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Curtis Bay

BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | June 22, 2007
FMC Corp. will shutter its Baltimore plant over the next 10 months, putting 130 workers out of jobs. The Philadelphia-based company, which makes insecticides and other agricultural chemicals, has decided to move its Curtis Bay operations to Asia because it's cheaper and closer to sources of raw materials. The plant makes ingredients for various products and faces growing worldwide competition from generic brands, Frank Siwajek, director of North American operations for FMC Agricultural Products, said yesterday.
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NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | February 24, 2008
A fire spread through five Curtis Bay rowhouses yesterday, seriously damaging three homes and displacing at least five families, according to the Baltimore Fire Department. The fire was reported about 4:15 p.m. in the 1600 block of Cypress St. in South Baltimore. City firefighters arrived to find three adjoining rowhouses engulfed in "heavy flames and smoke," according to Chief Kevin Cartwright, a Fire Department spokesman. Firefighters entered one of the burning frame houses in an attempt to extinguish the fire, but the flames grew worse, spreading through a common attic shared by the rowhouses, Cartwright said.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove | October 23, 1991
It was quiet in the peninsula neighborhoods of South Baltimore yesterday. No sounds of hearts breaking in Brooklyn. No moaning in Curtis Bay.In fact, no one seemed to mind at all being ripped from the rest of Baltimore and plopped into a new congressional district with parts of Anne Arundel County and the Eastern Shore. "Good riddance" was the overwhelming reaction."I'm happy they're passing us off to Anne Arundel," said Doris McGuigan, a retired homemaker and community activist in Brooklyn.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr. and John H. Gormley Jr.,Staff Writer | February 15, 1992
For the second time, the Coast Guard has withheld awarding a disputed contract for cleaning the fuel tanks and bilges of ships that come to the Curtis Bay shipyard for repairs.The contract, first advertised nearly a year ago, has been bogged down since by protests over the eligibility of bidders, sparking charges and countercharges about the fitness of the competitors.Sue White, chief of procurement at the Coast Guard supply center at Curtis Bay, said yesterday her office has concluded that all of the eligible bids are unreasonably high and that the bidding should be repeated.
NEWS
By Phillip Davis | January 8, 1991
In a rare reversal of their usual positions, community groups in Curtis Bay have welcomed a proposed garbage recycling plant into their heavily industrialized neighborhood -- but the city has blocked the proposal for now.Environmentalists and community organizers say the $30 million plant, which is proposed for the old Stoker fertilizer facility at 5800 Chemical Road in Curtis Bay, would bring jobs to the area, provide it with a needed drop-off point for...
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons | November 27, 1990
The 30-foot carcass of a whale that was found drifting at the mouth of Curtis Bay early yesterday took up a berth at the Dundalk Marine Terminal while officials and scientists decide what to do with it.The dead whale was spotted drifting in open water in the main channel of the Patapsco River, said Cpl. Ralph L. Parker of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources Police.Corporal Parker said the DNR assisted in handling the case but didn't have a boat large enough to pull the whale to shore.
NEWS
By FRANK S. PALMISANO III | February 12, 2003
DRIVE THROUGH Curtis Bay, a 1 1/2 -mile stretch of rowhouses and makeshift bars south of the harbor, and you're likely to experience a community that has its roots in blue-collar America. From the hillside architecture to the industrial buildings, docks and oil refineries, the sight is nothing short of mundane. The night is filled with the seedy transactions of prostitutes, drug dealers, and teen-age gangs in the streets. Disheveled men wander with knapsacks on their backs. Car stereos blare.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1996
John F. Griber, whose landmark Curtis Bay corner grocery store kept neighborhood tables and pantries supplied with fresh meats and vegetables, died Thursday of stroke complications at Meridian Nursing Center-Hammonds Lane. He was 84.For more than 60 years, "Mr. John" -- as he was called -- operated Griber's Grocery at Pennington Avenue and Church Street. In 1990, he retired and closed the business.Mr. Griber, who was born on Church Street and lived his entire life there, was the son of Lithuanian parents, who immigrated to Baltimore from Vilna at the turn of the century.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 7, 1993
Pieces of column too short to use:Baltimalaprop . . . Ordered by police to leave her home after a potentially dangerous chemical gas leak, a resident of Curtis Bay told a TV reporter: "We were evaporated from the area."*Believe me. I wanted to watch the Buffalo-Houston game last Sunday. In fact, I started watching it. Saw the Oilers' first touchdown. Then Nicholas took over. He's 2 1/2 years old and he calls the shots. He wanted to watch "Mary Poppins" on videotape. He was damn persistent about it, too!
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 17, 2003
A 24-year-old man died yesterday evening after falling from the back of a truck being driven by his father on Route 10 in Glen Burnie and being struck by another vehicle, state police reported. The victim, Elmer Leroy Dorsey III, was riding in the bed of a 1988 Jeep truck about 5 p.m. when he fell -- along with several pieces of the furniture they were taking to their home in the 1400 block of Locust St. in Baltimore's Curtis Bay neighborhood, said Sgt. Thornnie Rouse, a police spokesman.
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