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By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1999
There is an adage that says "father knows best." But Crofton heavyweight Garth Hedger isn't sure that also applies to his future father-in-law.Hedger, who meets Scott Jones of Baltimore in the co-feature at Martin's West tomorrow night, is co-managed by Arthur Verbin, the father of Lisa Verbin, his longtime fiancee.After watching Hedger (12-4-1) get soundly whipped twice this year, Arthur Verbin strongly urged him to retire from the ring."He told me, `Garth, you're a nice-looking, bright, articulate young man. Find something better to do with your life.
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By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1999
There is an adage that says "father knows best." But Crofton heavyweight Garth Hedger isn't sure that also applies to his future father-in-law.Hedger, who meets Scott Jones of Baltimore in the co-feature at Martin's West tomorrow night, is co-managed by Arthur Verbin, the father of Lisa Verbin, his longtime fiancee.After watching Hedger (12-4-1) get soundly whipped twice this year, Arthur Verbin strongly urged him to retire from the ring."He told me, `Garth, you're a nice-looking, bright, articulate young man. Find something better to do with your life.
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SPORTS
By John Kass and John Kass,Chicago Tribune | February 12, 1992
INDIANAPOLIS -- As Mike Tyson went through his first full day as a convicted rapist, probation authorities added another problem to his ruined life yesterday.They said they would call his ex-wife, Robin Givens, in compiling a sentencing report for Judge Patricia Gifford, the former sex-crimes prosecutor who will sentence him on March 6."He was reserved, quiet and soft-spoken and respectful," said Steve Wills, the chief probation officer who interviewed Tyson for more than one hour.Wills said his office will contact Givens, a television actress, and give her the opportunity to offer her insights into the former world heavyweight champion.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1996
"Fear is your best friend and worst enemy. It's like fire. If you can control it, it can heat your house. If you can't control it, it will burn everything around you and destroy you." -- Cus D'Amato, Mike Tyson's late manager.LAS VEGAS -- Learning to control his fear was one of the most important lessons a teen-aged Mike Tyson learned from Cus D'Amato in his formative years as a fighter while being raised as D'Amato's surrogate son in Catskill, N.Y.Employing his intimidating presence in and out of the ring, Tyson won recent title fights against Frank Bruno and Bruce Seldon virtually before the opening bell had sounded.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1996
"Fear is your best friend and worst enemy. It's like fire. If you can control it, it can heat your house. If you can't control it, it will burn everything around you and destroy you." -- Cus D'Amato, Mike Tyson's late manager.LAS VEGAS -- Learning to control his fear was one of the most important lessons a teen-aged Mike Tyson learned from Cus D'Amato in his formative years as a fighter while being raised as D'Amato's surrogate son in Catskill, N.Y.Employing his intimidating presence in and out of the ring, Tyson won recent title fights against Frank Bruno and Bruce Seldon virtually before the opening bell had sounded.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 8, 1990
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- For 37 fights, Mike Tyson carried an aura of indestructibility into the ring. No one doubted his brute strength or killer instinct.His only vulnerability seemed to be his penchant for finding trouble and provoking fights and lawsuits outside the ring.But the former undisputed heavyweight champion, who battles British-born Alex Stewart in the Atlantic City Convention Center tonight, proved he was all too mortal in losing his crown to James "Buster" Douglas, a 40-1 underdog, in Tokyo last February.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | April 28, 1995
The TV Repairman:The HBO production of "Tyson" plays the premium cable tomorrow at 8 p.m. and it's a sterling effort by all concerned unless, of course, you prefer sugar-coating. Don King and Robin Givens come across exactly as they were during Iron Mike's rise to the heavyweight title and Jai White does a solid job while portraying the monstrous anger welling up in the title character.A lot of people, including Tyson's initial mentor, Cus D'Amato (George C. Scott), took shortcuts during Tyson's development from a street thug to a millionaire thug, and ex-fighter Jose Torres, on whose book "Fire and Fear" the movie is based, probably said it best when he said, "Cus made Mike into a great fighter; he died before he could develop him as a person."
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1996
LAS VEGAS -- Frank Bruno owns the World Boxing Council heavyweight crown. But that is a fact seemingly known by only the most loyal of British boxing fans.The powerfully built champion with the Cockney accent has been treated with disdain by American ring critics and reviled by Mike Tyson's entourage, which has taunted him with shouts of "you'll end up dead" in tomorrow night's championship rematch.Tyson, the former undisputed champion and convicted rapist, is the star of promoter Don King's latest boxing extravaganza.
SPORTS
By Stan Hochman and Stan Hochman,Knight-Ridder | October 31, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- If Wilt Chamberlain didn't have impeccable taste, if he were braggadocious, or flamboyant, he'd build a 7-foot-high golden arch outside his Bel Air, Calif., mansion, and install a blinking, digital, ever-changing sign in the shape of a smile that said, "Over 20,000 satisfied customers."That's the number, 20,000. It's in Wilt's new book, "A View From Above."Points? Rebounds? Assists?You want statistics, buy the official NBA encyclopedia.You want Wilt's bedroom box score, it's right there, Chapter 11: "If I had to count my sexual encounters, I would be closing in on 20,000 different ladies."
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2005
Kevin Rooney acknowledges that when he was growing up, trouble always seemed to be right around the corner. Rooney said he considered himself a ringleader during those days in Staten Island, N.Y. - his fists earning him the respect of teenage peers on the streets as well as an occasional night in jail. Rooney later turned to fighting as a career, first as a boxer and then as the trainer who guided Mike Tyson to the heavyweight championship. That relationship ended in acrimony, but Rooney, 49, is still training fighters.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1996
LAS VEGAS -- Frank Bruno owns the World Boxing Council heavyweight crown. But that is a fact seemingly known by only the most loyal of British boxing fans.The powerfully built champion with the Cockney accent has been treated with disdain by American ring critics and reviled by Mike Tyson's entourage, which has taunted him with shouts of "you'll end up dead" in tomorrow night's championship rematch.Tyson, the former undisputed champion and convicted rapist, is the star of promoter Don King's latest boxing extravaganza.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | April 28, 1995
The TV Repairman:The HBO production of "Tyson" plays the premium cable tomorrow at 8 p.m. and it's a sterling effort by all concerned unless, of course, you prefer sugar-coating. Don King and Robin Givens come across exactly as they were during Iron Mike's rise to the heavyweight title and Jai White does a solid job while portraying the monstrous anger welling up in the title character.A lot of people, including Tyson's initial mentor, Cus D'Amato (George C. Scott), took shortcuts during Tyson's development from a street thug to a millionaire thug, and ex-fighter Jose Torres, on whose book "Fire and Fear" the movie is based, probably said it best when he said, "Cus made Mike into a great fighter; he died before he could develop him as a person."
SPORTS
By John Kass and John Kass,Chicago Tribune | February 12, 1992
INDIANAPOLIS -- As Mike Tyson went through his first full day as a convicted rapist, probation authorities added another problem to his ruined life yesterday.They said they would call his ex-wife, Robin Givens, in compiling a sentencing report for Judge Patricia Gifford, the former sex-crimes prosecutor who will sentence him on March 6."He was reserved, quiet and soft-spoken and respectful," said Steve Wills, the chief probation officer who interviewed Tyson for more than one hour.Wills said his office will contact Givens, a television actress, and give her the opportunity to offer her insights into the former world heavyweight champion.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 8, 1990
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- For 37 fights, Mike Tyson carried an aura of indestructibility into the ring. No one doubted his brute strength or killer instinct.His only vulnerability seemed to be his penchant for finding trouble and provoking fights and lawsuits outside the ring.But the former undisputed heavyweight champion, who battles British-born Alex Stewart in the Atlantic City Convention Center tonight, proved he was all too mortal in losing his crown to James "Buster" Douglas, a 40-1 underdog, in Tokyo last February.
NEWS
By Alan Goldstein | February 11, 1992
Last September, five months before facing an Indianapolis jury on charges of raping a teen-aged beauty pageant contestant, Mike Tyson boasted, "There is nothing on this planet Earth that can keep me from living my life or intimidate me. Unless I have a car accident or die, I'll get my heavyweight title back from Evander Holyfield."But there is little bluster or braggadocio left in the former heavyweight king, once considered unbeatable and indestructible.Late last night, Tyson, 25, was found guilty on one charge of rape and two counts of deviate sexual conduct.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1997
LAS VEGAS -- Mike Tyson prides himself on being a boxing historian, so it was only natural that a reporter recently asked him whether he considered himself worthy of election to boxing's Hall of Fame.But the question drew a fiery response."---- the Hall of Fame," he said. "The people that decide who goes into the Hall of Fame don't have any love or respect for me, so I have no love or respect for them."If anger alone could determine a fight's outcome, Tyson would be a prohibitive favorite to regain his heavyweight title Saturday night from Evander Holyfield, who scored a stunning, 11th-round knockout in their first fight last November.
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