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By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | May 25, 1994
Q: Why does my custard weep after a day or two?A: Custards weep very soon after setting because the starch breaks down. This is part of the natural process so it is advisable to make only the amount needed for the occasion. To activate the starch for the best possible custard, bring the milk and starch to a rolling boil and then whisk it very vigorously. Flour and cornstarch can be used to make a stronger starch bond, however, you must be careful not to use too much of this combination.Q: What is black vinegar?
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By Julie Rothman, Special To The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2012
Aylene Gard from Columbia was looking for the recipe that she misplaced for her husband's favorite rhubarb custard pie. Jerry Fore from Towson sent in a pie recipe he says is guaranteed to please rhubarb lovers. The recipe came from his mother and is a family favorite. He says the filling can be covered with a lattice, extra pieces of pie dough, or just left plain as his mother usually did. Rhubarb or "pie plant" can be found from late winter through spring with its peak season from April to June.
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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1996
There are those days when a tasty custard is exactly what you crave.A floating island custard, with a meringue topping, was the request of Margaret Waring of Baltimore who remembered her grandmother's making it.Chef Gilles Syglowski chose a response from Kay Bily of Cockeysville whose recipe was one her mother made. But the chef preferred the meringue topping recipe sent in by Mary Ann Herman of Dundalk.Bily's floating island custardMakes about 2 cups1 whole egg and 1 egg yolk slightly beaten3 tablespoons sugar1/8 teaspoon salt1 1/2 cups milk, scalded1/2 teaspoon vanillaCombine eggs, sugar and salt.
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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2009
Juanita McNeill of Marston, N.C., was looking for a recipe for an old-fashioned egg custard. Bonnie Giraldi of Perryville sent in an easy recipe for a baked egg custard. Her recipe is the classic one. It is simple to prepare; just be sure to put enough water in the hot-water bath. The water should come up to the level of the custard inside the dish. The water bath assures that your custard is protected from the heat. To me, baked custard is definitely a "comfort food." It is good almost any time of day, including breakfast.
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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | March 7, 2007
Lutie Shade of Timonium was looking for a recipe for bread pudding that has a layer of custard on the bottom, similar to the one her mother used to make. Avis McLeod of Rogers, Ariz., sent in a recipe for Pioneer Bread Pudding that she has been making for her family for many years. Her recipe comes from the Women's Home Companion Cookbook, first published in 1946. The master recipe is for a very basic bread pudding, but the book offers several variations, including butterscotch, fruit, mocha, chocolate and even marble bread puddings.
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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | June 4, 2008
Juanita McNeill of Marston, N.C., was looking for a recipe for an old-fashioned egg custard like the one her grandmother used to make. Trudy Garthe of Bellaire, Mich., saw McNeill's request in her local paper, the Traverse City Record-Eagle. Coincidentally, she had just made an egg custard for her father. Garthe sent in a copy of the recipe she used, which she found in one of her mother's old cookbooks, The New Fannie Farmer Boston Cooking School Cookbook, revised in 1951. She says that it was "quite easy and very tasty."
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By Kathryn Matthews and By Kathryn Matthews,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2000
Like Cher and '70s disco music, custards and their close kissing cousins, puddings, have made a cool comeback. They've left behind their roadside-diner status and now they're on dessert menus at the toniest restaurants. You'll recognize home-style favorites such as vanilla custard, bread pudding and rice pudding, and fancy restaurant classics, like creme brulee and creme caramel. But there's a distinctly new taste twist. These days, his top-selling chipotle flan has pastry chef Fabrice Mallet scrambling to fill orders at JBar, a Mexican-inspired restaurant in Tucson, Ariz.
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By Nicholas Boer and Nicholas Boer,KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | February 25, 2001
Pudding had its day, flan came and went, but don't mess with brulee. It's here to stay. So let's bring it home. First off, you don't need a blowtorch. But it does add to the thrill and mystery. Like hand-blown glass, creme brulee is clearly elegant -- and remarkably fragile for being created from a hot blue flame. There is a difference, however. Whereas a work of glass may take years of practice, a perfect creme brulee can be had on the very first try. I've made thousands of brulees in many guises since my first batch, but they all start with a simple recipe I learned in an elegant French restaurant on a resort in Kauai.
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By M.S. Mason and M.S. Mason,The Christian Science Monitor | February 7, 1993
When creme brulee is made to perfection, eating it is a little like falling into clouds -- a satin luxury. The twice-cooked and chilled custard is completed with a caramelized ("brulee" means burnt) sugar topping that cracks like glass when you tap it with a spoon. The contrast of cold custard and hot sugar, of silken vs. hard texture, of delicate vs. strong flavor, and of dark vs. light color sets the unpretentious dessert among the classiest, richest, and most delicious.So delicious, in fact, that a well-made creme brulee can make a French pastry chef's reputation.
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By Faye Levy and Faye Levy,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | July 30, 2003
Few summer pleasures compare to savoring just-made ice cream. Whether it's fine American ice cream, French glace or Italian gelato, the basic mixture is the same. It's a cooked sweet custard of milk or cream and egg yolks called creme anglaise or English cream, which is spiked with various flavorings. To make it, you need an ice-cream machine that stirs the custard as it freezes. This inhibits the formation of ice crystals that can mar silky smoothness. Equally important is patience.
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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | June 4, 2008
Juanita McNeill of Marston, N.C., was looking for a recipe for an old-fashioned egg custard like the one her grandmother used to make. Trudy Garthe of Bellaire, Mich., saw McNeill's request in her local paper, the Traverse City Record-Eagle. Coincidentally, she had just made an egg custard for her father. Garthe sent in a copy of the recipe she used, which she found in one of her mother's old cookbooks, The New Fannie Farmer Boston Cooking School Cookbook, revised in 1951. She says that it was "quite easy and very tasty."
NEWS
By Regina Schrambling and Regina Schrambling,Los Angeles Times | February 20, 2008
German Chocolate Cake looks pretty good for 50. The combination of tangy-sweet layers and nutty custard is as irresistible as it was when the recipe was first published in a Texas newspaper back in the Eisenhower era. If it were a Reese's cup or an Oreo, German Chocolate Cake would be into its 10th reincarnation by now. But this is one venerable dessert that needs an homage more than a makeover. If you take the same concept, with essentially the same ingredients, you can produce any number of variations with just as much extravagant flavor and texture but with 2.0 attitude.
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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | March 7, 2007
Lutie Shade of Timonium was looking for a recipe for bread pudding that has a layer of custard on the bottom, similar to the one her mother used to make. Avis McLeod of Rogers, Ariz., sent in a recipe for Pioneer Bread Pudding that she has been making for her family for many years. Her recipe comes from the Women's Home Companion Cookbook, first published in 1946. The master recipe is for a very basic bread pudding, but the book offers several variations, including butterscotch, fruit, mocha, chocolate and even marble bread puddings.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
In the Greek dessert family, galaktoboureko is like baklava's little brother: lighter and lesser known, but still prized for its combination of soft custard and crisp phyllo. Served in squares or rolls, galaktoboureko (pronounced ga-LA-to-BOUR-eko) is also much trickier to say. Though not well-known outside the Greek community, it is a dessert staple within it. And unlike baklava, it has no nuts. "Baklava is traditional and nice, but it's also a heavier dessert -- a lot more sweet," said Nora Kefalas, who will share with the public more than 700 of the rolled galaktoboureko she helped make at this weekend's St. Nicholas Greek Folk Festival.
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By DONNA PIERCE and DONNA PIERCE,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 22, 2006
In England, I was served from a huge dish of creme brulee that was covered with a glassy-smooth, see-through sheet of caramelized sugar. It was smooth as ice. How do you get caramelized sugar to look like a golden ice-skating rink? The smooth caramelized sugar topping you describe is made by using a small kitchen torch. They're sold at most cooking or baking supply stores for $30 to $40. The process for creating a slick, shiny surface with the torch is described in Essentials of Baking, from Williams-Sonoma.
NEWS
February 8, 2006
Serves 6 1 pound sweet cherries (about 3 cups), pitted grated zest of 1/2 lemon, organic if available 1/4 cup sugar (divided use) 1/2 cup (4 ounces) all-purpose flour, pastry flour or whole-wheat pastry flour, plus 1 tablespoon for the skillet pinch of salt 4 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature (divided use) 3 eggs 2 cups warm milk (divided use) 2 tablespoons Armagnac or cognac 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract confectioners' sugar Early in the day, rinse and dry the cherries.
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By Marissa Lowman and Marissa Lowman,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2003
One can almost smell salt water lingering on fresh salmon or the aroma of cloves wafting from a mug of mulled cider. Kitchen of Light (Artisan, 2003, $35) transports the reader to Oslo, Norway, where author Andreas Viestad lives and films a cooking show. Filled with 152 breathtaking color photographs of both the 106 recipes and the natural landscape, this cookbook is an adventure for the senses. The author guides you with finesse, breathing life into the recipes with personal anecdotes, ranging from how he once kissed a fish to his untraditional celebration of Christmas.
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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO HE SUN | September 7, 2005
Barbara Berndt from Pinehurst, N.C., was hoping that someone would have a recipe for baked custard that used egg substitute in place of real eggs. She once had a recipe for the custard that appeared on the carton of Eggbeaters when they first were introduced. When she contacted the company, she was told that it had no such recipe on file. Fortunately, several readers sent in their recipes for baked custard that used egg substitutes. The recipe that Shirley Martel from Bel Air sent in seemed closest to what Barbara was looking for. It makes good, basic low-fat custard that quite honestly tastes almost as good as basic custard made with real eggs and whole milk but has significantly less fat and cholesterol.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN FOOD EDITOR | July 20, 2005
If you suffer from pie phobia, put aside your worries. John Phillip Carroll is out to prove that there's a reason for the saying, "easy as pie." In Pie, Pie, Pie (Chronicle Books, 2005, $19.95) he offers 60 clear and concise recipes, many with helpful tips on how to avoid some of the most common pie-making blunders. Your meringues don't rise? Try warming the egg whites slightly before beating them. Crusts too soggy? Try a glass baking dish. The recipes collected in this book range from the traditional apple pie to the more unusual rum-raisin cream cheese pie and coconut macadamia cream pie. In addition to fruit, cream and custard pies, there are also recipes for chiffon pies and candy pies, each recipe sounding more delicious than the last.
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