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SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec | jeff.zrebiec@baltsun.com | March 28, 2010
- David Hernandez and four relievers shut down the Boston Red Sox in the Orioles' 6-1 victory Saturday before an announced sellout crowd of 8,037 at sun-splashed Ed Smith Stadium. Bidding to win the Orioles' fifth starter job over Chris Tillman, Hernandez tossed five scoreless innings, allowing four hits and two walks while striking out six. The Red Sox loaded the bases with no outs against Hernandez in the fourth, but the Orioles' right-hander, mostly relying on a buckling curveball, struck out the side, fanning Mitch Dening, Marco Scutaro and Josh Reddick.
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SPORTS
By Jon Meoli | May 26, 2012
Orioles top prospect Dylan Bundy knew that eventually, the scoreless-innings streak that defined his dominance in the Low-A South Atlantic League would come to an end. Now that it has, in his debut with the High-A Frederick Keys, Bundy can focus on incremental improvements like his pitch mix and command, which will be key to his development as he climbs the ladder toward Camden Yards. "Giving up your first one or two runs in pro ball, it's going to happen to everybody," Bundy said.
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NEWS
By BOB DROGIN AND JOHN GOETZ and BOB DROGIN AND JOHN GOETZ,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 20, 2005
BERLIN -- The German intelligence officials responsible for one of the most important informants on Saddam Hussein's suspected weapons of mass destruction say that the Bush administration and the CIA repeatedly exaggerated his claims during the run-up to the Iraq war. Five senior officials from Germany's Federal Intelligence Service, or BND, said in interviews with the Los Angeles Times that they warned U.S. intelligence authorities that the source, an...
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec | jeff.zrebiec@baltsun.com | March 28, 2010
- David Hernandez and four relievers shut down the Boston Red Sox in the Orioles' 6-1 victory Saturday before an announced sellout crowd of 8,037 at sun-splashed Ed Smith Stadium. Bidding to win the Orioles' fifth starter job over Chris Tillman, Hernandez tossed five scoreless innings, allowing four hits and two walks while striking out six. The Red Sox loaded the bases with no outs against Hernandez in the fourth, but the Orioles' right-hander, mostly relying on a buckling curveball, struck out the side, fanning Mitch Dening, Marco Scutaro and Josh Reddick.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,jeff.zrebiec@baltsun.com | June 4, 2009
SEATTLE - -The Orioles, of all teams, know how dominant Erik Bedard can be, so it would have been easy to dismiss Tuesday as one of those inevitable nights when they were shut down by a very good pitcher. The problem with that theory is it has been happening far too frequently to give the Orioles the complete benefit of the doubt. Bedard overwhelmed his former team, taking a three-hit shutout bid into the seventh inning and walking off the mound to a standing ovation in the Seattle Mariners' 8-2 victory over the Orioles in front of an announced 17,978 at Safeco Field.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | April 5, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - Have I got a spy story for you. It takes place just before the Iraq war. It reads like a thriller, except you can't believe the spooks in the story could be so clumsy. The most hair-raising chapter tells the tale of a defector named Curveball, who duped the United States into believing that Iraq had mobile germ-warfare labs. The saddest part of the tale is that it's all true. I refer to Thursday's report by the presidential commission that has been examining the ability of U.S. spy agencies to find foreign weapons of mass destruction.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney | June 7, 1996
On the field: Besides having to take up residence behind home plate in the interminably long contest, the Orioles' Gregg Zaun took some additional abuse. He was hit above the right knee by a pitch that bounced in the second inning, and in the bottom of the third, he was hit by a pitch.In the dugout: Even a magnetic brace couldn't make Orioles manager Davey Johnson's seat any more comfortable; watching his pitchers struggle, Johnson switched his seating arrangement few hundred times.In the clubhouse: "Jimmy's got to be able to establish his fastball to both sides of the plate, and get his curveball over.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 15, 1991
Give the folks at "Invention" points for inventiveness.It's playoff and World Series time, and they came up with a show on baseball inventions. And to make sure that their discussion of a computer system which tracks curveballs wasn't too dry, they got Jim Palmer out on the mound at Memorial Stadium to demonstrate."
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,[Sun Reporter] | November 11, 2007
Curveball Spies, Lies, and the Con Man Who Caused a War By Bob Drogin Random House / 343 pages / $26.95 You knew the case for going to war in Iraq was shaky, that Saddam Hussein's "weapons of mass destruction," which President Bush, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell and the CIA swore existed, never existed. You may not have realized just how cravenly eager they all were, in the months before Bush launched the war, to swallow a shoddy, half-baked story told by a two-bit Iraqi who defected to Germany hoping for a Mercedes and a nice apartment.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | March 13, 1992
BRADENTON, Fla. -- It isn't that Gregg Olson can't scare hitters. I've seen his curveball when it should have been on the cover of a Stephen King novel.But, sometimes the curveball doesn't work. You saw that happen on a semi- regular basis last season. You also saw Olson sporting a Clint-Eastwood-in-the- early-years stubble. It didn't help.Successful relievers don't have to look intimidating -- Dan Quisenberry could have passed for a Sunday school teacher -- but Olson isn't taking that chance.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,dan.connolly@baltsun.com | October 21, 2009
PHILADELPHIA -- George Sherrill never wanted to leave Baltimore. That was his stance back in July, when the Orioles dealt their 32-year-old closer to the Los Angeles Dodgers for two prospects. Ultimately, it was all out of Sherrill's control. So he accepted the move. Learned to embrace it. Now, he ponders it philosophically. "Everything happens for a reason, and maybe this is supposed to be my first shot at the playoffs," Sherrill said before Monday's Game 4 of the National League Championship Series.
NEWS
By Ben Krull | October 13, 2009
Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig announced today that President Barack Obama has been named the 2009 World Series MVP. In a written statement Commissioner Selig conceded the unprecedented nature of the decision to give the award to a non-player, even before the series was played, but said it was an easy choice. "It was obvious after he threw out the opening pitch at the All Star game that the president would be unhittable if he pitched in the Major Leagues," the statement read. Chicago White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf was euphoric over the announcement, telling reporters that he expected his team to be named world champions, even though they didn't make the playoffs.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,jeff.zrebiec@baltsun.com | June 20, 2009
PHILADELPHIA -- When Rich Hill was removed from his previous start after a rocky fourth inning, the normally docile pitcher made no attempt to hide his anger. Despite giving up four runs in the fourth and a two-run Orioles lead to the Atlanta Braves, Hill wanted the chance to salvage his outing and took out his frustrations on several pieces of equipment when he wasn't given that opportunity. In Friday's series opener against the Philadelphia Phillies, Hill again appeared headed for an early exit, but this time, he heeded pitching coach Rick Kranitz's advice and did something about it. The left-hander allowed two first-inning runs and then nothing else while pitching into the seventh inning and he added an RBI single in the Orioles' 7-2 victory over the Phillies before an announced sellout of 45,135 at Citizens Bank Park.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,jeff.zrebiec@baltsun.com | June 4, 2009
SEATTLE - -The Orioles, of all teams, know how dominant Erik Bedard can be, so it would have been easy to dismiss Tuesday as one of those inevitable nights when they were shut down by a very good pitcher. The problem with that theory is it has been happening far too frequently to give the Orioles the complete benefit of the doubt. Bedard overwhelmed his former team, taking a three-hit shutout bid into the seventh inning and walking off the mound to a standing ovation in the Seattle Mariners' 8-2 victory over the Orioles in front of an announced 17,978 at Safeco Field.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | May 15, 2009
Sugar is a near-great movie with qualities more unusual than some all-time classics. It resists cliche at every turn and puts something solid in its place: raw yet controlled observation that gives the film the form of a flexing muscle. The writing-directing team of Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck tell the fresh, enlivening story of a baseball player, Miguel "Sugar" Santos (Algenis Perez Soto), who progresses from a Dominican Republic training camp to spring training in Arizona and then to Single-A ball in Bridgetown, Iowa.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2008
Even a baseball novice could've told you which high school pitcher would make the majors. At a lean 6 feet 4 with a fastball that crossed 95 mph and uncommon poise for a teenager, McDonogh's Brandon Erbe could have been cast by Hollywood as a young Jim Palmer. Chorye Spoone? Well, the player from Northeast High was a chunky kid with an unruly temper whose fastball topped out at 87 mph. But a funny thing has happened since the two local pitchers were picked by their hometown Orioles in the 2005 draft.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | April 14, 1992
BOSTON -- It's not like Gregg Olson had to start all over again, but rather an impression that a new wrinkle here and there might be beneficial.When you have recorded 95 saves in three years and are on the verge of being the youngest reliever in history to reach 100, it wouldn't make a whole lot of sense to start looking for a new game plan.Making a change in delivery that keeps baserunners from taking more liberties than a pickpocket is an adjustment, not a change in philosophy. Adding a second fastball, one that can induce double-play grounders and reduce the workload is an adjustment, not a departure from style.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli | May 26, 2012
Orioles top prospect Dylan Bundy knew that eventually, the scoreless-innings streak that defined his dominance in the Low-A South Atlantic League would come to an end. Now that it has, in his debut with the High-A Frederick Keys, Bundy can focus on incremental improvements like his pitch mix and command, which will be key to his development as he climbs the ladder toward Camden Yards. "Giving up your first one or two runs in pro ball, it's going to happen to everybody," Bundy said.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,[Sun Reporter] | November 11, 2007
Curveball Spies, Lies, and the Con Man Who Caused a War By Bob Drogin Random House / 343 pages / $26.95 You knew the case for going to war in Iraq was shaky, that Saddam Hussein's "weapons of mass destruction," which President Bush, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell and the CIA swore existed, never existed. You may not have realized just how cravenly eager they all were, in the months before Bush launched the war, to swallow a shoddy, half-baked story told by a two-bit Iraqi who defected to Germany hoping for a Mercedes and a nice apartment.
SPORTS
By Compiled from interviews and other newspapers' reports | August 19, 2007
The Boston Red Sox, one of baseball's most balanced teams, felt the need to add it. So did the Seattle Mariners and Atlanta Braves. Most potential playoff teams try to do the same, whether it's through late-season trades or minor league call-ups. Big league bullpen help. You can never have enough. Dependable relief is one of the most overlooked aspects in baseball. During the wilting heat of August and the pressure cooker of September, however, nothing provides peace of mind like a rock-solid group of relievers.
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