Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCustoms Agents
IN THE NEWS

Customs Agents

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2011
U.S. Customs agents intercepted a 24-ton shipment of Pakistani rice infested by a destructive crop pest this week at the port of Baltimore — just days before a federal quarantine on such imports was scheduled to begin. The Customs and Border Protection agency reported that its agents found dead Khapra beetles, a species that has been showing up in rice imports with growing frequency, aboard a ship Tuesday. The agency said a scientist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed the identification of the insect the following day. Restrictions on imports of rice from countries where Khapra beetle infestations are known to occur go into effect Saturday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agents on Monday seized almost $33,000 from a man at Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport who reported bringing only $9,000 into the country on his flight from London. Customs officers found $14,930 in cash and three endorsed checks totaling $18,059 - a total of $32,989 - in the man's luggage, authorities said. There is no limit to how much money someone can bring into the country, but federal law requires travelers to declare amounts exceeding $10,000 or equivalent in foreign currency.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2013
In one of the largest drug busts at the port of Baltimore in years, U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents seized two gym bags stuffed with nearly 128 pounds of cocaine from a Panamanian shipping container. Customs agents put the estimated street value of the drugs at $4 million. "'Tis the season for giving, but sometimes it's better to just seize," the agency said Tuesday in a statement announcing the Dec. 18 bust. The last cocaine seizure of such significant weight at the port was in 2007, when 310 pounds of the drug was found in three duffel bags inside a refrigerated container arriving from Ecuador, customs officials said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2013
In one of the largest drug busts at the port of Baltimore in years, U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents seized two gym bags stuffed with nearly 128 pounds of cocaine from a Panamanian shipping container. Customs agents put the estimated street value of the drugs at $4 million. "'Tis the season for giving, but sometimes it's better to just seize," the agency said Tuesday in a statement announcing the Dec. 18 bust. The last cocaine seizure of such significant weight at the port was in 2007, when 310 pounds of the drug was found in three duffel bags inside a refrigerated container arriving from Ecuador, customs officials said.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agents on Monday seized almost $33,000 from a man at Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport who reported bringing only $9,000 into the country on his flight from London. Customs officers found $14,930 in cash and three endorsed checks totaling $18,059 - a total of $32,989 - in the man's luggage, authorities said. There is no limit to how much money someone can bring into the country, but federal law requires travelers to declare amounts exceeding $10,000 or equivalent in foreign currency.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents intercepted a type of mealybug pest in an exotic fruit at Baltimore Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, federal officials said Monday. The bug, formally known as Maconellicoccus multipori, could have posed a "significant agriculture threat" as it feeds on the juices of greenhouse plants, house plants and subtropical trees, Robert D. Hunt, a U.S. Department of Homeland Security spokesman, said in a statement. The mealybug was found inside a cherimoya fruit brought by someone traveling from India in December 2012.
BUSINESS
By Journal of Commerce | December 29, 1992
MIAMI -- Some Christmas gifts are not what they appear to be. To demonstrate this, Lou Marcos, a Customs Service agent, hoisted what looked like a designer-signed scarf off the table and shook it, so the bold logo stood out from the swirl of colorful paisley patterns."
FEATURES
By Journal of Commerce | November 17, 1991
U.S. Customs Service agents are developing a more refined taste for authentic antique furniture, porcelain and silverware.Their new aesthetic sensitivity is aimed at learning to spot fakes.Foreign exporters or U.S. importers can save themselves from 2 to 25 percent in tariffs by claiming falsely that their goods are more than 100 years old."We checked six shipments and in all six there were things that were declared as over 100 years old that weren't," said Michael Brom, the supervisor of Customs' general investigations division Wilmington, N.C.As the customs investigator who kicked off his agencies' harder look at antique fraud back in 1989, Mr. Brom noted that this type of fraud is often perpetrated by the exporter overseas.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 5, 1997
Jackbooting, anyone?There is one quasi-police agency that has the Supreme Court's full blessing to engage in jackboot, fascist tactics that might chill former KGB agents to the bone. They live right here in the United States. They can stop you, strip you and conduct cavity searches of any part of your body any time they damn well feel like it.They're called customs agents. In my Oct. 26 column, I wrote that "The U.S. Constitution clearly forbids unreasonable searches. Customs agents - whether they're body probing [a woman]
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2000
Expressing skepticism that two Baltimore area women would be able to prove they were improperly strip-searched by U.S. Customs Service agents, a federal judge said yesterday they will have to provide evidence of their claims before their lawsuit against the government is allowed to move forward. "The burden is on the plaintiffs to come forward with evidence ... that your view of events is sufficiently plausible," U.S. District Judge Andre M. Davis said in setting a hearing for Nov. 21. "Otherwise, you would get a trial simply based on an allegation that you were subjected to a body cavity search."
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
The eggs of a destructive foreign moth species that "poses a significant threat to our nation's forests and urban landscapes" were found aboard a carrier ship docked in Baltimore in mid-September, U.S. Customs and Border Protection said Monday. Customs agents discovered six masses of Asian Gypsy Moth eggs during a Sept. 16 inspection of the Columbia Highway, a vehicle carrier that had made port calls in Japan in June and July, the border agency said. Females of the species can travel 25 miles per day and "can lay egg masses that could yield hundreds of hungry caterpillars," the agency said.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Call them port discoveries. Federal agents intercepted dozens of animal skeletons at the port of Baltimore in recent weeks because they "pose a potential threat to the United States poultry industry," according to the Department of Homeland Security. Separately, a rugged four-wheel-drive truck seized in April was destroyed Tuesday by U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Chicken skeletons, found in display cases that had been imported from China, were found along with microscopes, test tubes, thermometers and other animal skeletons - of fish, rats, snakes and bats - and appeared to be educational materials, officials said.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents intercepted a type of mealybug pest in an exotic fruit at Baltimore Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, federal officials said Monday. The bug, formally known as Maconellicoccus multipori, could have posed a "significant agriculture threat" as it feeds on the juices of greenhouse plants, house plants and subtropical trees, Robert D. Hunt, a U.S. Department of Homeland Security spokesman, said in a statement. The mealybug was found inside a cherimoya fruit brought by someone traveling from India in December 2012.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2011
Jaime Arbona, former customs agent for the ports of entry to Baltimore, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Oct. 20 at his Cedarcroft home. He was 88. Born in Utuado, Puerto Rico, where he attended the University of Puerto Rico, he served in the Army Corps of Engineers during World War II. He was stationed in Honolulu. He moved to Baltimore in 1945 and studied at the Johns Hopkins University. He taught Spanish at the Berlitz School and in the Baltimore County public schools system.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2011
U.S. Customs agents intercepted a 24-ton shipment of Pakistani rice infested by a destructive crop pest this week at the port of Baltimore — just days before a federal quarantine on such imports was scheduled to begin. The Customs and Border Protection agency reported that its agents found dead Khapra beetles, a species that has been showing up in rice imports with growing frequency, aboard a ship Tuesday. The agency said a scientist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed the identification of the insect the following day. Restrictions on imports of rice from countries where Khapra beetle infestations are known to occur go into effect Saturday.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2011
Weeks after three Royal Caribbean employees were charged with trying to smuggle cocaine and heroin on board a Baltimore-bound cruise ship, officials found more drugs hidden on the same vessel, they announced Tuesday. More heroin and cocaine — worth around $94,000 — were found on Saturday in a locker in an area largely limited to employees of the luxury cruise ship Enchantment of the Seas, said Steve Sapp, a spokesman for U.S. Customs and Border Protection, which carried out the inspection with immigration and customs officials.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2001
A 20-year-old Harford County man was arrested yesterday on charges he operated a computer server that allowed people from across the globe to swap images of child pornography, federal officials said. George Morgan Haak of the 5200 block of Deer Trail surrendered to authorities after being indicted last week by a federal grand jury on 10 counts of trafficking in child pornography. U.S. Customs Service agents began investigating Haak in late 1999, after police in Germany discovered an Internet chat room user called "Pornoboy" offering access to his computer server, where photographs of naked children were found, according to court documents.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
The eggs of a destructive foreign moth species that "poses a significant threat to our nation's forests and urban landscapes" were found aboard a carrier ship docked in Baltimore in mid-September, U.S. Customs and Border Protection said Monday. Customs agents discovered six masses of Asian Gypsy Moth eggs during a Sept. 16 inspection of the Columbia Highway, a vehicle carrier that had made port calls in Japan in June and July, the border agency said. Females of the species can travel 25 miles per day and "can lay egg masses that could yield hundreds of hungry caterpillars," the agency said.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN REPORTER | December 9, 2006
It seemed like a routine seizure when federal customs agents intercepted a package of steroids at John F. Kennedy Airport in New York. From JFK, the investigation led authorities to Anne Arundel County to what they now call one of the largest stashes of man-made muscle enhancers found in the region.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.