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By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2011
Most people take a day off work to spend a little time with the family, hit the beach or a local park, or try to get a few errands done. Zeb Atkinson of Gambrills decided to stop in at a local business, spend nine hours slicing and sawing, and pay the proprietor more than $200 for the privilege. "It was like heaven," he says of the "vacation" day he took in April. "There wasn't a moment that wasn't interesting. " Atkinson, a 43-year-old amateur chef and food buff, believes he got the better of the bargain.
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NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
On the Chesapeake Bay, the summertime months are made for cruising. From the crisp mornings of late spring through the hazy evenings of August, a boat on the bay is the place to be. And how better to cruise than in a boat built by one of the bay's own builders? A handful of companies, on the Eastern and Western shores, design and build custom boats that are worthy of any body of water. But, thanks to their creators' deep knowledge of the area, these yachts are especially at home in the bay. Campbell's Custom Yachts 26106A Bachelor Harbor Drive, Oxford 800-361-4786 campbellsboatyards.com For Tom and Susan Campbell, owners of Campbell's Custom Yachts and three marinas in Oxford, what they do every day all comes down to one thing: the finished project.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Henry B. "Burke" Mathews Jr., a co-founder of a Hampden custom cabinet business, died Thursday of renal failure at his Ruxton home. He was 88. The son of Henry Burke Mathews, a vice president of Commercial Credit Corp., and Katherine Grove Mathews, a homemaker, Henry Burke Mathews Jr. was born in New Orleans. He moved with his family in 1928 to a home on Belvedere Avenue, and they later settled on Churchwardens Road in Homeland. A 1944 graduate of Gilman School, Mr. Mathews, who never used his first name, had started his education at Princeton University when he was drafted into the Army.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Octavia Dugan, who founded a Village of Cross Keys boutique and was considered an arbiter of traditional fashion, died in her sleep of undetermined causes Saturday at Palm City Nursing Home in Palm City, Fla. The former Cromwell Valley resident was 98. Born Octavia Whelan Chatard in Baltimore and raised on Calvert Street, she was the daughter of Dr. J. Albert Chatard, a physician, and Alice Whelan, a homemaker. She attended the Baltimore Academy of the Visitation and Notre Dame Preparatory School, where she graduated in 1934.
EXPLORE
August 31, 2011
October Guitars 8147 Main St., Ellicott City 410-696-8689 www.octoberguitars.com What's in store: Handmade custom electric guitars and a few acoustic ones fill the showroom, which relocated from Savage Mill in December 2010. Try out the models preferred by bands The Misfits and Raven, and artist Barry Goudreau. Custom guitars start at $2,200. The shop also carries a lower-priced import line, starting at $550 each.
TRAVEL
By Ting Chang and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 12, 2011
Who has the coolest car in Ocean City? Dub Magazine will make the call Saturday as custom cars, trucks and motorcycles gather at the convention center to compete for trophies awarded for all sorts of customizations - best paint job, best interior, best street bike and more. Hardcore fans will want to check out the cars and talk shop with the owners; newbies will want to marvel at all the creativity and maybe start thinking about their own custom conversion. In addition to cars and vendors, including Pirelli and Kawasaki, live music is on tap. Waka Flocka and Youtube sensation REJ3CTZ perform in concert with host Big Black from Fantasy Factory.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer K. Dansicker | February 27, 2012
The flowers are not the only things in bloom at Kroh's Nursery year after year. In fact, this family business has deep roots that continue to grow in this Aberdeen nursery. In 1980, husband and wife, Robert and Mickie Sachs purchased Kroh's Nursery because they wanted to spend the rest of their lives working in a nursery and garden center. And after high school, their son Jeff started working the family business. Today, Jeff runs the day-to-day operations and says, “I started working in the nursery with my parents when I was just 10 years old. I remember holidays and Mother's Day, which are the busiest days of the year for us.” Though Robert and Mickie still work at the nursery today, Jeff Sachs runs the business and has expanded what they offer with custom design/build landscape services including hand crafted stone walls and patios, garden pools and waterfalls, and landscape maintenance.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  TOUT No, not the French tout  ("all," pronounced TOO) but the English tout  (pronounced TOWT), which in American English seems to appear solely in journalism. I have never heard anyone use it in conversation.  Like many words, tout  has a shady past, traced by the OED . It was a relatively innocuous verb as the Old English tutian  and the Middle English  tute , toten , "to peep" or "to peer.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home | December 18, 2010
With the holiday entertaining season in full swing, you may find yourself lacking a dedicated space for mixing up and serving the latest cocktail. For some, a box of spirits and a six-pack in the fridge might be enough, but for large-scale entertaining, a home bar may be the answer — particularly if you are trying to get your guests out of the kitchen. Bar styles and options are as varied as those for sofas. Victorian, deco, urban contemporary, rustic, wood, metal, glass — whatever look you're trying to achieve, a custom cabinetry specialist can build you a bar to the dimensions and specifications you desire.
FEATURES
By Krishana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
If you take a peek into furniture maker Bill Hergenroeder's shop in Cockeysville, you may be surprised at what you don't see: no computer-assisted drawings or other high-tech design aids. He prefers the simple life. The concrete floor of his shop is splattered with old splotches of paint. Stacks of hand-drawn sketches, veneer outlines, screwdrivers and the occasional power drill are scattered around the small space, with just enough room for him to move about to work on his custom furniture creations.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
The dominant carrier on Maryland's health exchange, CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, will raise premiums beginning in January, though not nearly as much as the company wanted, state regulators announced Friday. CareFirst won approval to raise rates as much as 16 percent on the three plans it offers, while the Maryland Insurance Administration agreed to reduced rates requested from the three other companies that sell policies on the exchange — Evergreen Health Cooperative, Kaiser Permanente and UnitedHealthcare's All Savers Insurance Co. The companies made their pitches, and won approvals, based on information from the first open enrollment on the state's exchange, formed under the federal Affordable Care Act. The rates would not apply to most Marylanders, who get health insurance through their employers.
NEWS
August 15, 2014
I agree with the sentiments noted in " Smart meter apathy" (Aug. 11). BGE showed up at my door the same week I received a notice saying they would be in my neighborhood. I didn't understand that I had to make an appointment if I didn't want them to shut off my electricity with no notice in the middle of my work day (I work from home). I refused the service. I never heard from them again. I have enough going on in my life that it did not make it to my calendar to schedule an appointment.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
In a clearing off of a wooded lane in Stevenson is a white stucco, Tuscan-style villa with ornate cast-iron window boxes spilling summer vines, looking like the subject of an impressionist painting. Inside, beyond the driveway and the arched, two-story center bay, the Iliev family - Martin and Jessica, their 3-year old son, Max, and a pair of toy poodles, Sophie and Tiger - welcome visitors to their newly built home. In a large, open kitchen dominated by a center island that's topped with a 9-by-6-foot slab of white quartz, the Ilievs recalled purchasing the 4-acre parcel of land.
NEWS
August 11, 2014
The smart meter conspiracy theorists are no doubt buoyed by the news that BGE has been unable to secure appointments to replace the old, analog meters in the homes of some 350,000 customers. But there is no reason to think this reflects some groundswell of opposition to the new technology; on the contrary, it is a clear outlier when it comes to other smart meter installation projects across the nation and even within Maryland. The smart meter conversions for Pepco and Delmarva, for example, are 99 percent complete with opt-out rates of well less than 1 percent.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
As bills go out with the first fees for customers who don't want smart meters, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. is pressing to apply the charges to a much larger group - people the utility says have ignored repeated requests to switch out old meters located indoors or behind locked gates. About 350,000 customers with inaccessible meters - more than a quarter of BGE's territory - haven't scheduled appointments with contractors despite multiple attempts, the company said. That's preventing installation, but they aren't on the hook for the extra charge now levied on people who ask to opt out of a smart meter.
NEWS
By Cathy Drinkwater Better | August 4, 2014
Originally, mobile phones were the size, shape and heft of your average brick. People would walk down the street yelling, "Guess where I'm calling from!" into the mouthpiece. Now we have "smartphones. " Ironically, it's the user who has to be smart to understand all those apps (I think "apps" is short for "appetizers") or you can get an 8-year-old explain it to you. They miniaturized smartphones into video wrist-phones; then enlarged them again so people could watch movies. I wondered why anyone would watch a two-hour movie on a cellphone - until I spent an afternoon at the DMV. Now I get it. Yet, with all these advances, no one has figured out how to make calling customer service painless.
NEWS
By Marie Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2013
"Estate" is not a description that should be used indiscriminately - yet the term clearly when referring to the Colonial-style mansion at 1105 Bellevista Court in Severna Park. Located on nearly one acre in the subdivision of Belleview Estates, this four-story brick home with almost 9,000 square feet of living space was listed at $1,995,900 and sold for $1,850,000. It closed April 30 without ever being formally listed on the market. "[This was] one of the highest-selling, non-waterfront homes in Anne Arundel County and an example of the positive turn our housing market is taking," said Jennifer Sowers of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage, one of two co-listing agents.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
John Edwin Tyssowski, founder and owner of a Howard County heating, ventilation, air-conditioning and refrigeration company, died Dec. 12 of an aortic dissection at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Finksburg resident was 58. Mr. Tyssowski, who was the son of Social Security Administration workers, was born in Larkspur, Calif., and at a young age, moved with his family to Catonsville. He was a 1971 graduate of Catonsville High School, and two years later, married his high school sweetheart, the former Carol "Kim" Grenier.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
Customers of Towson's artisan bakery La Cakerie could easily mistake their surroundings for an enlarged dollhouse kitchen; high-pitched strains of pop music bounce off pink walls and the aroma of baking cake batter wafts through the air. Owner and executive chef Jason Hisley opened the West Allegheny Avenue location seven months ago, relocating from nearby West Chesapeake Avenue and joining La Cakerie's sales location in Mount Vernon. Listening to suggestions from a new crop of busy working professionals, Hisley expanded La Cakerie from its pastry roots.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. said 640,000 customers earned a credit on their bills last week for cutting back on electricity, the biggest test of a fledgling program aimed at reducing demand on hot days. The "Energy Savings Day" on Wednesday — part of BGE's voluntary Smart Energy Rewards program — earned people who bumped up their thermostats or made other changes an average of $6.80. It was the first such savings day of the summer. Dan Benner, an art director who lives in Annapolis, unplugged his power strips, turned off the lights, set his thermostat to 80 degrees and left for work.
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