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By PETER SCHMUCK | April 8, 2007
NEW YORK -- The moment was loaded with all kinds of meaning, but Alex Rodriguez wasn't about to untangle it for anyone. In the heady aftermath of Rodriguez's dramatic walk-off grand slam yesterday, teammate Derek Jeter pushed him up the dugout steps for a well-deserved curtain call. The crowd roared and A-Rod beamed, and for one afternoon all the unpleasantness that had gone before seemed very far away. Rodriguez, at least for a while, has won back New York after his relationship with Yankees fans deteriorated badly last season.
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By Katie V. Jones | September 3, 2011
This time of year, cast members and organizers of the September Song community theater group are usually bustling about, getting ready for the opening of the troupe's annual musical theater production. This year, that familiar cast of characters is bustling again. But this time, they're working on a one-night only fundraising performance aimed at keeping the lights from being dimmed on Carroll County's own touch of Broadway. "There's No Business Like Show Business," a musical revue highlighting songs from past September Song productions and popular Broadway shows, will be presented on Saturday, Sept.
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SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2000
His evening, his season and very possibly his career in Baltimore ended at 9:24 p.m. when Mike Hargrove came for him with one out in the seventh inning. For the first time in Mike Mussina's 288 major-league starts, he left the mound in mid-inning still holding the ball. Mussina then looked into the stands on the way to the Orioles' dugout, waved his glove and tipped his cap in a sign of appreciation and even farewell. A moment later, Mussina reappeared to answer a capacity Camden Yards crowd's curtain call, the Orioles' 9-1 win over the New York Yankees no longer in doubt but his future a compelling riddle.
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By Steve Jones | June 18, 2011
Erin McMunn and Cody Harman both attended Westminster East Middle School. When it came time for high school, their paths diverged — McMunn went to Winters Mill and Harman headed for Westminster. Yet, as high school seniors, they essentially ended up in the same place: Both student-athletes led their respective schools to state championships. McMunn added a critical leadership element to a young Winters Mill girls lacrosse team that wasn't expected to contend for another state title — but did. Harman's all-around offensive excellence and solid handling of the county's best pitching staff enabled Westminster's baseball team to complete an undefeated, championship season.
FEATURES
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 6, 2005
It's hard to believe it has been just six years since Marshall Mathers, a blond, unassuming, Detroit-bred rapper with a killer flow, stormed into pop. Known to the world as Eminem, he seems to have been around much longer, upsetting conservative media pundits, homosexual activists, black women and George W. Bush. His whiny tone and razor lyrical dexterity, his weird sense of humor and Dr. Dre's innovative beats have pushed his record sales past 65 million. He owns three Grammys. In less than 10 years, Eminem has become perhaps the most successful artist in hip-hop.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | October 3, 1993
When the subject of a conversation is Rick Sutcliffe, the conversants would do well to toss the cold numbers out the window.The numbers in last night's 8-4 Orioles win over the Toronto Blue Jays were not among Sutcliffe's best -- four runs, 12 hits, two walks.But the 46,094 fans who piled in to Camden Yards last night for what might have been Sutcliffe's last appearance in an Orioles uniform know there is something more to the 6-foot-7 right-hander than the numbers. That's why they showered him with a warm standing ovation and a curtain call when Sutcliffe left with one out in the ninth.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter | March 28, 1992
MOVIESBut it's funny"White Men Can't Jump" isn't a great movie, and in fact it's sloppy and ragged, but it's great fun as it follows the fortunes of a salt-and-pepper basketball team playing the mean brand of macho intimidation and backdoor moves on L.A.'s scary playground courts. Wesley Snipes and Woody Harrelson, good athletes, sell the jock part of the roles well, and their spatting is always profane and frequently funny. Rated R. If all the phrase "folk music" brings to your mind is acoustic guitars and "Tom Dooley," perhaps it's time you discovered Sweet Honey in the Rock.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | July 11, 1991
New York-- Right now, it's about even: the British, 4, the Americans, 4.The British are responsible for four big musicals, ''Cats,'' ''Les Miserables,'' ''Miss Saigon'' and ''Phantom of the Opera.'' The Americans have ''City of Angels,'' ''Grand Hotel,'' ''The Secret Garden'' and ''The Will Rogers Follies.'' We can't count '' Gypsy.'' It's a revival.''Miss Saigon'' deserves all the hype it has gotten. It is spectacular entertainment. Its chief distraction may be the fact that it is a downer, which is no surprise.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 15, 2001
SEVERAL YEARS AGO, Westminster resident Kim Goad realized that she was tired of flipping open her calendar to a sea of obligations and deadlines. She said she felt as if she were moving from project to project and meeting to meeting to earn money to pay her bills. She had little to no job satisfaction, and no joy. Once she realized that her priorities were jumbled, Goad decided that her life would change - and she changed it. She started saying no to things she really didn't want to do; she banished working on the weekends; and each day, she forced herself to stop working at 5 p.m. She also made it a point to do at least one nice thing for herself every day, whether it was walking the dog or cutting roses from her garden.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2001
When Cal Ripken wasn't accepting more congratulations or soaking in another long ovation in 1995, he managed to hit .262 with 17 homers and 88 RBIs. The season was cut short, to 144 games, because of the previous year's labor dispute. It remained long on drama and emotion. Could anyone forget his lap around Camden Yards on Sept. 6, the night Lou Gehrig let go of the record for consecutive games played? All the hands he touched? All the lives? It wasn't enough that Ripken tried to win ballgames.
SPORTS
By jamison hensley and jamison hensley,jamison.hensley@baltsun.com | January 9, 2009
Another playoff trip to top-seeded Tennessee. Another meeting with Kerry Collins. Another Super Bowl in Tampa, Fla. Everything points to a repeat of the Ravens' 2000 Super Bowl season. But there are just as many comparisons between this season's Ravens and - ahem - the Pittsburgh Steelers. Before Ravens Nation cries blasphemy, listen to why you want the Ravens to continue following in the footsteps of their division rival. The 2005 Steelers are really the one hope for NFL's No. 6 seeds.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun reporter | August 14, 2007
As Nickelback left the stage at Merriweather Post Pavilion one night last month, a plume of fire shot into the sky. "Thank you so much!" tattooed lead singer Chad Kroeger told the sellout crowd. "We'll see you soon." He meant it - literally. Less than two minutes later, Kroeger and his band mates returned to the stage for an encore. The 12,000 fans who had implored the band to come back may have thought their full-throated screams did the trick. But actually, the outcome had been as carefully planned as the on-stage pyrotechnics.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | April 8, 2007
NEW YORK -- The moment was loaded with all kinds of meaning, but Alex Rodriguez wasn't about to untangle it for anyone. In the heady aftermath of Rodriguez's dramatic walk-off grand slam yesterday, teammate Derek Jeter pushed him up the dugout steps for a well-deserved curtain call. The crowd roared and A-Rod beamed, and for one afternoon all the unpleasantness that had gone before seemed very far away. Rodriguez, at least for a while, has won back New York after his relationship with Yankees fans deteriorated badly last season.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | January 15, 2006
Theatre on the Hill, which has enlivened summers in Carroll County with drama, comedy, musicals and children's fare for 25 years, will go dark this season, and its future remains uncertain. The theater-in-residence at McDaniel College in Westminster produced as many as six shows a season. Shows last summer ranged from the thought-provoking Happy Birthday, Wanda June by Kurt Vonnegut Jr. to the comedic Nunsense and the musical Godspell. During two months of performances, the troupe also interacted with children pulled from the audience for matinees of Cinderella and Jack and the Beanstalk.
FEATURES
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 6, 2005
It's hard to believe it has been just six years since Marshall Mathers, a blond, unassuming, Detroit-bred rapper with a killer flow, stormed into pop. Known to the world as Eminem, he seems to have been around much longer, upsetting conservative media pundits, homosexual activists, black women and George W. Bush. His whiny tone and razor lyrical dexterity, his weird sense of humor and Dr. Dre's innovative beats have pushed his record sales past 65 million. He owns three Grammys. In less than 10 years, Eminem has become perhaps the most successful artist in hip-hop.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Chris Kaltenbach and Stephen Kiehl and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2005
Near, the end draws. Cry or cry not, there is no more. Forgive us the Yoda-speak, but come today the final installment of Star Wars does. Filmmaker George Lucas is ending his epic six-part tale of good vs. evil, the story of how a young Jedi Knight named Anakin Skywalker became the heavy-breathing poster boy for the Dark Side. For many fans, it's also the story of their lives. They packed the multiplexes over and over in the summer of 1977, bought the pajamas and the action figures and headed down a path that led them to this moment - 40 years old and camping out on a sidewalk to get prime seats to a science fiction movie.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 8, 1997
Meyerhoff Hall's classical-music audience can be an annoyingly restless, candy-wrapper-rustling bunch. During pianist Evgeny Kissin's solo recital there a few weeks ago, however, the hall was as quiet as a church. And when the pianist finished, the sold-out audience jumped to its feet with joyous cheers that sounded almost like spontaneous testifying at a revival meeting.Curtain call after curtain call brought Kissin back; and hundreds of fans, many of them teen-agers, kept the pianist busy signing autographs until well after midnight.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun reporter | August 14, 2007
As Nickelback left the stage at Merriweather Post Pavilion one night last month, a plume of fire shot into the sky. "Thank you so much!" tattooed lead singer Chad Kroeger told the sellout crowd. "We'll see you soon." He meant it - literally. Less than two minutes later, Kroeger and his band mates returned to the stage for an encore. The 12,000 fans who had implored the band to come back may have thought their full-throated screams did the trick. But actually, the outcome had been as carefully planned as the on-stage pyrotechnics.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
The Chesapeake Music Hall - the only dinner theater in Annapolis - will let the curtain fall on its last performance at the end of this month, succumbing to competitive pressure after 15 years. The music hall, just off U.S. 50 a few miles west of the Bay Bridge, has been managed by Sherry Kay Anderson for the past five years after she and her then-husband, Doug Yetter, purchased it in 1995. The facility had two previous owners, both of whom declared bankruptcy. Anderson was unavailable for comment yesterday.
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