they "pose a potential threat to the United States poultry industry," according to the Department of Homeland Security. Separately, a rugged four-wheel-drive truck seized in April was destroyed Tuesday by U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Chicken skeletons, found in display cases that had been imported from China, were found along with microscopes, test tubes, thermometers and other animal skeletons - of fish, rats, snakes and bats - and appeared to be educational materials, officials said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 9, 2000
A federal grand jury in Baltimore has indicted a Miami woman on charges she smuggled more than $400,000 worth of the drug Ecstasy into the United States. Fanny Pena-Morales, 36, was arrested Nov. 1 by U.S. Customs officials at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, after they discovered she was carrying 17,500 tablets of the designer drug, federal prosecutors said. The grand jury handed up an indictment Tuesday charging Pena-Morales with importation of Ecstasy. She could receive 20 years in prison and a $1 million fine if convicted.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON | August 15, 2008
About $36,000 in currency was seized from two passengers at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport this week, and another man was arrested on a drug possession charge after marijuana was found in his baggage, customs officials announced yesterday. Officials also announced that two stolen vehicles were intercepted last week at the port of Baltimore before they could be shipped to West Africa, bringing the number of stolen vehicles recovered there this year to eight.
NEWS
May 28, 2008
Making sure terrorists aren't smuggling some dangerous weapon into the country by way of the port of Baltimore or some similar entry point is a formidable challenge. It's unrealistic to inspect every container on every ship, for instance, so it's vital that authorities be able to determine which ought to be. That's why it's deeply troubling to learn from the Government Accountability Office that the Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT) is so fraught with problems. The cooperative government and business initiative is intended to make the vulnerability assessment process easier for U.S. Customs officials by having importers, port authorities and others submit security plans that meet certain minimum criteria.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2003
The Bureau of Customs and Border Protection wants shipping companies to tell them what is in every rail car, cargo plane and truck before it crosses into U.S. territory, as part of the federal agency's mandate to prevent terrorists or their weapons from slipping into the country. The new cargo-reporting requirements, which were published Wednesday, are to take effect this fall. They are the latest example of how customs officials are changing the way trade is conducted worldwide, with private industry shouldering a growing portion of the burden to keep borders safe without slowing commerce to a crawl.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1998
The Jamaican musician U.S. Customs officials fruitlessly strip-searched, handcuffed and took to the hospital to be X-rayed for possible drugs in September at Baltimore-Washington International Airport filed a $2 million claim against the federal agency yesterday.Peter Jackson, 26, a reggae artist who goes by the stage name Galaxy P, filed the administrative claim, which seeks $1 million in punitive damages and $1 million for personal injury.Customs spokesman Bill Anthony said yesterday that he could not comment because the case is going to be litigated.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2013
In one of the largest drug busts at the port of Baltimore in years, U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents seized two gym bags stuffed with nearly 128 pounds of cocaine from a Panamanian shipping container. Customs agents put the estimated street value of the drugs at $4 million. "'Tis the season for giving, but sometimes it's better to just seize," the agency said Tuesday in a statement announcing the Dec. 18 bust. The last cocaine seizure of such significant weight at the port was in 2007, when 310 pounds of the drug was found in three duffel bags inside a refrigerated container arriving from Ecuador, customs officials said.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON | August 15, 2008
About $36,000 in currency was seized from two passengers at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport this week, and another man was arrested on a drug possession charge after marijuana was found in his baggage, customs officials announced yesterday. Officials also announced that two stolen vehicles were intercepted last week at the port of Baltimore before they could be shipped to West Africa, bringing the number of stolen vehicles recovered there this year to eight.
NEWS
May 28, 2008
Making sure terrorists aren't smuggling some dangerous weapon into the country by way of the port of Baltimore or some similar entry point is a formidable challenge. It's unrealistic to inspect every container on every ship, for instance, so it's vital that authorities be able to determine which ought to be. That's why it's deeply troubling to learn from the Government Accountability Office that the Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT) is so fraught with problems. The cooperative government and business initiative is intended to make the vulnerability assessment process easier for U.S. Customs officials by having importers, port authorities and others submit security plans that meet certain minimum criteria.
TRAVEL
By KATHLEEN DOHENY and KATHLEEN DOHENY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 11, 2006
If a bird flu pandemic hits the United States, travelers should expect more scrutiny from customs officials worldwide, public health officials say. Depending on the U.S. airport, you may be asked to undergo testing if you appear sick. But beyond those steps, most public health agencies and travel industry groups and agencies are taking a wait-and-see approach. Implementation of additional protective measures depends on whether the virus, called H5N1, shows up in the United States. As of June 1, more than 218 human cases of avian influenza have been confirmed worldwide, including in Azerbaijan, Cambodia, China, Egypt, Indonesia, Iraq, Thailand, Turkey and Vietnam, according to the World Health Organization; 127 have died from the disease.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2005
With fears persisting that seaports are among the most vulnerable avenues for dangerous weapons to enter the country, and growing criticism of efforts to protect the borders, the port of Baltimore highlighted yesterday a piece of equipment that experts say can help. A powerful X-ray machine that can see through a foot of steel, bought by U.S. Customs and Border Protection for $6 million 18 months ago and brought to Baltimore in January, can scan up to 140 cargo containers a day at the state's marine terminals.
NEWS
September 5, 2004
Joan Shindledecker, president of a customs brokerage business, died Friday of breast cancer at her Dundalk home. She was 52. Born Joan Wolf in Dundalk, she was a 1970 Dundalk High School graduate. She attended Essex Community College. She joined the U.S. Customs Service after graduating from high school and rose to become executive secretary for Baltimore's district director of customs. She later became a customs import specialist and assessed tariffs on incoming goods. In 1984, she left her federal job and in 1987 became one of the founders of C J International Inc., a Baltimore customs broker and international freight forwarder based in Highlandtown and at Baltimore-Washington International Airport.
NEWS
December 18, 2003
John T. Walsh, a retired U.S. Customs Service official and former Cockeysville resident, died of cancer Monday at the Blakehurst Life Care Community in Towson. He was 74. Mr. Walsh was born in Chicago and raised in Oak Park, Ill. He attended the University of Illinois at Chicago and worked briefly as an index clerk at the Chicago Tribune before enlisting in the Army. He served with the engineering corps in Korea, and held the rank of corporal at his discharge in 1952. He began his career in 1955 as a U.S. Customs examiner in Chicago.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 31, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Clinton administration officials have rejected two vice presidential task force recommendations that would reduce customs inspections at international airports and create an "open border" with Canada in an effort aimed at eliminating delays at customs checkpoints.U.S. Customs Commissioner George Weise said the federal government has considered many ideas intended to improve entry and exit procedures at international portals, but relaxing border inspections is one of the bad ideas offered by the National Performance Review, a task force on reinventing government headed by Vice President Al Gore.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Sun Staff Writer | August 31, 1994
The manager of an Ellicott City Royal Farm store charged with theft in Howard County is being held by Michigan authorities after customs officials said he tried to enter Canada with $12,000 in cash stashed in two paper lunch bags under his car seat Monday.Howard County police have charged Timothy Thomas Tuerke, 37, of the 8400 block of Oakton Lane in Ellicott City, with several counts of theft from the convenience store, spokesman Sgt. Steve Keller said. He is accused of stealing more than $18,000 in cash over a four-day period from the store, police said.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2003
The Bureau of Customs and Border Protection wants shipping companies to tell them what is in every rail car, cargo plane and truck before it crosses into U.S. territory, as part of the federal agency's mandate to prevent terrorists or their weapons from slipping into the country. The new cargo-reporting requirements, which were published Wednesday, are to take effect this fall. They are the latest example of how customs officials are changing the way trade is conducted worldwide, with private industry shouldering a growing portion of the burden to keep borders safe without slowing commerce to a crawl.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2001
Fed up with Adelphia Cable's inability to improve its customer service, Carroll County's cable commission will begin fining the company this month. Adelphia has been Carroll's dominant cable provider since last year, when it bought the county franchise from Prestige Cable. Carroll is the only county in the Baltimore area that doesn't have a contract with Comcast Cable. County residents faced technical and customer-service problems with Prestige, local officials said, but they expected better from Adelphia, one of the nation's largest cable providers.
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