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NEWS
By Luther Young | April 15, 1991
In the beginning, it must have seemed like a great idea to put the official National Weather Service thermometer for downtown Baltimore on the roof of the U.S. Custom House, flat and secure and 113 feet above the harbor.But 83 years have passed since the huge gray granite building at Gay and Water streets was new, and high-rise office towers and parking garages looming closer are raising temperature readings and forecasters' concerns about their accuracy."The location isn't ideal, but we won't move it," said Fred Davis, meteorologist-in-charge for the NWS forecasting office at Baltimore-Washington International Airport.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance | July 2, 2012
It was so hot on Friday that the high temperature of 103 degrees at BWI Marshall Airport would have set a record on any other June day. But even though it didn't technically surpass the official high mark for Baltimore, it did break records. The record for June 29 in Baltimore is 105 degrees, set in 1934. But that, of course, was before Friendship Airport was built in 1950 (later to be renamed BWI). At the airport, the high temperature record for June 29 was 99 degrees, set in 1959, until Friday, according to the National Climatic Data Center . Friday's heat shattered the record by 4 degrees.
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BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | October 10, 1991
The historic U.S. Custom House at Gay and Lombard streets is slated to undergo an $11 million face lift starting late next year, its first major renovation in more than a decade.FTC The architectural firm of D'Aleo Inc. and the Philadelphia-based preservation architect Hyman Myers have been hired to handle design work for the project, which involves upgrading spaces throughout the 1908 landmark. "The goal is to restore the building as much as possible and bring it up to code," said Trudy Wang, project manager for the Philadelphia office of the General Services Administration, which issued the contract for the work.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | October 5, 2008
Taking a motif and running with it, Elizabeth and Charles Atwood custom-built a house that could sit in the French countryside with wood shutters, timbers and flower baskets against the hand-troweled stucco-look exterior, and an interior to match. In planning the space, they wanted the flow of the rooms to be suitable for large-scale entertaining, family gatherings and children's parties. "It is a timeless generational house. It's French Provincial, with high-set door handles, the same theme throughout," Elizabeth Atwood said.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1998
It might not be any cooler in downtown Baltimore this summer. But at least the weather reports will sound cooler.The National Weather Service switched its downtown weather station yesterday from the chronically overheated roof of the Custom House on Gay Street to a grassy spot across the harbor at the Maryland Science Center.The new station is expected to produce hourly temperature readings 3 to 5 degrees cooler than the old one."I think it's a real winner for people in Baltimore," said meteorologist John Newkirk, of the weather service's Sterling, Va., office, where the region's daily weather reports and forecasts are compiled.
NEWS
By Katy O'Donnell and Katy O'Donnell,SUN REPORTER | December 4, 2007
A small crowd gathered yesterday morning below blue and green maritime-themed murals in the airy but stately Call Room, a two-story pavilion in the center wing of the U.S. Custom House in Baltimore, to celebrate the building's centennial. The event, hosted by the U.S. General Services Administration and Barbara Shelton, the GSA regional administrator, brought several local and national government officials to speak about the importance of the national historic landmark and its contribution to Baltimore's port industry over the past 100 years.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | December 24, 1994
It has been more than 10 years since builder Jerome J. Kendall declared personal bankruptcy and began leaving a string of unfinished houses, unpaid debts and angry customers and suppliers throughout Maryland.From custom homes begun in northern Baltimore County to tiny saltboxes on the Eastern Shore, Mr. Kendall's unfinished projects aroused so much outrage that Maryland enacted a state law to help govern custom home construction.Now, after a 1992 federal bank fraud conviction and 10 months in prison, Mr. Kendall (formerly known as Jerome J. Knoedler)
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Sun | June 8, 2008
When Kevin and Melissa Armentrout decided to build a custom house in Perry Hall, it was all about creating a one-of-a-kind look. "When you pick everything out down to the doorknobs you have no one to blame but yourself," said Kevin Armentrout. "But what you have is your own product. It's nice to say your house is unique, because it really is." Each year, people like the Armentrouts decide to buck the usual route of purchasing a new or existing house and opt for the more unconventional path of building their own. The do-it-yourself method requires countless decisions, including picking out the lot, the architectural plans, the builder, the paint and, in the case of the Armentrouts, nickel hinges and doorknobs.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | July 4, 1997
For more than 200 years, the hill just east of the Little Patuxent River nursed trees, crops and pastures as the property passed from wealthy planters to family farmers. Today, it cradles the two-story house of John and Pamela Cooney.Over the past two months, their house has risen from Columbia's brownish-red earth, born by the efforts of more than four dozen workers who have labored from early morning until late afternoon. Some have dug the foundation, others have built the frame or installed the plumbing, electricity, heating and air conditioning.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1998
It was plenty hot this week in downtown Baltimore. It's only the thermometer that has cooled off.At the end of April, the National Weather Service moved itsdowntown weather station from the broiling rooftop of the old Custom House on Gay Street, to a grassy patch across the Inner Harbor.Since then, the official daily highs reported for downtown have been lower, by as much as 9 degrees, than those that would have been reported from the Custom House. The overnight lows have been as much as 12 degrees cooler.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Sun | June 8, 2008
When Kevin and Melissa Armentrout decided to build a custom house in Perry Hall, it was all about creating a one-of-a-kind look. "When you pick everything out down to the doorknobs you have no one to blame but yourself," said Kevin Armentrout. "But what you have is your own product. It's nice to say your house is unique, because it really is." Each year, people like the Armentrouts decide to buck the usual route of purchasing a new or existing house and opt for the more unconventional path of building their own. The do-it-yourself method requires countless decisions, including picking out the lot, the architectural plans, the builder, the paint and, in the case of the Armentrouts, nickel hinges and doorknobs.
NEWS
By Katy O'Donnell and Katy O'Donnell,SUN REPORTER | December 4, 2007
A small crowd gathered yesterday morning below blue and green maritime-themed murals in the airy but stately Call Room, a two-story pavilion in the center wing of the U.S. Custom House in Baltimore, to celebrate the building's centennial. The event, hosted by the U.S. General Services Administration and Barbara Shelton, the GSA regional administrator, brought several local and national government officials to speak about the importance of the national historic landmark and its contribution to Baltimore's port industry over the past 100 years.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to the Sun | August 31, 2007
Larry Strassner and David Reed are the first to admit that they have "over-customized" their Abingdon home. But the ambience they have created in the past 10 years suits their lifestyle perfectly. In 1997, after a burglary at their Hamilton home in Baltimore, the men purchased a two-story, brick Colonial in the Harford County development of Timberwood. The base cost of the four-bedroom, three-bath home was $180,000, but they sprang for upgrades that included all-wood flooring, ceramic kitchen tile, a cathedral ceiling in the master suite, two gas fireplaces and upgraded door moldings.
BUSINESS
By Patricia V. Rivera and Patricia V. Rivera,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 23, 2003
Vita Strong had always heard about people falling in love with a home the moment they walked into one. She never experienced it. That is, until she found a two-story model home on Kent Island, that strip of marsh and farmland on the western hip of the Delmarva Peninsula. The 20-foot-high living room ceiling caught her attention after living almost 20 years in a townhouse. She loved the open floor plan with no doors in between the kitchen, dining room and living area. "I knew right away that this was it," said Strong, a retired University of Maryland administrative assistant.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2002
A Michigan company has scaled back the size of its proposed "top-of-the-line" strip club on The Block in an effort to speed approval of the project. The Deja Vu chain has told the city liquor board it plans to keep the current dimensions of the former Custom House Saloon at 18 Custom House Ave. rather than expand that space to nearly 17,000 square feet - far larger than most of The Block's nearly two dozen clubs. The decision to use the prior club's space means the liquor board will not have to hold a public hearing on a request to transfer the liquor and adult entertainment licenses to Deja Vu. Instead, an informal "conference" will be held tomorrow at City Hall.
NEWS
By Glenn Collins and Glenn Collins,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 5, 2002
NEW YORK - A private group that monitors federal memorials has placed Federal Hall National Memorial in New York City on its list of 10 Most Endangered National Parks. The memorial is the site of the nation's first Capitol, which was on Wall Street and where George Washington was sworn in as the nation's first president. Washington appeared on an open-air second-floor balcony to take the oath of office on April 30, 1789. `A hidden gem' "This monument is a hidden gem, considering the key principles of democracy that were confirmed on this site," said Tom Kiernan, president of the National Parks Conservation Association, an independent advocacy group that monitors the parks.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | August 26, 1995
It will be another week before we officially know how hot it is in Baltimore.National Weather Service officials prematurely said that a new, more accurate electronic thermometer that was installed on the roof of the Custom House at South Gay and Lombard streets went on-line Monday afternoon.In fact, the system still is being tested as a few bugs are being worked out, and official temperatures will not be recorded until Sept. 1, said Amet Figueroa, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service at Baltimore-Washington International Airport.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | October 18, 1995
The Coast Guard announced yesterday it will merge its Group Baltimore, which handles search and rescue operations, and its Marine Safety Office, which performs ship inspections and responds to pollution and chemical spills, as part of a sweeping reorganization.Baltimore's units will combine at Curtis Bay by mid-November into a single "Activity" that will centralize Coast Guard functions for a region, one of four such regional centers. The Marine Safety Office, now located at the Custom House in Baltimore, will move to Curtis Bay, where Group Baltimore is located.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2000
The case of the Ionic columns has taken an ironic turn, as plans to raise eight nearly 200-year-old marble pillars in Annapolis have stalled because of concerns about a concrete foundation laid just two years ago. Those involved say it will be at least two weeks before the 16-foot scroll-top columns -- horizontal for nearly 30 years -- rise next to the Robert F. Sweeney District Courthouse on Rowe Boulevard. They are lying on the ground by the courthouse, surrounded by a construction fence.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1998
It was plenty hot this week in downtown Baltimore. It's only the thermometer that has cooled off.At the end of April, the National Weather Service moved itsdowntown weather station from the broiling rooftop of the old Custom House on Gay Street, to a grassy patch across the Inner Harbor.Since then, the official daily highs reported for downtown have been lower, by as much as 9 degrees, than those that would have been reported from the Custom House. The overnight lows have been as much as 12 degrees cooler.
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